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    21 Reviews
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      06.06.2012 15:07

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      Great for the right acts

      I went to reading festival 2011 and I must admit speaking as someone who usually only does download festival I was quite impressed, the line up was fantastic, they had all the rock acts on one day which was great because I didn't have to sit through a bunch of acts I didn't like. Likewise if people don't like rock music they dont have to sit through anything they don't like. The main acts I went to see was 30 seconds to mars and my chemical romance, who both put on the best performance I have ever seen. The ticket prices were far cheaper than what I would have paid to see them both seperately!

      There were however a few downfalls to the location. The area was not really ready for rain, I know some people didn't mind it but walking through the camping site seeing all that mud I can imagine the tents can't have stayed up all too well. The toilet facilities were disgusting aswell. I have been to many festivals and I can safely say this was the worst for location. Trying to find your way in and out was nitemare too, not very well laid out at all.

      There was a huge variety of food stalls and merchandise available though and the security were mostly all friendly unlike some other places iv seen.

      On the whole I probably would not go again unless it was an act I absolutely had to see. Simply due to the layout. I only went because I had waited 9 years to see MCR! Performances were fantastic though and made the day!

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      23.09.2010 21:18
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      Don't go if you have an issue with drugs, dinking or sex.

      Reading Festival 2010!

      Where to even begin. Well I'll start with the camping. We camped in purple, a group of six, we got there on the wed with eary birds, good job we did to! Found a spot and even managed to save enough room in the middle of our tents for a gazebo. A perfect area for eating and chillaxing at the fest. The toilets in the campsite were pretty grim at the best of times, by the end of the week just walking with 100 feet of them would burn your nostrils! But needs must. It came to the point were if you were a guy you used the local 'stream' or a gal you held on untill you were in the main area to use the porta-loos.

      Weather: Well what else to expect of an English summer? Rain of course, but no-one let it dampen their spirits, seen as wellies are the most essential piece of festival fashion! So much water meant getting to our camp site involved wading through swaps which by the end of the week were covered with trash.

      Personal Hygiene: ..... Who has personal hygiene at festivals? Well the showers are acceptable if you remember your swim suit as they are communal or there are other options if you feel comfortable, for a quick clean up not much more can be asked.

      Food and Drink: £££££££££££££££££ Unless you recently won the lottery I would not advise eating or drinking in the main arena or outside if you are camping. *As long as drink is in plastic bottles then you are allowed to take it into the arena, so get those spirits in for cheap fun :)

      Music: Well where do I even begin. The music is fabulous, the reason I attended the festival, much to some festival goers dissapointment. Biggest let-downs.... The famous Guns and Roses, well done Axel Rose you have just lost around 100'000 fans due to your stupidity. They were an hour late on set, an hour of which the crowed were constantly booing and half of which left. I stayed for two songs then left to watch Marina and the Diamonds. The songs I did stay for were pretty bad IMO, he didn't perfom well and there was no atmosphere within the crowd. Biggest winner.....Pendulum were rather amazing, getting 20'000 people raving it up in the tent, the crowd an undulating ocean, playing big audience pleasing hits such as Witchcraft and Granite. Dizzee Rascal not some-one you generally expect to see at a rock and roll fest but he was the biggest crowd pleaser of the festival, the whole main stage was with him singing, he played his biggest hits and gave it his all.

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        13.11.2009 10:22
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        This is my pick of the British festivals. Enjoy it!

        I have been to Reading Festival 4 times - I was gutted that I couldn't go this year, but I've already bought my presale ticket for 2010 and I can't wait!

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        Who should go??
        =============

        Of course, your enjoyment of any festival is going to depend on your attitude to camping, who you're going with, how you feel about the line-up and so on. But the thing I really love about Reading is the amazing atmosphere (and I've been fortunate enough to only go when the weather has been pretty good!), which has been lacking from some other festivals I've been too - even when I preferred the music.

        I think the age range of Reading is anywhere between 16 annd 35 - my dad mocks me for being too old to be interested in festivals and I'm only 22! There do seem to be an increasing amount of tweenies (and emos!), but maybe it's just because I'm getting older rather than the crowd getting younger. It isn't that unusual to see rocker families with younger children there, either.

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        Price and ticket availability
        ==================

        I am disappointed at how expensive it has gotten in recent years, and how difficult it's become to get tickets. When I first went, my college friends and I spent an entire week after tickets were released working out the group logistics of borrowing our parents' credit cards; it took about a month for the tickets to sell out.

        Ever since then, I've gone for the presale option. The drawback is that you don't know the lineup (although, to be honest, when they are released in earnest at c.the end of March, you now already have to be on the phone *before* you even know who is playing to stand a chance of success), and now I am no longer a lazy student I don't know if I'll even be free for it. Also, unless you know other people who choose the presale route, you might find yourself spending the weekend alone in a field as no one else could get tickets! :)

        They've now stopped selling tickets at the box office on the day, although having queued for 7 hours among revellers who were getting steadily drunker/irritated, I wouldn't recommend doing that! But I have had to pick up my pre-ordered ticket from the box office in previous years as their useless courier service kept on flaking on arranged deliveries, so it is worrying to know that I couldn't do that any more. The organisers believe that they can 'stop the touts' by issuing tickets at the last possible moment, but this is really inconvenient (especially, as I've said, if you are no longer a lazy student!)

