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House of Marbles (Bovey Tracey)

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7 Reviews

The Old Pottery, Pottery Road, Bovey Tracey, Devon TQ13 9DS.
tel = 01626 835358

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    7 Reviews
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      31.05.2011 23:14
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      A tourist attraction in South Devon

      The house of marbles is an attraction(?) that is close to where we live so we sometimes pop in when going past. I would recommend popping in if you are in the area but I personally would be disappointed if on holiday I drove a distance to get there. The reason for this is that it will not take a great deal of time to look around and once you have looked around there isn't much you can do to spin the time out - I'll explain further in a minute. A little info - The House of Marbles is situated in Bovey Tracey which is a town adjoining the South of Dartmoor. It has good travel links, being a five minute drive off the A38. Parking and entry are free. Facilities include toilets and a restaurant. The House of Marbles is basically a shop with a glass blowing factory and a small museum attached to it, or at least that's how I see it. The shop, set over two floors, sells a variety of items including traditional children's toys, cards, jewellery, toiletries, even furniture but as another reviewer has said the prices can be quite steep, although the items are good quality. It also sells glassware which I believe is made on the premises, such as paperweights, vases, and of course marbles in various sizes shapes and colours. When I was younger it was a treat to go there and chose from the marbles that are displayed like pick and mix. Then there's the museum section of the building. It details how glass has been manufactured and used over the years and gives information about the factory. There are also various marbles on display. In all honestly I find it a bit boring and don't think it's very interesting for kids. However, kids will probably be mesmerized by the mechanical marble runs that are on display and will no doubt love the rather noisy giant marble run which flanks a wall of the shop. Depending on when you are there you can also see glass being blown in the workshop. You have to hit the right time for this though as viewing is not always on offer. The House of Marbles really is unique. Overall, I'd say that it's a good place to incorporate into a day out but do not plan on spending your whole day there.

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        04.05.2011 19:04
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        Verdict - I wouldn't go again, except to call in for a tasty lunch if I'm already in the area.

