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5 Reviews

Holt Pound, Farnham, Surrey GU10 4LD.
24 hour information line :01420 22838
Email: bookings@birdworld.co.uk
Enquiries :01420 22140
Bookings :01420 22992

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    5 Reviews
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      24.07.2012 13:21
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      A fun family day out to enjoy nature and wildlife at a reasonable price

      As The Carpenters so often seemed to, you may unexpectedly find yourself asking the eternal question of why do birds suddenly appear...? Well, it's probably because you've gone and taken yourself off to visit Birdworld near Farnham in Surrey. Birdworld began life as a simple bird park first opened in 1967 by Roy and Pat Harvey as nothing but a field and oast house yet it grew so successfully that many years later the park was divided up between the Harvey's children - their daughter and two sons - who sold the park on to the company Denys E Head Ltd in 1996. The whole park was then revamped to include access to a garden centre, the Underwater World and Jenny Wren's Farm thus incorporating other non-bird like animals and voilà...Birdworld, the largest bird park in England, was officially born.

      Birdworld, besides being a public zoo, also works towards conservation with local, national and international conservation projects looking out for blue tits, moths and butterflies, great bustards and endangered penguins and wildlife in the South American rainforest plus aims to be as environmentally friendly as possible with recycling and composting schemes so they are always grateful for donations which can come in the form of adopting an animal for a year which will pay for their upkeep. Education is also a priority with wildlife observation projects and the Outreach program which brings birds to schools, free workbooks to fill out round the park, pre-arranged specialised talks for groups from preschool to college including special needs schools plus the Keeper for the Day scheme which speaks for itself where people aged 16 years+ get to learn all the ins and outs of bird care or animal care on Jenny Wren's farm.


      ==Getting There==

      Address: Birdworld, Holt Pound, Farnham, Surrey, GU10 4LD
      Enquiries: 01420 22140
      Bookings: 01420 22992
      Website: www.birdworld.co.uk
      Email: bookings@birdworld.co.uk

      The easiest way to get to Birdworld looks to be by road as it is accessible via the A325 which can be reached either by the M25 or M3/J4 from which there are some early and recognisable brown signs with a chipper looking white cockatoo on directing you effortlessly to the centre where plenty of free parking (including disabled) is available. Alternatively, you could come in via train to Aldershot or Farnham but then you are looking at a fairly lengthy bus ride. For environmentally friendly people wishing to cycle their way in there are racks available for secure storage.


      ==Opening Times==

      Opening times during the High Season (April-September) are from 10am until 6pm where the whole park is accessible.

      Between October and December the opening times remain the same but accessibility fluctuates from the Mid, Low, and Limited Season options which means facilities like outdoor kiosks, the farm, displays etc. may not be operating so best check on the website for availability before embarking on your visit.


      ==Prices (2012)==

      Type: High Season / Mid Season / Low Season / Limited Opening
      Adult: £15.50 / £14.50 / £12.50 / £9.95
      Child 7-15: £13.50 / £12.50 / £10.50 / £7.95
      Child 3-6: £12.50 / £11.50 / £9.50 / £6.95
      Child Under 3: FREE
      Concession: £13.50 / £12.50 / £10.50 / £7.95 (1 carer can enter for £5.50)
      Family (2 adults + 2 children): £49.95 / £46.95 / £39.95 / £30


      ==My Day: High Season==

      Arriving about 45 minutes after the opening time the car park was still thankfully not filled up (my guess is despite sparkling sunshine, people were probably still anticipating the return of the monsoon like season recently replacing our usual summer) and there were no queues to purchase entry tickets so I'd already gotten off to a good start. With your ticket you get a free map and can also purchase a £1.99 guide book, which does have a very child friendly breakdown of what to expect from the park as well as interesting information about certain species of birds on display, along with mealworms and birdseed to feed the various birds as you go around...if flirting with beak related danger is your kind of thing...and from what I observed this is definitely something kids seemed to enjoy (although how Birdworld stops the birds suffering from crippling obesity is a mystery to me).