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        Parking & Camping
        =============

        You can pre-order car parking tickets, and I've been able to show up on the day and park before. The car parks are basically big fields - I wouldn't rate them for their security, and I remember well a car in the White carpark exploding in 2008! I've only ever parked in Green; from there, you can walk to a ferry port to take you to the site, but be prepared to wait. My biggest recommendation would be to either pack as light as possible or invest in some kind of trolly device, as it's *very* painful trying to lug two tents, a gazebo and a crate of beer up to the site! It's pretty easy to walk in to town, or to Lidl, so it's a much ebtter idea to set up and then stock up.

        Reading gets top marks for it's camping facilities. If you pay a little extra for early entry, or get there *really* early on Thursday, you should have no trouble finding a large spot to set up a little 'camp'. Unlike at Download, all the camp sites are an easy distance from the Arena. You also get a choice of sites that have their own particular reputation - for example, yellow is the stay-up-all-night-and-party camp, so avoid at all cost if you intend to sleep and go for green instead!

        When I last went you were also allowed to have a gazebo, which is good for letting you have a good night even if it's raining (though watch out for gazebo-theives!)

        =========
        In the Arena
        =========

        ...it is EXPENSIVE! And you're not allowed to bring any alcohol in - I have seen some pretty inventive ways of trying to get around that rule, though!

        It can be quite a throng to get in, especially just before it starts and also before any big name acts. If you really want to see a band, I'd recommend leaving a bit of time to actually get in.

        The security staff are reasonably pleasant and patient, given the circumstances, but of course if you show up high and start mouthing off they won't let you in.

        The Arena is massive, with a fair few stages and tons of bars and eateries - I would recommend buying a lanyard, they're a bit of a rip-off but it's useful to have the map.

        The Festival is excellent because of it's variety, you are sure to find something there to suit your tastes. The fact that they also have things like comedy shows makes it feel like a proper festival, rather than just a music event.

        As I mentioned before, the atmosphere is just excellent, even from early on in the day. They do a good job of getting bands on who are really suited to playing festivals and psych the crowd up (although I have to say that some of the headliners I've seen have been really boring - a number one album + popular radio ditty does not make you good at getting the crowd going). For the most part, Reading normally gets the best headliner on the Sunday (sorry, Leeds!) which means that the festival finishes on a real high.

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        Summary
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        I've tried to give my general thoughts without too much consideration for who is playing, as obviously next year's line-up is anyone's guess. But as long as the weather holds up for me next year I'm sure I'll have a thoroughly enjoyable if very expensive weekend reliving my yoof!

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          26.09.2009 12:24
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          A music lover's dream

          The Reading and Leeds Festivals take place simultaneously on the Friday, Saturday and Sunday of the August Bank Holiday every year. Thought to be the world's oldest popular music festival still in existence, highlights from Reading have included The Who, Eric Clapton, Nirvana's last UK appearance and The Stone Roses last show together.

          Having attended back in 2001 (acts included Manic Street Preachers, Marilyn Manson and Eminem); I returned this year, lured by another quality line-up headlined by The Kings of Leon, The Artic Monkeys and, one of my personal favourites, the mighty Radiohead.

          Tickets

          Despite advice to use only licensed ticket sellers, I went to www.theonlineticketexchange.com. My advice is simple. Don't. After (hindsight is a wonderful thing) shelling out over £500 for two weekend tickets, I searched for online reviews of the company and found out they were basically a bunch of crooks. After failing to receive a confirmation email of my booking I tried emailing and phoning the company with little success except for a vague email reply saying all the tickets would be sent out nearer the event. Several months of nail-biting followed. A week or so before, I received an email informing me I would have to collect them at the venue (which, according to the online reviews is standard practice). The day before, another email gave me a mobile phone number to ring. On the morning of the event we travelled up to meet the ticket seller in a car park outside TGIs. "You can't miss it", I was told. Well, I could and I did. Thanks to the miracle of Sat Nav, we managed to navigate our way through the festival traffic to TGIs and, feeling slightly like a shady drug dealer, hand over the money for our tickets. I have no complaint about the money I spent, I know I paid over the odds, but I knew how much I was paying and would happily pay a similar amount again. What I didn't enjoy was the worrying about whether the tickets were going to arrive. Normally I would do loads of research into the bands that were playing, maybe visit a few websites and buy a couple of CDs. Due to the uncertainty, I arrived at the venue barely sure who the headline acts would be. My advice would be - go with the vendors the official festival site recommends. If you absolutely must use somebody else, do research into the company.

          Accommodation

          People say that by staying in a hotel, you miss out the festival experience. If the festival experience involves lying on muddy ground, listening to the delicate sounds of men urinating outside your tent intermingled with the pleasant aromas of fresh vomit, then I'll give it a miss every time. I stayed in the Millennium Copthorne Hotel just outside Reading. I will do a full review later, but basically it was cheap, clean, welcoming and quite impressive, if slightly corporate. Also, one of the local taxi firms has got a deal with the festival, meaning that you never have to pay over a £15 to get there or back.

          The Festival Site

          The site itself is fairly impressive, boasting 6 stages - The Main Stage, The NME/Radio 1 Stage, The Dance/Lock Up Stage/Cinema, The Alternative Stage, The Festival Republic Stage and The BBC Introducing Stage. There are also shops selling various merchandise and other amenities - cash point, chemist, lockers, showers etc.