        After reading a review on the internet for The House of Marbles in Newton Abbot, Devon, we decided to visit there last weekend (Easter Saturday 2011). It's unusual to find something to do in Devon & Cornwall that is 'Free', so we were definitely keen to go. The photo of the stunning looking Colonial-style house that accompanied that particular internet review really clinched the deal. It was a hot, sunny day so we thought it would be lovely to sit in the grounds once we'd visited the indoor attraction. As per the previous review, yes, the House of Marbles is very easy to find. We put the postcode (TQ13 9DS) into the SatNav and off we went. For your information, the full address is ........ House of Marbles and Teign Valley Glass The Old Pottery Bovey Tracey Devon TQ13 9DS Telephone: 01626 835285 It's located in Devon not far from the A38. There are plenty of brown tourist signs if you don't have a SatNav. It's near the Drumbridges roundabout where you'll also find Trago Mills. We were convinced we had the wrong location when we initially arrived as we found ourselves sitting in a busy tarmac carpark with huge wrought iron gates around it, and looking up at a red brick factory! What a huge disappointment! But hey ho! "them's the breaks" We went in, still determined to enjoy ourselves. The House of Marble, is a working glass and games factory set up in an old pottery. We went inside the entrance to the building and yes it's "free" - well that is to say there is no admission fee. I should jolly well think there's not, when you consider it's a glorified retail centre!! That would be like Debenhams charging admission for you to just browse! Perhaps they don't charge admission as they make enough money through breakages (All the very expensive glassware is placed low down on open shelves perfect for little fingers! Go figure!) You walk in through the main doors & you're in the shop. It's pretty much all glassware, jewellery, sweets and marbles on the ground floor. The glassware is over priced and not particularly special (in my opinion). It's plain but pricey! I ended up buying a paperweight that was a chunk of rough glass with one smooth side with an amonite etched inside the glass. I paid £24 which was ok. It was reduced from £60 and there is no way on earth it was ever worth that! The sweets & cakes etc that were for sale were also overpriced (in the opinion of at least half a dozen Mums who were making kids put things back with offers of trips to Tesco's or Trago etc later!) The upstairs is mostly wooden bits of furniture & toys, woollen jumpers & handmade handbags, clothing & knicknacks. The prices made us stop looking at the items after the first two minutes! ie Small bagatelle board £87.99, A wood & marble solitaire set £699.99, £200 daytime cloth handbag, £250 summer cardigan. The upper balcony has a viewing point for a large marble run. It's an amazing huge metal maze contraption on the wall that runs massive marbles through it. It's quite a feat of precision engineering, but the down side is it makes a deafening (and after a few mins annoying!) noise. Although the noise of bored whining children can drown it out occasionally if you're lucky. You can apparently watch the glass blowing demonstration ... if you go on a day it's happening - which we didn't (apparently Saturday it's not available). So with no demonstration to watch you're left to attempt to mooch around through hoards of bored kids and frazzled parents shouting to little Britney to put that £200 vase down and little Kyle he can't have the tiny £8 piece of easter cake as it's only 99p in Tesco!! Downstairs again & out of retail hell, you go through to a small museum (two rooms) that have shelves of vintage marbles & toys etc. There are three large marble mazes behind glass that you can press a button to set them off & watch the marbles run round. (One of them currently has an "out of order" sign on it! The other two though are good to watch (for a couple of minutes). The glass museum tells you about the history of glass, the basic ingredients and how various items are made, and the different qualities of glass materials etc. It's very interesting but only takes about 15-20mins. We enjoyed looking at the old wooden games & toys, taking a trip down memory lane as to which ones we'd had when we were children. But I'd certainly say from our experience on the day, that the older adults present had more fun looking at them than the young parents & children had! They just glanced at them & walked on. The building is not particularly wheelchair friendly. A lady in a wheelchair was struggling to get round the groundfloor due to aisle widths & large crowds. Her carer was then unable to get her down the ramp into the disabled toilet as the very heavy door wouldn't stay open, so I (a total stranger to them!) needed to go into the toilet infront of them & hold the door open, let the carer wheel her in and then I had to squeeze past to exit the toilet so they could lock the door behind me! We saw them later having difficulty getting through the cafe to the seating area. The busy cafe has seating indoors (but it's dark and gloomy) and also seating in an adjoining conservatory. It was such a wonderful hot sunny day we found the packed conservatory too warm so we were lucky to finally grab a table outside (you have to be quick though as everyone hovers for a chance to sit outside!) There is a 'games garden' on the small upper patio area where children can play large size chess, skittles or Jenga etc. Great fun when the children were playing with adults, but annoying (to say the least!) when parents got bored & left their obnoxious offspring unattended to start throwing 3ft wooden toys around! The cafe/restaurant is a little expensive for a 'family day out' type lunch, but if you're sensible you can have a really lovely lunch on a budget. We were going to order a "Cream Tea" (scone, jam, cream, pot of tea) for £4.75, a sandwich for £5.95, and a cake for £2.75 (£13.45 total) however watching food arrive at neighbouring tables we sussed the cheapest option was "The Old Pottery Afternoon Tea" It was excellent value! For a mere £8.95 you get a selection of sandwiches (West Country brie & apple with homemade chutney, plus beautiful Locally smoked salmon and cucumber) plated up with a large amount of fresh salad garnish, grapes, orange slices and dish of coleslaw. An enormous (double size) heart shaped scone with clotted cream and lovely preserves, plus a large slice of cake, and a choice of either a pot of tea or coffee! The food was very good quality, fresh and tasty! So we saved £4.50 but had exactly the same food we wanted, just a different way of ordering it! Every little helps, especially if there are a few of you on a family day out. The cafe also serves a wide range of hot meals & snacks. The food looked hearty portions, fresh & tasty. (Other diners certainly sounded happy with the food whilst eating & left very little) The cafe is licensed and serves a range of wines, beers, and even champagne. They offer a "Champagne Afternoon Tea for Two" which is £38.95 and includes a Bottle of champagne, selection of sandwiches, hearty scone with clotted cream, finest preserve, slice of cake with tea or coffee. Although, on a personal note, we found the Champagne for TWO to be a strange choice for a daytime-only cafe to offer, when the fairly remote location means one of you is going to be driving (??) House of Marbles certainly won't keep you occupied for a whole day - maybe 2-3 hours including lunch. There is a large car park outside so you shouldn't have trouble parking. Its open Monday to Saturday 9am to 5pm and Sunday 10.00am to 5.00pm. Closed on Easter Sunday (due to "Sunday trading laws" according to the sign!). I wouldn't recommend this place to anyone with young children, and would say wheelchair users would ideally need to be accompanied. Note from my miserable 'other half' - "Husbands might prefer to keep hold of 'the plastic' if your wife is into overpriced handbags & clothing that apparently aren't even designer brands!" Verdict - I wouldn't go again, except to call in for lunch if I'm already in the area. Many thanks for reading this. xx (I may also be posting it on Ciao under the same name - Zurich11)

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          27.04.2011 11:19

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          Great, family friendly place to visit. Lots to see and do with amazing marble runs, including one huge one. We enjoyed watching the glass blowing and had a very good meal in the restaurant where the prices are very reasonable and the service efficient and friendly. Lovely shops, including a great range of clothes upstairs. it's not all marbles!