      There are daily events to plan your day around - penguin feeding at 11am and 3:30pm, the owl prowl at 4pm where you can watch owls being fed and ask questions, regular Safari train rides which take you up and down past the big birds like ostriches, emus, rheas, cranes and storks with an undoubtedly informative commentary, The Heron Theatre show (running at 1pm on the day I visited but times may vary) which is an indoor presentation in a tent like structure showing off a range of birds, Animal Encounters at the Jenny Wren Farm where some of the cute and cuddly animals are brought out so people, namely kids, gets a chance to get up close and personal to them with help from the farmhands as well as the outdoor flying bird display with some unexpected bird choices (on at 2:45pm for my visit but may vary) but I decided to take the wander-around-without-looking-at-the-map approach just to see what came my way. There are plenty of signposts dotted around with "Suggested Route" written on them to help you work out a sensible route to take in all the sights in an efficient way, but as I discovered you won't bring about the apocalypse if you defy them.

      So, upon leaving the information centre the first bird you meet is a blue macaw. Just gripping the fence with its talons and beak. Watching you. My first thought was I could be walking into some kind of Hitchcockian nightmare, but thankfully the majority of birds you encounter seem a bit more amiable so phew, it is a family friendly park after all. The next sight that greets you are flamingos on one side and a quaint duck pond on the other surrounded by a high flying fountain and beautiful greenery creating a thoroughly relaxed atmosphere to enjoy nature at its most tranquil (if you ignore the shrill squawks from I suspect the neighbouring cockatoos - the most likely culprits). The Temperate House is the first attraction to enter and in here you will find a few birds from more tropical countries that need the heating turned up just a notch and there is even a room with free flying (and quite large) birds in so you will need to be as slow moving and quiet as possible in here so as to not disturb them and cause that Hitchcockian reaction I was worried about. I'm of course joking about the physical assault but they have other, more unpleasant ways of getting revenge leaving you with a need to freshen up, so best be alert when passing through this section.

      The remainder of Birdworld is divided up into themed outdoor aviaries, such as the parrot aviary or the crescent aviary which you visit at your leisure marvelling at the beautiful array of just some of the 150 species of birds housed at Birdworld, including but not limited to: exotically coloured ones such as love birds or the wonderful Himalayan Monal; owls and other birds of prey; parrots, macaws and mynahs which do mimic human speech in a startlingly realistic way; pheasants; flamingos; pelicans; seashore waders like the spoonbill in a recreation of a seaside shore complete with overturned boat and anchor; large birds like emus and rheas (I somehow didn't spot any ostriches but I assume they are there); Humboldt penguins...the list goes on and I'll stop before I bore you senselessly, but each bird has its own information board with basic origins and interesting facts about them with an easy to identify picture which I found a great way to learn about all the different kinds of birds, although of course by now I've completely forgotten everything. Some birds are more of an attraction than others such as the penguins who have both an island and a beach at their disposal so you may have to try to find off-peak times during the day to check these guys out but otherwise there is plenty of space in between all the aviaries and people move around fairly quickly in my experience so you won't have to wait long to see the birds.

      There has also been a bit of time devoted to the surrounding areas around the aviaries to really enhance the ambience in the form of a sculptured woodland walk using bamboo to make a mini maze (as I discovered is a bit too small for an adult sized body), a willow "maze" just outside Jenny Wren's Farm (I use the term maze lightly as there are many routes through and frankly you could push your way through if you got really stuck), a Lost Trail (one for the kids) that take you on a trip to prehistoric times, plenty of small play areas with slides and climbing bars to give the parents a short break, a very neat looking topiary garden, a sensory garden which makes use of sound with flowing water and wind-chimes and smells with particularly pungent flowers and finally plenty of greenery just to top it all off. There are also a few kiosks dotted around everywhere to get a hot/cold drink, a snack or ice-cream and many park benches to stop and eat at or to simply have a quick break to soak up the peaceful atmosphere, all helping to make Birdworld such a fabulously relaxing place to visit.

      The only daily event I actually attended was the flying display as the Heron Theatre was on when I was eating lunch and we were too pushed for time to squeeze in the train and watch the penguins being fed so I can only reiterate planning your day to fit all these in is essential. I have been to many flying displays in the past but was pleasantly surprised by the choice of birds in this one - the usual falcons and hawks were replaced with Mozart the Bengal Eagle Owl, two brother Kookaburras called Lou and Harold, Stanley the Caracara and the star Charlie the Macaw (who has his own Facebook page under the name Charlie Mac) and each bird was given a 5 minute or so slot to strut their stuff and rather amusingly they all seemed particularly put off by the largest crowd to date and stubbornly refused to do many a trick leaving the poor presenters floundering a tad. But the talks about each bird were very interesting and informative (assuming you could hear over the excited chattering from the kids) and watching the birds in action was most entertaining so I'd recommend trying to squeeze this event in if you can.