          Considering the amount of people on site (reckoned to be 80000 per day), it is kept reasonably tidy as there are clever schemes in place meaning you can get beer tokens or money off vouchers for returning/collecting beer cans, paper cups and other items of litter. This explains the new festival phenomenon - young kids running around with almighty towers of empties taller than themselves.

          Programmes

          Expensive at £10 each, but an invaluable source of information. With over 150 bands spread over the three days, you'll need to know who's on when. It's actually a fairly decent read anyway.

          Food and Drink

          Plenty of choice - including chicken and chips, donuts, pizzas, noodles, baguettes, Chinese and all the other usual suspects. Prices are high but no longer extortionate - there is a new policy whereby sellers have to keep their products to certain limits. Expect to pay about £10 for a meal and a beer.

          Toilets

          The Festival toilets are an experience in themselves. Proof that a few pints can undo millions of year's worth of evolution. Basically you s**t in a pit. That's as advanced as it gets. It smells. It's messy. People forget to bother aiming and spray up the walls. It's not pleasant. If you absolutely must use them, remember to bring your own toilet paper, because you won't be able to find any on site.

          Music

          This is only an opinion, but having first-hand experience of all the major festivals, I have always considered Reading to have the best line-up. It's a real music lover's festival with a mix of rock, indie and dance. The great and not so great at this year's festival included:
          The King's Of Leon - Bland and overrated. Would have been better in one of the big tents, as I thought they were slightly out of their depth. Had a bizarre rant at the festival crowd who they claimed seemed to be "Sick of the Kings of Leon". At least they got something right.
          Kaiser Chiefs - Not my favourite band, but gave a really great performance. I've seen them three times and they've always been entertaining and well received. The ideal festival band. Kings of Leon should take note
          Glasvegas - I gave the Artic Monkeys a miss to watch this particular band and was well rewarded. Their sound filled the Radio 1 stage.
          Radiohead - My personal highlight was the last performance on the last night. I've seen Radiohead once before and was slightly disappointed, but this time they were simply awesome, dominating the stage with their vast back-catalogue of hits. New songs featured heavily but were played with real gusto, whilst the old hits also made some rare appearances - including Just, Creep and the epic Paranoid Android
          White Lies - Formed in October 2007, this "post-punk" (whatever that is) band were my find of the festival.
          Vampire Weekend - A band I was looking forward to seeing. Their upbeat poppy melodies really lifted the crowd
          Placebo - With a huge back catalogue, Placebo were a real stand out band and gave a top class performance
          The sound was of very good quality compared to other festivals and big gigs I've been to, but did seem quite quiet from the main stage unless you were right at the front.

          Other Entertainment

          The Alternative Stage, hosting a collection of comedians and poets of varying quality (plus a bizarre yet entertaining hypnotist and his dog), provides a welcome diversion from wall to wall music and is well worth a visit or two.

          Organisation

          The camp site is divided into five coloured zones each one with a Zone Manager and Campsite Assistant Teams (CATS). These were friendly, but not always particularly helpful, as I spent over an hour in the first night wandering around in the dark trying to find an exit. Some signs would have been useful.

          Other than that, the event seemed very well organised - although there are always inevitable problems with drugs, crime and violence, I didn't see any major problems myself.

          As people arrive at different times throughout the days, the queues to get in weren't too bad and I didn't spend too long waiting to get my wristband.

          Summary

          A great experience and a top atmosphere throughout. I discovered some new bands and fell back in love with an old favourite. As a music lover I couldn't ask for much more. I was thoroughly entertained throughout the whole weekend and can't wait to go again!

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            15.09.2009 06:18
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            You MUST attend this festival if you haven't already, but don't over do it.

            READING FESTIVAL 2009

            Some bizarre things happen when you attend Reading Festival having turned 25 in the same month - the festival goers have all suddenly turned into children high on TopMan and attitude; the line up is backward; sleeping in a noisy, smelly field suddenly loses its charm; and this year, the security seemed to be taking their inspiration from the Nazi occupation of France. 'Excuse me, but do you have the necessary papers for this 100ml can of dry shampoo?'

            Don't get me wrong, I've loved my Reading experiences in previous years and have been just as enthusiastic with the drinking and getting involved in the all round bonkers behaviour that the place instils in people. The festival is An Event (notice the capital letters) and if you've never been before, you need to go, regardless of your age.

            But after four years on the trot and having just crossed into the darker side of my 20's, can Reading offer me the same excitement any more?

            I think I've reached a point now where I no longer look upon a heavily drunk/drugged 17 year old as a 'crazy little nutter' but as a total nuisance. Wandering around the camp site and main arena this year didn't have the same atmosphere as I'd experienced in previous years and people seemed to have developed a lot more 'attitude'. Not only that, but the 'free hugs' dude has seriously lost his charm. Reading has always been infamous for spontaneous acts of destruction, but usually to the toilets rather than each other. This was the first year I'd seen people want to have fights with each other. It was like somebody had shaved a bunch of chimps, dumped them through TopMan and injected them with concentrated attitude. The thing I loved about Reading in previous years was the desire everybody had to get talking to complete strangers as if they'd been friends for years. I have at least two good friends who started out as Reading Randoms, but this year I didn't really get that vibe. People seemed more interested in outdoing each other in the attitude stakes.