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          05.02.2011 19:33
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          A decent, free day out for all the family

          As we had headed all the way to Torquay for the football on the Saturday and stayed over we decided it would be a shame to rush straight back to Berkshire first thing on Sunday morning. This lead to the inevitable discussions about where to go and ideally it was going to be somewhere that wouldn't cost too much. Having browsed several leaflets we settled on the House Of Marbles. Location Having left Torquay and visited a few other places enroute including Dartmouth we headed back to Newton Abbott to find our way to The House of Marbles. It is located on the outskirts of Bovey Tracey on the edge of the Dartmoor National Park and only a couple of minutes off of the A38 which links Exeter and Plymouth. From the Drumbridges junction on the A38 the House of Marbles is signposted along the A382 before turning onto Pottery Road. The entrance is really easy to find and when we visited the car park at the front of the building had plenty of spaces left. I would imagine this would change during the busy summer period, however additional parking around the back of the building was also advertised. Being an out of town attraction the parking was free and this meant there were no added pressures of rushing back to the car to put more money into the ticket machine. Cost In perhaps something of a rarity for an attraction in Britain and in particular a popular tourist area the admission to the House of Marbles was a very pleasant surprise. That is because it is free of charge. There are a few extra costs that can be incurred should you wish to try your hand at glass blowing but the museum, glass blowing displays and shop were all free and this made the visit very worthwhile. Opening Times The House of Marbles is open 364 days a year from 9am to 5pm on Mondays to Saturdays and from 10am to 5pm on a Sunday. In addition the glass blowing displays take place from 9am till 4.30pm Monday to Friday and 10am till 3pm on a Sunday. There are no displays on a Saturday. House Of Marbles Having grown up playing with marbles at school and at home the chance to visit not only a marble museum but a working factory was really appealing. I may be past the age of playing with them now but I was still interested to learn the concept behind them and see not only how they are made but also the different varieties of marbles that are being made these days. In addition to marbles the House of Marbles is also the home of a working glass manufacture and one of the other exhibits within the building is the Teign Valley Glass Works. The museum sections are split into 3 different areas, the history of marbles, the glass works and a room devoted to the buildings original use as a pottery. Whilst the three exhibits aren't perhaps the world's largest they have been put to very good use and each area is crammed with interesting exhibits that mean you can spend a good 2 to 3 hours in the building and still find it quite interesting. As it was the marble connection that really inspired the visit it would seem fair to start with these exhibits. There are a number of cabinets containing all of the different styles of Marbles that they have produced over the years including a little bit of history. The most interesting aspect of the marble section though are the marble runs, which also includes the world's largest and it is fair to say that you can spend a number of hours just watching these in action. We found that this made for a fascinating element for both adults and children alike. In the next room is the Teign Valley glass exhibit displaying a number of items they have produced over the years. Like the marble section they have a history of the glass displayed and this too is incredibly interesting but gets kind of lost when you see the glass blowing exhibit at the end of this room. Here you can watch a live demonstration of how glass is created before being able to buy it in the shop. They also have charts and display boards explaining what the glass blowers are doing and again this can stop you for a good half hour to an hour as you watch this fascinating process. Given that this used to be a key location in the production of Pottery it seems almost a shame that it is crammed into a small room at the back of the shop. The display includes a model of how the Pottery used to be set out and the process for making it, however I felt this was perhaps in too small an area and some of the most interesting aspects about it will be missed because of this. Café & Shop As the entrance fee is free of charge it probably comes as no surprise that the shop is the biggest part of the House of Marbles. From here you can buy all manor of goods from household elements to sweets. Perhaps most importantly though it's from here you can buy the marbles and glass ornaments that are made on site. The selection of items available is unbelievable and the prices are much better than anywhere else we had visited in the area. We bought a box of marbles for use in vases with flowers and at £3 for a decent sized box of decoration marbles it seemed to be a very good price. The House of Marbles did have a cafe, which seemed to be very popular. We unfortunately didn't get a chance to eat there as they were taking bookings and had a waiting time of an hour, which for a weekend at the start of January suggested the food was worth trying. We however opted for a pub back in Newton Abbott, but the prices were about the same and the wait suggested the food must be good. Overall As free attractions go it was certainly worth a visit. Having enjoyed playing with marbles as a kid I found this part of the museum to be very interesting and lost myself for almost half an hour watching the world's largest Marble run. The Pottery element of the museum was a little disappointing and given its significance to the area perhaps warranted a more prominent and bigger display but that was just a minor disadvantage. It would be fair to say that the opportunity to watch the glass blowing more than made up for it. The different elements of the House of Marbles make it a worthwhile visit for everyone as there is plenty to see. Of course the shop is the biggest element but in order to support the free sections of the House of Marbles I really can't complain about that. It would be fair to say that the attraction is perhaps a shop first and a museum second but the quality of what is on display makes it a very fair compromise. For free youd be hard pushed to find a better way to spend a few hours in this area. Website www.houseofmarbles.com

