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Pro-User RHD 620 - Rotary Hammer Drill

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1 Review

Brand: Pro-User

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      14.06.2001 06:35
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      I have just started on my house. We have lived here for 6 years and done virtually done nothing to rectify the dubious taste legacy from its previous owners. This summer we reached breaking point, and could no longer bear looking at the gaudy decor, and the botched attempts at DIY that we had put up with for so long. The first stage of work that needed doing was the removal of a couple of walls, and the ripping out of the fireplace. My dad had all the tools, as he needs them in his line of work, so instead of spending a fortune, I borrowed all the club hammers, sledge hammers, and stone chisels I could find. As I was about to leave, he took me to one side, pulled back some tarpaulin to reveal a large plastic carry case, and said 'I've never had need for this, its yours if you want it' Inside was the biggest drill I had ever seen. It weighed a ton, and was still gleaming at me in its factory-clean state. I had never really understand the masculine fascination with big power tools, but there was I drooling like a baby. I took it home and got it ready for use. First job was the fireplace. We had already stripped it of tiles, so now all it needed was the 2 rows of London brick removing from either side. The drill basically has 2 functions - A heavy duty drill, much like any handheld drill, and a jack-hammer type chiselling action. These functions are interchangeable via a dial at the top. The drill itself comes with a variety of bits. There were 3 stone-drill bits, 3 stone-chisel bits, and 2 pointed rock-breakers. These are very easy to interchange, as there is no chuck-key system. Apparently this 'SDS' system is very commonplace in modern tools, but I had never come across it before. You just have to pull down the sleeve mounting from the base of the bit already in place, and it comes loose, and simply replace with the new one. A jar of lubricating oil is also included. I chose the largest chisel bit and set to work. Initially, it went like a dream. The cement crumbled into sand, and the bricks fell out of the wall like harmless lumps of Lego. A job which seemed as though it was going to take all day was virtually over in about 10 minutes. But (there's always a but!) this was where things went badly wrong for my new 'toy'. This thing is a deathtrap. Whilst hammering, any circular twisting of the bit, either clockwise or counter-clockwise, which is quite easy when you are hammering away in awkward to reach areas, results in the drill automatically switching to rotary drill mode. If this happened whilst you were working, the whole thing shuddered to a halt. Fine, I had no problems with that, but if it happened when you had released the power switch, then you were given no warning at all. A further press of the power button resulted in the whole thing being wrenched out of your hands, spinning out of control until the power cut out. The first time it happened, it nearly tore my arms out of my sockets, never mind the near heart attack I suffered. Afterwards, the effective use of the drill was minimised, as I was so scared of using it to its full potential, that I was stopping and checking the control dial at the top every 5 or 6 seconds. It was a shame really, as otherwise this was a fantastic tool that I would not have hesitated to have given 5 stars to. One simple design flaw has re-affirmed my belief that it is true - you do get what you pay for. My dad payed £35 for this 12 months ago. Maybe if he had paid extra for Black & Decker or Bosch, then this would not have happened - but I don't know. I have just purchased some other tools to complete the house - A B&D jigsaw, and a circular sander, and a cheap unbranded Dremmel-style multitool. I will let you know how the demolition of my house continues.....

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