            The line up for Reading is always stellar, if getting a little samey. This is partly my fault for going constantly over the last four years or so. But, I don't ever remember a day when I could get away with snoozing until 4 in the afternoon and not worrying about missing anything too important. I also don't understand how they can justify some of the headline acts. It's pure madness that Arctic Monkeys headlined over The Prodigy, in my opinion. (Somebody did tell me that this was due to The Prodigy headlining at another festival... which, if that is the case, is a ridiculous rule and needs chucking away immediately). This isn't a rant about music taste here either - The Prodigy are an epic dance act, whatever you feel about them, and with over ten years at the top of their game, you would have thought they would have been obvious choice for headliners, regardless of whatever other festivals they have headlined this year. It was no surprise that they drew one of the largest festival crowds I had ever seen. I even thought this a couple of years ago, when they opted to put Razorlight over the Kings of Leon. They did get it right with Radiohead, and while not a very big fan myself, were worthy headliners, especially as tickets for their shows can cost about 60 quid a pop.

            Camping at the Reading festival is always going to be grim, and because everybody is in the same position, is equally as much a part of the experience as the bands. You'd make sure that you got drunk enough so that you could sleep through anything and that would see you good for the following day. That just wasn't happening for me this year, and my desire for a warm bed and clean toilets was jumping up and down at me as early as day two. I'd go to sleep freezing, wondering if I'd live to see the morning, only to wake up so hot that all that was left of me was a salt outline of my face. To be fair though, this is the territory when it comes to camping, but I just didn't have the patience for it this year. While the weekend ticket is incredible value for money, I'm beginning to look at the overall cost of the festival and think that I could put this money towards a weekend break away with my girlfriend, somewhere warm, comfortable and clean.

            I guess my final rant is at the security staff this year. Previous years have seen the security in place to make sure people are safe and not doing anything that would result in major disaster, but in general took a hands-off approach and the vast majority responded in kind. This year, however, they seemed to have some kind of vendetta against everybody. Me and my friends are all in our mid-twenties, and possess stoves in a bid to make a breakfast a more civilised affair than downing a can of Strongbow, not to blow up a tent; dry shampoo as a short cut to semi-respectable hair and deodorant to hide the fact that we haven't had a proper wash for a couple of days, not to chuck on camp fires. Yet, as far as the security were concerned, all were potential ingredients for some kind of fantasy terrorist attack that they were all trying to avert. They used no judgement when it came to confiscating our aerosol 'contraband' and I found the whole thing utterly ridiculous and ill-planned. Besides, what is the difference between 1 can of 100ml dry shampoo, and 2 cans of 50ml? The whole plan was an utter failure, as on the Sunday, in response to the over-zealous nature of the security, everybody went totally loco and huge fires sprang up all over the place. Security, in all their wisdom, decided the best course of action was to stamp out the fires of innocent festival goers trying to keep warm, and in one instance, hurling abuse in the face of one girl who had the 'audacity' to ask why they weren't dealing with the real problem and stamping out tiny, controlled fires. I think their response was 'p*** off and let us do our jobs'. Badly, I might add. Security's ridiculous actions were compounded during a conversation I had with a guy who had come to the festival with his mate and his two grown up children. He owned an old style American fire fighters jacket, clearly an item not part of any British fire brigade and obvious enough to anybody with a brain cell that it was just an item of clothing that existed for its retro appeal, nothing more. On one occasion, he told me, his son was wearing the jacket, accompanied by a pirates hat. Security told him to turn the jacket inside out, as he was IMPERSONATING A FIREMAN. That's some impersonation, if your jacket is 1) classed as a relic 2) not native to this country and 3) accompanied by a pirates hat. Utterly ridiculous, and it is no wonder that people decided to take things a little further on the Sunday than usual.

            To be honest, I am giving the festival a bit of a hard time. It's a brilliant experience and for what you get, it is definitely worth the money. I believe I've made the mistake of going year after year, and my advice to people new to festivals would be to take a break every one or two years, or at the very least, try a different festival. I'm pretty certain I will attend Reading again one day, but the old saying 'you can have too much of a good thing' definitely applies here, as if I had written this review last year, or the year before, it would be in a totally different mood to how it is now and 5 stars wouldn't be anywhere near a high enough rating.

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              13.09.2009 21:38
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              youll have an amazing time

              Reading Festival Is Amazing!

              The Bands
              -------------
              In the 2009 line up, headliners included Kings of Leon, Arctic Monkeys and Radiohead. There are a LOT of bands covering the three days, and with the lock-up stage- for followers of a heavier beat, and the dance stage, to the NME tent, there is something for everyone- though mostly the big bands will be big mainstream indie bands. I know a lot of my friends who went as well as me and our tastes are very varied, so it is proof that there is a great variety at reading. There are about 5 or 6 stages in all with bands playing from about 12pm - 11.30pm over 3 days.

              The Camping
              ----------------
              Yes, it's a festival; you will be unclean. No, you won't be able to wash your hair. But it's ok! Baby Wipe wash is acceptable and you won't be the only one feeling slightly grubby. At least it doesn't get hot enough to be sweaty. The great thing about the camping is the sort of community festival spirit which comes with it. The pride for your camp, and the fact that you can walk up to anyone and start talking about whatever nonsense you want to adds to the fun and randomness. Because lets face it, you're both be too wasted to really care.

              Things nearby to the festival grounds
              -----------------------------------------------
              There is an ASDAs and a Waitrose near the campsite though most people go to ASDA. And it feels like a luxury. Its good for getting stocked up on crates of cans and food for your camp as no one can afford the £4 for a cheeseburger that the stalls provide! Though a word of warning, you can;t take glass into the campsite, so make sure you buy cheap bottle of sparking water you can pour wine into if you are buying that.