      That just leaves the final two attractions Jenny Wren's Farm and the Underwater. Jenny Wren's Farm is a fairly small farm, but the first thing that will greet you is a strutting peacock presenting himself on display to practically everyone. Then there are all the usual suspects that can be admired / stroked including fluffy guinea pigs, chickens running about at your feet, pongy pigs, gruff goats and even reindeer and if you time it properly you can attend the special "Animal Encounters" event run by the farmhands. There are thankfully lots of hand-washing facilities using anti-bacterial soap upon leaving the farm to make sure everyone remains germ free if they've been handling the animals. There is also a pet shop here where you can buy rabbits, guinea pigs and a whole other assortment of animals so parents need to stay strong in the face of Puss-in-Boots eyes from their kids in this section or they could bring a whole menagerie home with them.

      To get to the Underwater World you do need to exit through the main information centre back into the car park so for us it made sense to leave it until last, but you can go back through to Birdworld if you flash your ticket so it's not really an issue. The Underwater World is very small, basically one short circuit that will probably only take about 10 minutes but there are some great and often disturbingly odd looking creatures here that will probably thrill kids and tickle the fancy of adults. The displays seem to move around the tropical jungle, the oceans, reefs and freshwater and you'll get to see such animals as piranhas, catfish, tetras, a turtle, caimen, a dwarf crocodile and weird corals and sponges, with titbits of information about them located all around, so whilst it is quick (which could be a good thing considering the size of the whole attraction) there are a lot of fun animals to see so it is worth popping in to.


      ==Facilities==

      * There are three sets of toilets around the park, one at the entrance, one by the penguins and one at Jenny Wren's farm all with disabled and baby changing facilities. The toilets started off clean and well stocked at the beginning of the day and remained that way at the end so I was quite impressed by the cleanliness, even if the hand-driers were particularly feeble.

      * Picnics are fine, with plenty of benches to settle on, snacks can be bought from the many kiosks, but if you want a proper meal you can visit the Puddleducks restaurant in the main information centre. Here they sell reasonably priced pre-made sandwiches and salads or you can choose from a selection of hot meals like jacket potatoes, lasagne, soup, fish and chips - the only thing I'd say is the menu is not overly helpful by being a bit vague. You can also get a nice array of teas and coffees and a selection of naughty looking desserts all to be eaten inside or out, and I had a very nice meal here of sausage roll, chips, mixed vegetables and tea for about £6.50.

      *There are two gift shops, one in the main information centre and one at Underwater World and they were definitely more aimed at kids with stuffed toys, children's books, t-shirts, stationery but I did buy myself a couple of cool looking 3D animal posters - 2 for £9 which I didn't feel was overpriced.

      * The Garden Centre is not part of Birdworld, but can be accessed from within the grounds or by driving further up in the car park once you leave Birdworld.

      * Disabled access should be good around the park with disabled parking, very flat levelled walkways making wheelchair access possible, free wheelchairs for use (best book in advance) and assistance dogs are allowed to attend (all other dogs are banned as they'd probably go a bit loopy with all the birds around).


      ==Final Thoughts==

      Birdworld is a fantastic place for fans of wildlife and families to visit with a beautifully relaxing atmosphere and gorgeous surroundings, a wonderful array of weird and wacky birds to look at from the colourful, to the noisy, to the just plain large as well as some farmyard and underwater animals to spice things up. There is plenty for kids to do with mazes, lost trails and playgrounds so they shouldn't get bored, there are some excellent facilities, the entry prices (3 attractions in 1) are very reasonable in my opinion and there is basically everything required to make for a peaceful day out - I cannot recommend the place highly enough. You just need to hope for good weather.

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        21.02.2011 22:16

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        We have visited Birdworld a couple of times a year for the last 5 years - the only reason we keep going is because it is covered by Tesco vouchers. It has become tatty, unkept and in dire need of a makeover. Even with Tesco vouchers I am beginning to consider it extortionate in price.I would never eat at the food shacks as the food is cheap, fried, over-priced greasy stodge. Perhaps if they lowered the price, more people would go, they could make more money and IMPROVE THE PLACE!!!

