Welcome! Log in or Register

Bosworth Battlefield (Leicestershire)

  • image
3 Reviews

Site of the Battle of Bosworth Field, where Richard III made his last stand against Henry VII in the Wars of the Roses. Visitor Centre and Country Park. The Battlefield Site is 2 miles south of Market Bosworth near the village of Sutton Cheney.

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    3 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      07.11.2010 14:42
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      3 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Not sure I'd visit again unless I was able to find the battlefield itself!

      The Bosworth Battlefield has a very impressive website, so I went with high expectations. Situation just outside Leicester, it boasts a country park, education centre, special events, exhibition, gift shop and tithe barn restaurant. On the day we visited, it seemed more popular with Sunday afternoon walkers rather than people visiting the attraction itself. I was surprised by this as the attraction boasted special events for Halloween, and I expected there to be a lot of families. When it came to it, I couldn't honestly see the Halloween attractions and there were no signposts to them, so maybe they were cancelled! The attraction is set over a wide area of several miles, and embraces much woodland and also a stretch of the Ashby Canal. There are several large scale maps around the site, though there didn't appear to be any which you could take with you. This proved a bit of a problem, as we'd primarily visited to view the battlefield itself. Well, we walked and walked and walked and never found it! The signposting on the site is extremely poor; this coupled with no option to take a map with you is a real problem. We thought we were walking towards the battlefield itself, but instead arrived at the canal; this ended up as a three mile round trip! The exhibition and gift shop looked good, though we didn't visit these (we were fed up after walking so far!). What surprised me was that there were very few people there; considering it was half-term, I expected a lot of families. The car park is well-maintained, and on this occasion was virtually empty. I can imagine that it gets crowded in the summer though, and the overspill parking is a walk away. Overall, it's a nice area and there are plenty of good views (I took lots of lovely autumn photographs!), but the lack of sign posts, which to me seems a very basic thing, really spoils it. Considering it sells itself as the Bosworth Battlefield, it would be good to actually visit the Battlefield itself! It is however the sort of place with something for everyone, particularly families (though as I say, there weren't many in evidence, despite it being half-term). There are the usual toilet facilities, and the site has clearly been adapted to meet the demands of those with additional needs.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        23.09.2010 14:46
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A nice place to visit for an hour but not for much longer