              Pro Tips and What is Necessary
              ----------------------------------------
              Baby Wipes for washing getting the dirt off everything.
              Fem Fresh wipes if like me, you have female parts attached to your body.
              Money for food and drinks, I spent around £80 though my boyfriend spent £50. But I did treat myself to the £4 burger a couple of times.
              Something to wear in the heat and also the cold - a big hoodie as well as denim shorts.
              Wellies - you don't have to bring these, I didnt and its not muddy, but a lot of girls wear them either Hunter wellies for rich indie wannabe pixie lotts, or flowery lurid ones. personally i wore slip on patent lace ups which fell apart and then got taped up with electric wire tape for that lo-fi look.
              A clean set of clothes in a bag to wear home - u wont regret it.
              Deodrant and body Sprays - to cover up the smell.
              Hair accesories - because at least if your hair looks like a big pile of knots, dress it like its supposed to look like that.
              Interesting accesories/hats/glasses- festival fashion means you can wear really weird things without looking like an idiot. Well, you will look like an idiot.. but it will be more acceptable..

              HAVE FUN

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              • More +
                05.09.2009 19:48

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                Great, fun festival

                The 2009 festival was the first Reading festival I have attended, and I had a great time. Good atmosphere, good music, crap food: what more could you want?!

                Price/value for money: As a student, money IS an issue, but for 175 pounds, you do see some worldclass acts. A radiohead concert sets you back 50 pounds, as would arctic monkeys and kings of leon no doubt, so thats 150 pounds covered already! Of course camping is included, as is access to all the amenities, which includes a cheesy club (great fun) and a silent disco. All in all, although expensive, it is worth the price.

                Line up: this year was a stellar line up, the three headliners very impressive and a lot of the 'support' acts brilliant as well, including florence and the machine, kaiser chiefs and bloc party. There are 5 tents/stages, so you're spoilt for choice and there is something for most anyone, though if you love girls aloud this festival might not be for you, as it is definitely geared towards those who love rock and indie music.

                Crowd: The crowd is mostly 16/17-25 year olds, and anyone younger or older may feel slightly out of place! The atmosphere is very friendly, though on the last night there are riots and tent burning due to copious consumption of alcohol. Never fear, there's plenty of police and helpers on site to keep it under control!

                A brilliant festival, great fun, though Glastonbury still reigns in my opinion!

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                03.09.2009 20:59
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                Bring back the Reading experience of previous years!

                Every year, during the August Bank Holiday, thousands of like-minded people descend on the town of Reading for one reason only; Reading Festival. Attracting around eighty thousand fans each year, this festival is famous and continues to attract many huge acts year after year. The festival, as we know it now, has been around since the 1970s (excluding a few years during which it hit a slump and people stopped attending and the dissolution of sponsorship from Carling).

                Cost: This is probably the downer of the whole festival scenario. Unfortunately tickets don't come cheap anymore, especially when the festival is as popular as Reading, but if we break it down then we can begin to see that maybe it isn't as overpriced as it initially looks. With your weekend ticket, you get access to the camp site and a wristband that lets you see all the bands that are playing from Friday afternoon to Sunday night; if the average price of a gig is £20 and you see 5 bands a day, it would ordinarily cost you £300 (if we keep it at 5 bands a day). However, for around the £180 mark, you are able to camp from Thursday to the Monday morning and get access to unlimited music. Quite a bargain if we look at it that way!

                Purchasing Tickets: Because of the massive level of hype surrounding the festival, tickets can be sold out within a matter of hours following on from the General Release. If you are quick then tickets are sold for the following years festival immediately after the current festival ends and you will also get it at the current price (possibly positive if the ticket prices inflate). However, the downside to this is that you may be paying to see bands that you detest and things can change over the course of the year. So, onto the General Release tickets. These are usually sold in March/April, and for the few years I've attended, they have gone on sale at 7.30pm on a weekday evening. In the lead-up to buying the tickets, Radio 1 do announcements so you will know when to buy tickets. There are various ways to buy your tickets:

                · Online retails- I've got my tickets from online ticket retails 3 times before and I have never had a problem with them. However, the major websites will inevitably crash as the bandwidth is swamped and scams are also commonplace so I must stress to go for a big retailer such as Seetickets or Ticket Master. If you purchase a ticket via Ebay then there is the possibility that it could be a scam, and the sellers tend to grossly over-inflate the ticket prices as the hype grows.
                · Over the phone- I've never purchased a ticket through this method so can't talk about it in too much detail. However, the phone lines are generally swamped on release night.
                · Retailers- Selected HMV stores in the UK do sell tickets but I've found that this only seems to happen in the large UK cities. However, if you get there early enough (usually on the morning after the release) then it is possible to buy a ticket without the stress of crashing web pages. Smaller retailers do occasionally sell tickets as well, as I found out one year to my surprise. Just shop around!

                Your ticket won't be delivered until the August, even if you purchase it immediately so don't worry when it doesn't instantly arrive!

                Getting to Reading: Your location in the country determines how you are able to get to the festival. The most convenient option (I've personally found) is the train via London; it is quick and cheap if booked in advance. From the train station, the festival ground is only around a 10/15 minute walk which is quite reasonable. However, there is a cheap and efficient coach service with National Express that is in place specifically for festival goers, and there are on-site car parking facilities if you wish to drive yourself. Please note that you do need to buy a car parking pass in advance and these often sell out quite quickly.