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            13.07.2009 11:06
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            A great free attraction which will keep you occupied for a few hours

            My dad recently told us about The House of Marbles as he had been to see it with relatives; he loved it so much he wanted to take us to see it so at the weekend we went with him to take a look around. The House of Marbles is very easy to find its in Devon between Plymouth and Exeter on the A38, just off the Drumbridges roundabout (Trago Mills roundabout) towards Bovey Tracey, it has the usual brown tourist attraction signs to follow so you cant miss it. The House of Marbles was not at all what I was expecting; I kind of had it in my head that if my dad enjoyed it then it would be boring for younger people and I'm pleased to say that I was wrong and I'm very glad he took us there. So what is The House of Marble, well it's a working glass and games factory which is based in an old pottery. Firstly you have the glass blowing part where you can watch glass blowers make various pieces which later get sold in the shop. When we where there they where making glass muffins and it was amazing to watch. You can also have glass moulds made here which is the other reason we visited, my dad wanted us to have a glass mould done of our little girls hands, basically you press their hands into wet sand to get an imprint, they then pour glass into it, once its set you can take it home and you have a really unusual keepsake for your child. My little girl didn't play ball and kept grabbing the sand so we ended up doing her feet, it came out really nice and at £30 I thought this was a really nice gift. Alongside the glass blowing you also have the glass museum which tells you all about the history of glass, how various things are made, this then leads you into the marble museum which again tells you how they are made etc, they even have a machine from the 1980's which had made over 15 million marbles, it's a very interesting piece of machinery to look around. As I said earlier this attraction is also a games factory so you also have rooms of very old board games & marble games it was amazing to see how a few bits of wood and a couple of marbles could keep children entertained years ago, I don't think these would keep children entertained for very long these days. The House of Marbles also have various marble runs, all created by a swiss inventor over 10 years ago, these are fascinating to watch, they have a few small ones in glass cabinets which I could have spent hours watching, each time a marble went down the track it would flick a switch so the next marble took a completely different route and so on. These are precision made marble runs where the timing is spot on, I would image these took years to design and build. Once you have finished looking at he small marble runs then you move on to the large one which probably takes up the side of a two storey house (its the largets one in England), this again is fascinating to watch and is a precise as the small ones. There is also a restaurant here where you can sit either inside or out and there is a games garden so whist you are having a coffee your children can play large chess, skittles, Jenga etc. It is a little expensive but then most attractions have expensive restaurants. Finally you have the shop, you will spend quite a long time in here as there is so much to look at, firstly you have all the glass products which are made on site, these range from jewelry to vases and bowls etc. You also have loads of great gift ideas, (I'm thinking of getting my nieces Christmas presents here as the toys are ones that you would never find in a typical toy shop), they have a massive selection of marbles, you can pick your own (a bag of 25 cost around £1), there are books, puzzles, kites the list goes on. I have to say this attraction wont keep you occupied for a whole day (we spent about four hours here) but if you are taking a trip to Dartmoor or Trego its well worth popping into on your way home. This attraction is totally free to visit; it has a large car park outside so you shouldn't have any trouble parking. Its open Monday to Saturday 9am to 5pm and Sunday 10.00am to 5.00pm.