        After reading then reviewing Alison Weirs The Princes in the Tower non-fiction book I happened to be driving between Birmingham and Sheffield and saw sign posts for the Battle of Bosworth field so decided to visit the site. Battle of Bosworth Field The battle happened in 1485 between Lancastrian forces of Richard III and the Yorkist Henry Tudor, the future Henry VII. The battle bought to an end the century long war of the Roses with the introduction of the Tudor royal family which would reign for the next century. Richard III was the last Lancastrian king; he was also the last Plantagenet king and the last to die on the battlefield. Richard had usurped the throne of his nephew Edward V after the death of Edwards's father and Richards brother Edward IV. The fate of the battle and Richards life hinged on the actions of certain powerful dukes who during the switched allegiance to Henry from Richard. Richard lost the battle and his life and the future of England was determined for the next hundred years or so. The modern battle site So travelling along the M42, take the exit which points towards Tamworth and the battlefield is signposted in the dark brown which denotes all historical sites in the UK. Follow the signs, drive through Market Bosworth, go along the A555 until you almost reached Cadby and follow the crown signs for the visitors centre. The visitors centre is reached by a longish lane which is bannered on the left with the name of Bosworth. The lane is slightly uphill and the visitor is guided to a couple of smallish car parks. Parking costs £1.50 and there are signs all around about looking after your valuables and locking your car. The car parks are slightly higher than the visitor centre and the visitor walks down a short path into the centre. The first item is a mock medieval village which is being constructed in autumn 2010. The centre itself is a large square surrounded by low buildings; there is a restaurant, a tourist information room, toilets, gift shop and the heritage centre. There is also a information centre which costs £6 to enter and tells the visitor all about the battle, the history, the main players and where the events happened in the local vicinity. There are also interactive elements with vocal outputs from members of the army, Richard, Warwick, Henry Tudor etc. This is fun and keeps the kids interested but the main interest is the armour, swords, cannons etc which are examples of typical items used in 1485. There are some genuine pieces of battlefield relics, old shields, armour, coins, etc. £6 for this seemed a lot for an individual person, there are deals for families and under 3's go free. The battlefield Well as the name suggests the battle site is still a set of large fields, some of the borders are wooded and there is a nice walk between the site and the nearby Ambion Hill. Indeed, some historians think that the battle is nearer the hill than the site of the tourist centre. So, after walking around the centre it was nice to walk around the fields where such an important battle happened but when you get down to it it is a set of large fields with nothing really of interest. You can go on guided tours during the summer but they tend to be weekend based if you desire to know what happened and where. The battle is one of the most important events in English history but the site is to be a honest a bit dull, the centre is small and the interactive elements felt a bit steep for £6. Ultimately if the weather is nice and you want to go for a walk in some lovely Leicestershire countryside then its a nice place to visit. However, if you want more than its probably not the place for you.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        03.04.2002 07:00
        13 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Some 16 miles west of Leicester lies Bosworth field, scene of an epic clash between the royal houses of Tudor and Plantagenet more than five hundred years ago. t was here the King Richard III - unfairly immortalised as the evil hunchback king in Shakespeare's play - is said to have uttered his famous last words "A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!" as he scoured the battlefield for his rival to the throne, Henry of Richmond. Amazingly the battlefield - the last in the 30 year Wars of the Roses - has survived the march of time and visitors can amble around a 45 minute circular path following the ebb and flow of that fateful day. There is also a visitor centre and cafe to refresh weary legs. You can do the Battle Trail in either direction but go anti-clockwise to follow the unfolding battle on a series of well-presented information boards with diagrams showing where the armies stood at key times during the day. When Leicestershire County Council bought the land in 1973 there was some controversy about whether the battle was actually fought here at all. But most historians today agree it is the right site. On a warm day with clear blue skies you can see for miles and it is a lovely walk which you can enjoy for the scenery alone. Close your eyes and listen closely and you can almost hear the battle cries and ring of steel on steel. {The Battlefield} From the car park -£1 pay and display - head away from the Battlefield Visitor Centre towards a gravelled path suitable for buggies and wheelchairs. A short hop takes you to the brow of Ambion Hill where Richard unfurled his White Boar standard and deployed his 12,000-strong army on the eve of the battle in 1485. Look towards the church steeple in the nearby village of Market Bosworth and Henry's standard flutters in the wind to mark the spot where he pitched camp with his 6,000 troops. Follow the path down a gentle hill with sheep grazing on both sides and after a couple of minutes reach an information board for a battle update. In a bid to compensate for lack of numbers Henry seized the iniaitive by ordering his troops to advance across open fields towards Richard's forces. - their advance was directly in front of you. On his right flank - to your left on the hill - was Lord Stanley, a peer with 6,000 soldiers under his command, who was undecided about which army to back despite family connections to Henry. Richard's artillery - rudimentary canons - and archers opened up as Henry's forces came within range but were unable to fully halt the advance. Soon thousands of footsoldiers were engaged in bloody hand-to-hand combat on the slopes. Richard eventually gained the upper hand through sheer weight of numbers. Continue along the path as it sweeps gently westwards and after a quarter of a mile come to the spot which marks a crucial turning point of the battle. Henry, staring defeat in the face as his troops were swamped by Richard's superior forces, decided on one last gamble and galloped west to plead with Stanley to enter the fray on his side. Richard spotted the move from his hilltop vantage point and foolishly charged with 800 mounted bodyguards in a bid to catch Henry in the open. He was too late - Stanley threw in his lot with Henry and his troops crashed into the exposed flank of Richard's cavalry as they thundered down the hill. Continue along the path for about a quarter of a mile to Shenton railway station and cross the track to the ominous sounding "Richard's Field". Devastated by Stanley's surprise attack, Richard's cavalry was sent reeling. The king was unhorsed and his nobles begged him to retreat. But he refused and came face-to-face with Henry who cut him down. Legend has it his crown rolled into a bush. There is a small me morial - called the death stone - at the spot where Richard fell. Head back along the path to the station and walk through a small wood back up the hill. Near the brow is a stone memorial over King Dick's Well, the well where Richard is said to have drunk during the battle. {After the walk} At the visitors centre (a converted farmhouse) you can learn more about Henry and Richard, their troops (a large number of Welshmen served under Henry), and the aftermath of the battle. There are models of the combatants and a small exhibition of medieval weapons. There is also a short film about the battle. An attached giftshop sells the usual merchandise (keyrings, wooden swords, etc) but is redeemed by its well-stocked bookshelves. The nearby Battlefield Buttery serves hot snacks, cakes and drinks at reasonable prices. {Events} There are a number of weekend historical re-enactments at Bosworth each year. The big one takes place on August 17 & 18 when hundreds of enthusiasts will recreate the battle. {Prices} The country park is open all year round and admission is free. Tickets for the Batlefield Visitor Centre cost £3 for adults and £2 concessions. Between April 1 to October 31, the centre is open between 11am and 5pm daily. Different charges apply at special events. Guided walks take placde on the first Sunday of each month at 2.30pm. Adults £2, concessions £1. {How to find the battlefield} Bosworth Battlefield Visitor Centre and Country Park is 30 miles from Birmingham at Sutton Cheney, Nuneaton,Warwickshire. The battlefield, which is actually in Leicestershire, is bounded by the A5, A444, A447 and the B585 and is well signposed from these roads. {More info} Tel: 01455 290429. Email: bosworth@lecis.gov.uk Web: www.leics.gov.uk

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
          More Comments