                Festival Facilities: On the festival site, there are numerous facilities in place to make your experience as enjoyable as possible (oh ho!), including the infamous toilets. There are a LOT of toilets on both the camp site and in the arena so you often won't be far away from them. However, they are undeniably smelly, dirty so go in wearing strong perfume on your wrist (my tip!) to mask some of the smell. And take your own toilet roll in with you- there is no guarantee that there'll be any in there. There are also showering facilities in the camping site just in case you want to attempt to cleanse yourself.

                In the arena, there are four stages you can go to in order to see the various acts that are playing throughout the duration of the Bank Holiday:

                · Main Stage
                · Radio 1 Tent
                · Lock-up/Dance Arena
                · Alternative Arena (comedy, spoken word etc)

                All of these tents are in easy walking distance of each other so you can always keep check on who you want to see, and how long you'll have to wait before dashing off to another stage.

                There is also a signing tent in which you can meet various bands, get photos with them and get them to sign various parts of your body if you wish ;) This is a free service but queues are expected and there is no guarantee you'll get to meet your favourite act so get there early!

                Food is important at a festival and you are definitely not in short supply of eating facilities at Reading. For a burger, you can be expected to pay around the £3.00 mark; food is often overpriced and isn't delicious but there are a few rare treats amongst the rubbish (such as a fresh milkshake stall- love it!). However, the more exotic or fresh the food, the more you'll probably have to pay. There is always the option of taking some food with you so you spend less at the festival but if you're travelling light, there are foods of every type available to buy.

                Finally, there is now a fairground on the campsite for festival goers. This is expensive but if you're looking for some more thrills to add to your festival then this is a neat little addition.

                Opinion: I used to love Reading Festival but unfortunately it seems to have already have hit a high note, and now the deterioration has started. The ticket prices are always increasing, despite having pretty much the same facilities available each year, and I feel that the music just isn't cutting it anymore. The last time I went (2008), the headliners were Rage Against The Machine, The Killers and Metallica, and unfortunately this year it has hit a bum note. The music seems to have been altered to suit the mainstream "pop rock" crowd (not in every instance, I might add, but often) and as someone who is into hard-rock and more obscure bands, I feel disappointed at the sudden drop in standard.

                The vibe of the campsite, and the way the security is managed, is also something that needs to be changed. It seems more and more common to set fire to tents, and generally just ruin the laid back feeling that a festival should create, and the security they hire take a hard-hitting stance to even small issues of injuries etc.

                Until certain factors change, I won't go back to Reading. It's disappointing but I refuse to spend around £300 for a weekend of being pushed around by bullies in uniforms and watching bands that are easy enough to see on tour in many venues. Bring back that special vibe that made me love Reading and you'll regain a die-hard festival goer but until then, bon voyage Reading Festival.

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                  29.06.2009 23:00
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                  Great bands = Great festival

                  Where do I start with the Reading festival...

                  I went to my first (and only) Reading festival last year, I decided to go with many of my mates from uni plus a few from back home, we got a 12 man tent on ebay and slept 10 of us in there, the headliners last year were Killers, Rage Against The Machine and Metcallia whilst the cost of the tickets cost near enough £200 (including early entry).

                  **Cost**

                  Thats the major downside with this festival, the cost of around £170 to get in, the cost of the tent, merchenside, travel to and from the site as well as food and drink when you get there.

                  All in all I probably spent £300+ on the weekend, £40 was on merchendise, £30/40 odd on food, £50 odd on travel to and from as well as the £170 tickets, this makes for a very expensive trip, it's possible to go on holiday to Spain for a few days for that sort of cost I imagine (minus much spending there).

                  Thats the bad bit out of the way, was it worth the money is the important question.


                  **Getting there/Camping**

                  As stated we got a 12 man tent from ebay to stay in for 8 of us, there were 4 compartments each sleeping 2 people, we arrived from the station on the wednesday after getting a taxi between 4 each to the campsite from the station which was a 4/5 minute drive.

                  The walking from getting dropped off from the taxi to the campsite was horrible, I ended up being chosen to take the huge tent amongst other things and almost fainted from exhaustion having to lump a big tent around, on a trolley thing which wheels were crap...the walk in total took about 20/30 minutes walking in dry mud which kept knocking the tent over...cue much frustration from me.

                  Anyway, we set up easily enough in the Yellow camp, we camped fairly close to the road so it was easy enough to find our tent in amongst the others, the first few days consisted of staying up late, checking the merchendise around the venue and eating (and for the others, drinking).

                  The camping aspect had got a little tiresome during late thursday, I just wanted the music to start which it did on the friday, camping during the nights was hard as people came around shouting it was hard to get to sleep (especially sleeping next to someone who pees ever 2 hours!), the sunday was the worst though, late night there was what sounded like riots going on all over the place, luckily I was knackered and although I could definatly hear everything late sunday night I somehow just fell asleep, through no real effort, it just happend.

                  We woke up the next day to hear more screaming, burning, throwing etc. although probably the best thing i've ever heard as some 15 year old chav started to shout "someone find me a can, I wanna stab a can".

                  Overall the camping with mates was fairly cool, although the amount of people meant it wasn't very personal, eating rubbish and not showering for 5 days wasn't my cup of tea either though although the experience was brilliant.