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        11.07.2010 00:14
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        A good day out

        My 18-month-old daughter is totally obsessed with all kinds of birds at the moment, and with this in mind we decided to treat her to a day trip to Bird World in Farnham, Surrey.

        The centre is conveniently located 3 miles south of Farnham on the A325. and is easily accessible from the M25 and well signposted. Parking was plentiful and queues minimal when we went at lunchtime on a Saturday.

        Bird World is well laid out, with enclosures grouped together along shady, winding paths. There are all manner of birds here from Pelicans to Penquins and Owls to Vultures.

        As it was very hot when we visited, a lot of the birds were as lethargic as we were, with many not finding the energy to move or do anything very exciting, but that's ok. Who can blame them in a heatwave?

        The penquins were like statues, they were so still and my daughter was not even remotely interested in them. There is a viewing area, where you can see them swim underwater and I'm sure this would come into its own on the days when they feel like getting wet and energetic!

        My daughter tends to find flying birds fascinating so for that reason she was most excited by the smaller tropical birds which flitted about, displaying their grace and pretty colours. My husband meanwhile adores owls so he was delighted to see many different breeds here.

        As well as the birds, there is a small farm here, charmingly called Jenny Wren Farm. The usual suspects can be found here including chickens, goats and rabbits. Some of the birds roam free and it was a little alarming and slightly surreal to witness a stand-off and almost fight between a proud peacock and an over zealous, or perhaps even jealous turkey!

        The farm also has a nice petting area where rabbits, guinea pigs and mice are free to roam across a table so that children can touch them. My daughter saw her first mouse at close range and she absolutely loved it. I'm not so sure he was as keen on her though, especially when she started shrieking with excitement...

        There are a couple of play areas at Bird World, and they take the form of traditional wooden climbing frame and slide combinations. They look like great fun but as my daughter is still at the soft play stage the only thing she could avail of were the swings.

        Likewise there is a restaurant by the entrance, one in the middle of the park and a snack shack or two dotted around as well. They looked clean and the food seemed appealing, but we were unsure if they accepted card so decided against eating at any of them. They sold sandwiches, chips, burgers and ice cream, among other delights.

        A picnic is a good option though as there are some lovely quiet, spots in the shade to enjoy a bite to eat at leisure.

        Toilets and baby change facilities are plentiful and were clean, tidy and well stocked, so no issues there.

        Having worked with disabled people in the past, I am always conscious of access issues and am pleased to say this attraction is flat and accessible throughout. Obviously guide dogs are very welcome.

        On the way out of the park there is also Underwater World which is a small aquatic centre, featuring tropical fish, turtles and aligators. While not large, or overly impressive, my little monster loved it so it's definately worth a few minutes since it's included in the entrance price.

        And so on to the prices - adults cost £13.95 each and children over three cost £10.95. While I enjoyed the day here, I do find that extortionate really, especially if you were to pay for a couple of kids. It would certainly not be somewhere I could afford to go very often!

        But that is the only downside really if you, or someone accompanynmg you likes our feathered friends. The site is smaller than I was expecting but still fills 26 acres so is a good size.

        We spent a few hours here but could have easily stayed longer, especially if we had been organised enough to bring a picnic and more drinks, and if the heat had been less intense.

        I would recommend this attraction on everything except price and that is the only area I am marking it down on.

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          21.04.2010 01:50
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          A great day out for the kids

          Birdworld is located in Farnham, Surrey and is accessible from the M3 Junction 4, and the A331.

          Birdworld is a large sanctuary of birds, of all different types and varities from around the world, from parrots to flamingoes and everything in between. There really is quite a display of birds, but I refuse to go there any more, birds are a fear of mine lol.

          Birds are not the only thing to be found at Birdworld. There is also a small farm, where you can see sheep, cows, pigs etc and a underwater world of fish and sea creatures (I am scared of fish too!) There are also cool play areas and assault courses for kids, plus eating areas and restaurants. There is also a penguin enclosure, and here you can see the feeding of the penguins, which is quite fun. If you wish to feed the penguins yourself, you can do this, but this will cost you £29.95 per person, and you have to call in advance to book this.