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              26.06.2001 05:27
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              When I was on holiday my girlfriend suggested that we grouped together a load of those flyers you can find on racks in pubs, swimming pools and the like, then decide where we would go. I will write about the other places soon but this one was the cheapest, in fact it was free. If you’re anything like me, when you go out you want to be entertained so if you are going to spend half a day in one place it must have plenty to see and do…. At first glance the flyer gives a fair idea of what you are in for, but I still had my doubts and was sure that this would be an hours trip to a glass shop. How wrong I was, for a start we were there for more than three hours and the range of things to see was surprising. ~~Factory Seconds & Gift Shop~~ The entrance to the factory leads you straight into the shop area, here you can find a vast range of glass products and games, marbles being the obvious game. If you can think of anything that’s made in glass you can probably find it here, most of it is made in the factory on site but there is also a lot of unusual products sourced from all over the world. If you’re looking for that unusual gift for someone who has everything, or is just hard to buy for then this is the answer to your prayers. Be warned though, you can easily get carried away and end up spending a fortune. ~~The Museums~~ Once you have walked through the shop you should find yourself in the museum area. There are three museums on the site explaining the history of Bovey Potteries, the history of Glass, and the history of the Board Game. Bovey Potteries – A collection of local wares dating back for over 200 years, not particularly interesting unless that’s your thing but a nice little curiosity section. Board Games & Glass – Just before you get to the entrance to the factory area there is a room split into two, on one side is the history of glass with examples from all over the world and on the other is nothing but games, not Monopoly or Cluedo but those old fashion ones from yesteryear. Pinball was one that I recognised, a wooden base with a stick to push ball bearings at targets made from panel pins. There was an old man that lived next door to us when I was little he used to make them as a way to remember his childhood. He used to make catapults too but that’s another story. In the middle of the room is an amazing piece of machinery, it looks like a giant corkscrew but it’s actually an early marble-making machine. ~~Marbles~~ Another room houses a collection of marbles from all over the world and three interesting marble runs. The runs were made by Alex Schmid an artist from Switzerland, they each have their own names just like a work of art, on one wall are two small runs “The Worker” and “The Millennium” and on the other wall a large run, “Curriculum Vitae” but the best run is a third one that takes up all of one of the stair wells “Snooki”, covering an area of 36 square meters and uses 37 pool balls, which race around intricate tracking, moving objects, ringing bells and generally making a racket, my girlfriends favourite bit is a funnel at the bottom of the run that keeps the balls spinning around a bit like a ball in a roulette wheel. ~~Glass Blowing~~ This is a unique experience, your chance to watch the crafts men at work. I was impressed by it all but then it was the first time I had seen it done. My girlfriend informs me that she had seen better displays in Plymouth. All I can say is it’s very hot, more so if the weather is hot and a bit smelly, the gas running the furnaces reminded me of doing metal work at school. ~~Licensed Restaurant and Coffee Shop~~ It’s going to take you at least a few hours to tour th e buildings so a stop for a break in the restaurant is welcoming. There is a nice range on the menu, serving everything from morning coffee or breakfast to “homemade” daily specials for lunch. We had a meal called Magical Mushrooms basically a garlic and cheese dish, and another meal called Surf The Net, a mixture of lightly breaded scampi and a few rings of battered squid. Both meals with a Cappuccino and Lemonade came to a very reasonable £11-25. The customer service was great too they really make you feel relaxed, in fact the manager was giving out jigsaw puzzles to all the children, my girlfriend ended up with one too!?! If you want to enjoy the sun you can take your meal outside to a large tabled area behind the old kilns, and if you have kids they can go off and play marbles in a purpose built ring complete with marbles. ~~The Shop Upstairs~~ If you have some money to spend or you want a really special present this section is for you. This could easily be a section of Harrods, there is a selection of Walnut furniture, and Bone China dinner services, as well as novel kitchen condiments but this is mixed in well with affordable treats like fancy food dressings and locally made fudge… mmmm One of my favourite bits of this shop is the collection of paperweights and limited addition marbles. The marbles are about 7 inches in diameter and are blown to represent Planets or Pictures. The best ones are the ones of Venus and Earth both about £250 - £400 each. ~~Conclusion~~ This was a really good day out, and if you don’t buy anything in the shops, it’ll be totally free, so what have you got to lose. If you have kids don’t worry about the lack of games machines, I’m sure they’ll have fun playing their “newly” found games. Parking is also free and there’s plenty of it, but it’ s still worth getting there early especially during the school holidays because it gets busier after mid –day. There is also a warning for coach parties to book in advance only. OPEN TIMES Monday – Saturday 9am – 5pm Sunday 9am – 4-30pm Glass Blowing Demonstrations can be view Monday – Friday 9am – 4.30pm and Sunday 10am – 3pm from Easter till the end of September. CONTACTS House Of Marbles, The Old Pottery road, Bovey Tracey, Devon TQ13 9DS Telephone: 01626 835285 Website: www.houseofmarbles.com Email: uk@houseofmarbles.com HOW DO I GET THERE? If you have come in from Newton Abbot you need to head towards Drum Bridge roundabout, follow the A382 towards Bovey Tracey then take the first exit at the next roundabout, you are now about 30 metres away from the factory. Its well signposted so I dare you to get lost…… have a great day out and enjoy yourself.