                  Overall, I'm not sure if I would camp again from the wednesday, late thursday I just wanted the music to start but obviously to get a good place the earlier the better, sleeping was the hardest with a load of pre-pubescant teenagers running around outside, sunday night I was actually slightly scared...so, camping, fun with mates, good laughs around the campfires...not so much for 5 days in a row and in such a busy environment.


                  **The Music**

                  This is the main aspect as well all know, forget the camping, you pay £170 to see some bands and for the atmostphere, the campings just an integral part of it...so, were the bands worth the money and is the atmostphere all it was cracked up to be?

                  The friday involved bands such as QOTSA and Rage on the main stage, now, I wasn't too sure on Rage, I hadn't been a big fan but had been told by many people how much this gig meant to them and to the many around me, for that reason I stayed to watch what actually turned out to be a mega set, the atmostphere during Bulls on Parade was electric and even more so during Killing in the name of.

                  QOTSA seemed a little flat for my liking, perhaps it was due to the sound troubles that the whole weekend had, obviously their well known hits went down a storm but other than that it wasn't so much the performance I was expecting.

                  The best bands of the day for me though were Biffy Clyro and The Enemy, for 2 very different reasons, Biffy were just superb, a few of us were right in the front for it and it was the busiest it had been all day and everyone just going for it during their set, The Enemy however involved the best baguette (and may I add only) fight I have witnessed, as over head around a thousand pieces off baguette were being chucked back and forth between the front and the back...involving being struck a few times, me.

                  The saturday was the day I was looking forward to the most, my favourite band were playing the lock up tent, The Gaslight Anthem, the highlight of the weekend for me being at the front to witness for the first time my favourite band playing in the UK (bar a small gig the night before), the set was brilliant and immediatly after I went and bought a T-Shirt (for around £15), The Killers and Raconteurs on the main stage were the big names of the day other than that, The Killers I was slightly dissapointed with, Raconteurs though were excellent.

                  The sunday I was very excited about seeing the main stage, Slipknot and Avenged pulled out (no crying from me there), which left 2 of the best bands of the weekend supporting Metallica, Feeder were just brilliant and their big hits were some of the biggest sung anthems of the weekend, I was up on the shoulders of a mate singing along to Buck Rogers, it was an electric atmostphere during their set and the crowd just loved Tenecious D who were up next, their story telling set was brilliant involving a song about a train, due to the train tracks near the field.

                  I went back to the tent during Metallica because I just wasn't getting into them at all but witnessed the pyrotechnics and fireworks from our tent to bring to an end the festival...now, was it worth it.

                  Over the weekend I saw 17 bands for what ended up being around £300, this is just under £20 per band, adding on the costs of actually getting to and from 17 separate bands the actual costs is likely to be around £25+ (much more for bands such as the Killers/Rage), so say an average of £30 a ticket.

                  £30 - One band,
                  £500 - 17 bands separatly

                  vs

                  £300 - 17 bands (plus others if you wanted)

                  For me thats a good enough deal isn't it, well, it's not unless you enjoyed the bands so lets see how many of the 17 bands I liked, 11 of the bands I saw I thought were brilliant, which means if we take the £30 a ticket system:

                  11 bands, £30 each = £330

                  Even purchasing merchendise, food and trval to Reading this costs less than seeing those bands seperatly, so it has to be said that the cost of the ticket and staying at Reading for 5 days does indeed look fairly cheap when thinking about it that way.

                  The atmostphere, especially in the lock up tent was very very good, especially during Feeder, Bloc Party and Rage on the main stage also.


                  **Overall**

                  Well, I have established that it's worth the money, if their are bands you really want to see, which there was for me luckily, however, as I have previously mentioned I don't think I would camp from the wednesday again, turning up on the friday would reduce costs even firther with early entre tickets, food, drink ec.

                  Bands, Brilliant
                  Camping, Brilliant with mates, not showing/food a disadvantage
                  Company, some idiots but thats to be expected

                  Not much else to say, IF there are 10+ bands you want to see, plus a load of smaller bands you wish to check out or just scope out at random times it's very much worth the money, some people aren't great campers so there are day tickets available but but £80 odd for a day is also fairly expensive (although again, not when comparing individual ticket prices).

                  The weekend for me was great, the experience was very good and I got to see some brilliant bands i'd never have otherwise got to, including the first time of me seeing my favourite band (having since been another 2 times to see them).

                  This is a great music festival if you're willing to live with it and camp...

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                    15.06.2009 14:38

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                    BEST TIME EVER

                    Reading Festival was the best weekend of my entire life. I made some of the best memories there. My passion for music has become even stronger now after seeing so many amazing bands...RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE & THE KILLERS, were truley breath taking. Everyone was so friendly and up for a laugh, there isn't a bad word i could say about the festival, the spirit and atmostphere among everyone was so friendly.

                    Reading gave me a time in my life where nothing mattered and i honestly didnt care about anything. I was the happiest i had EVER been and I was so sad to come home. Reality kicked in ...:( and Reading 09 has kept me going since then. I would recommend the festival to anyone with a passion for music or anybody whos hardcore enough for 3 days of madness and FREEDOM.

                    I LOVE READING WITH MY HEART, SOUL & EVERYTHING INBETWEEN.

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                    27.05.2009 12:09
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                    great weekend out. make sure you know the weather forcast!