          There is also the chance for a safari ride, where you get to see some of the bigger birds and creatures in the park, with a commentary from a guide whilst sitting on a train. This runs a few times a day. You can also visit the heron theatre, where regular shows throughout the day are put on by a team of birds that have been trained to perform clever tricks. You can handle some of the farm animals at certain times throughout the day too, on the Jenny Wren farm as long as the weather is good. These animals include sheep and goats, among others.

          There is also an owl show, where you can watch the owls being fed (not the yummiest of meals!) and you can learn some interesting facts about owls.

          Birdworld is open all year round, but different times apply to different seasons, so check their website www.birdworld.co.uk for admission times before you go. Adult admission is £13.95, children under 6 are £10.95, children under 15 are £11.95 and senior citizens, students and disabled visitors are also £11.95. A disabled person may bring a carer with them for free. There is the option to buy an annual membership pass, but I am unsure on the prices of this.

          The price may seem a little high, and it has been raised in the past few years, but there is a lot to do in Birdworld, and it is a great day out for the kids, especially in the summer holidays. The restaurant is actually really good quality, but a little on the expensive side, so if you can take your own food with you, I do recommend doing so.

          There is plenty of free parking space at Birdworld, so no need to worry about parking as this will not be a problem. There are bike racks for anyone who arrives on a bike, and Birdworld is well signposted throughout Farnham for those who are driving. The address for anyone using a sat nav is Birdworld, Holt Pound, Farnham, Surrey, GU10 4LD, UK

          I hope you enjoy your day out in Birdworld, and thankyou for reading.

          *also on ciao under name of Hailee*

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            21.09.2001 05:49
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            Don't be put off by the name!! It's not just a place for Bill Oddie wannabes, but a great family day out, with a lot more to see than a few manky parrots and penguins. One very hot Saturday in July (yes, there was one), myself, my husband, my mum and stepdad took Thomas (then 18 months) to see the 'dirds' at Birdworld. We paid £8.50 each to get in (under 3s are free) - this included access to all parts of Birdworld plus Underwater World, a small and relatively interesting section with tanks of fish, seahorses, coral and an area with alligators. Entrance to Birdworld is, of course, through the large shop - I would imagine this would be a real pain with older children. The park is set out beautifully, with cages of birds in groups, and shady pathways weaving between them. There is information about the each bird, and many reassurances about their welfare. It was fairly quiet when we went, but even if it had been busy, everyone wandering about at their own pace and in their own direction would have meant little congestion. One word of warning though - get to the penguin area early for feeding time, as this is incredibly popular. There are many different species of birds to see, from storks to spoonbills, including emus, ostriches, vultures, toucans… There are woodland and seaside walks, where the birds are walking free (their wings are clipped to stop them flying away - this does not hurt them) and a 'train' ride to see the larger birds a bit closer. Thomas enjoyed the ride, although he was a bit confused by the train, which appeared to look more like a big car! Right at the end of the park is the Jenny Wren Farm area, with all the usual pigs, chickens etc, plus mice, ferrets and guinea pigs which you can get close to. There are animal handling sessions at certain times, and plenty of places to wash hands afterwards. The highlight of Thomas' day was sitting on an old tractor sunk into the ground in
            the play area - a big hit with most of the children we saw there. I would advise taking a picnic with you if you go to Birdworld. There is a café (with limited seating, and with highchairs) selling sandwiches, salads, warm meals and drinks, and a few cabins around the park selling hotdogs, chips etc and it's not too horrendously priced. However, there are many grassy areas and picnic benches, and nowhere is too far from the carpark, so you needn't carry it all with you. There are also excellent play areas for older children, although not a lot suitable for toddlers. On a practical note, there are plenty of toilets and baby changing facilities dotted around the park. We had a great day at Birdworld. Thomas left clutching his new cuddly owl (courtesy of Nanny and Grandad) and his new penguin (courtesy of mummy and daddy - suckers!) and even began to call the 'dirds' 'birds'! We were there about 4 hours, but it could easily be a whole day out with older children. Be prepared to walk quite a lot, expect some loud squawks and pungent smells, and have a fantastic day out at Birdworld! Open every day until 4th Nov 2001. Open 9.30 - 6pm (in summer) - last admission 5pm. Adults £8.50; Children 3 - 14 years £5.50; Family £24.50; Senior Citizens £6.95. You can book online, but only 2 or more days in advance - then you get a 10% discount. They have a website with loads more details, plus winter opening times: www.birdworld.co.uk.

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