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                07.06.2001 01:25
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                The House of Marbles is situated in Bovey Tracey, Devon. It’s pretty easy to find, you just have to head for the Drumbridges Roundabout (if you are travelling from South of Bovey), this is the roundabout that goes to the Newton Abbot branch of Trago Mills. From the roundabout you then head to Bovey Tracey and keep going straight until you reach a mini roundabout where you take the first exit. There is a sign here directing you the few hundred yards of the rest of the way and the building can be found on your right. Should these directions not be enough for you their full address is: House of Marbles, Pottery Road, Bovey Tracey, Newton Abbot Tel: 01626 835358 Local information points may also have a copy of their promotional leaflet, which I have managed to loose *hanging head in shame*. This leaflet provides you with a small map to show you where to go, probably much more helpful than my directions!! Now I will endeavour to remember the most important things about a visit to The House of Marbles. I’m not 100% sure about opening times, so it may be best to ring ahead, and I will update this when possible. It is popular with coach parties, so it is worth getting there quite early to miss the rush, or go later in the morning when most of them have gone. If you wish to take a coach party here (well, you might!), you must book ahead. There is enough parking for a few buses and there seems to be ample space for cars. What’s more, parking is free here, as is the entry to the place itself. So what is The House of Marbles? Well, it is a working museum type place where you can learn about the history of the marble, how they were made, how they were invented, the different types and the materials and processes used to make them. But the information is not limited to marbles. There is a section that identifies other games played in the past, some of which many of us will recognise, but which are not in gen eral circulation any more. Then there is an area that looks at glass, a section about pottery and there are various examples and models around. There is even an old marble making machine tht has been shipped back from America! If this isn’t enough for you, there is a small area (which gets very warm) where you can watch glass blowers at work making decanters and other glassware as the public look on. You are allowed to ask questions and there are pictorial representations of the workshop dotted around that describe what you can see. This is very interesting for those who have never seen glass blowing before, but to be honest I have seen better displays both in Scotland and in Plymouth. There are also examples of marble runs; intricately designed wire structures, designed to carry marbles through loops and turns which is great fun to watch. There is a bigger version of a marble run on a wall as you go through the shop and up the stairs. This uses billiard balls instead of marbles and is fascinating to watch… trust me, you have to see it! Other things to see are the huge kiln/chimney things in the courtyard. This is where the pottery and glass used to be fired. It is on this courtyard that you can have a meal, or there are some marbles to play with if you prefer! There is also a restaurant so if you don’t want to eat outside you can eat here and it is reasonably sized. The food is very good but is a little expensive; I guess you get what you pay for. Whilst we were there the children were given a complementary jigsaw puzzle… as was I, the waiter took pity on me!!! Also, whilst in the restaurant be sure to look out for the gorilla. Keep an eye on him because you never know what he might do! You can purchase goods from the shop, which is about the size of the rest of the museum exhibitions put together! You can buy glass rods that look like sticks of rock, paperweights, glass ornaments, vases etc. Marbles mad e of glass or marble – which are VERY reasonably priced, and glass icicles and snowflakes which are 99p each. Other novelty gifts are available, like musical cookie jars and games. Upstairs you can find more glassware plus a moose head (fun for the kids – I don’t think it is real, but I can’t recall for sure) and wooden furniture. Hand creams and soaps, plus luxury oils and conserves can also be found here, making this area smell lovely. Also, look out for the snoring bear! I think that is all you need to know. The place isn’t huge, but it still occupied us for about three hours, and as I mentioned before, entry is free so what do you have to loose!!

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