                    The Reading festival is one of many rockass festivals that take place in the pride of Britain every year. Everyone loves Reading festival (well, all of those that love that type of music and love festivals). I attended the 2007 Reading festival and only stayed for the one day- not because it was rubbish but because that's all i could afford. Red hot chili peppers were headlining that day with supporting bands throughout the day consisting of;
                    Panic! at the disco
                    Block Party
                    Arcade fire
                    Paramore

                    and many more.

                    The thing that i love about Reading festival is that there's something for everyone. If you don't like the line-up on main stage there are 4 other stages in which you can see whats going on! Including Radio one's stage!
                    Also another thing i love is how you know that you're in a community is which you share a passion of music.

                    I would highly reccomend Reading festival if you are a fan of festivals or even a first timer! And the mini doughnut stalls are the best! Great weekend out!

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                      09.05.2009 14:19
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                      okay if your under 20

                      Reading festival takes place over August bank holiday every year, and the line up is identical with Leeds festival, also that weekend.

                      The Line up - Reading's line up is a combination of Indie, pop, metal, emo, electo-rockish and dance. Which in itself is quite the combination. Last year (2008) i saw bands which varied from MGMT, Justice to Metallica and Rage aginst the Machiene, with some Killers, Bloc Party and Biffy Clyro chucked in for good measure.

                      The atmosphere - I went to reading when i was 21,and to be honest i felt quite old. There was alot of 16-18 year olds who obviously do not drink that much acting quite annoying and immature, which i find can be quite off putting. At Reading you have to suffer the mosh pits at pretty much any band you see, also bottle fights! However theres a great buzz from thousands of peopel who want to see some great music.

                      Toilets - One word disgusting. Flooded in a couple of days, stank. Also the last day of teh festival its tradion to rip them down, so you will find yourself pissing in a cup!

                      Getting there - my advice, walk from Reading station, not that far really. Waiting for the boat ride is long and aggrivating, i spent hours ina cue and the walk back only took us approx 30 minutes.

                      Concluding - I think Reading is a good festival when it comes to the acts, but atmosphere lets the festival down really. Im more a glastonbury fan, its more chilled out, your loos wont get ripped apart and you wont eb kicked in teh face by some idiot at a gig.

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                        29.03.2009 20:22
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                        I'm going again this year hopefully!

                        Reading and Leeds Festival are on the August bank holiday every year. The same bands play both Reading and Leeds, just on different days. It is a three day festival, starting on Friday and ending on Sunday, although if you're camping, you can stay on the Thursday night and leave on the Monday morning. (Early bird tickets can also be purchased when you can stay from the Wednesday...)

                        According to Wikipedia, Reading Festival (as we know it today) begun in 1971, and Leeds did not join them until 1999! Despite this, the two festivals have grown in popularity and sell out very quickly, the 2008 festival selling out in less than 2 hours!

                        --------------------

                        TICKETS:

                        Tickets can be pretty difficult to get. As I said before, the 2008 festival sold out within 2 hours, and this meant the phone lines were jammed, the websites were slow, and to get tickets you had to be extremely lucky.

                        There are two types of ticket, a weekend ticket, and a day ticket. Last year the weekend tickets came in at around £155 I believe, giving you access to the campsite as well as the arena. A day ticket will set you back around £65 I think, but I'm not certain on this as I didn't have day tickets, and postage, packaging and the usual handling fees etc have to be added on to the cost.

                        It's also possible to buy 'Early bird' tickets for £10 which gives you an extra night of camping, and time to find a decent spot to pitch your tent and things. I didn't do this last year, but wish I had because we ended up around half an hour away from the arena!

                        The line up is released literally seconds before the tickets go on sale. This is very frustrating because you don't really have time to look at the line-up and think 'Do I want to go...?' because if you spend too long contemplating, it'll be sold out! This is a big downside of Reading & Leeds festivals!

                        ---------------------

                        STAGES:
                        As of last year the different stages at Reading Festival are as follows:

                        - Main Stage

                        This is where the major rock/indie/alternative etc acts play. 2008's headliners for this stage were Metallica, The Killers and Rage Against The Machine. Other acts from 2008 were Tenacious D, Dizzee Rascal (?!? I don't know why either...) Bloc Party, The Fratelli's, Plain White T's, Biffy Clyro and many more! This is obviously the biggest stage, and generally the most popular, although there are some bands in the NME tent which many people usually flock to see!

                        - NME/Radio 1 Stage

                        This is usually bands that are still fairly well known, but not as major and 'important' as the acts on the Main Stage. 2008's headliners for this stage were Babyshambles, Manic Street Preachers and The Cribs. Other acts from 2008 were The Wombats, Pendulum (absolutely MENTAL... they should have been Main Stage to save so many people being crushed.), Bullet For My Valentine, The Ting Tings, Hadouken, Vampire Weekend and more. This is basically a really huge tent, with a decent sized stage inside. I personally think it's too small, because many of the bands playing in the NME tent are usually pretty popular.

                        There is also an NME signing tent, where various bands go to sign stuff for people. To be honest, although I'm sure it's amazing if your favourite band is there, it looked like a bit of a waste of time. The queues look excessive, and I think I'd rather spend my time watching other bands, personally. Although I'm sure it's something that some people would not want to miss.

                        - Festival Republic Stage

                        Another tent basically, less popular bands, although once again, there are always a few which many people want to see. The only time my friends and I ventured over to this part of the festival was to see Ida Maria's 'I like you so much better when you're naked!' which became a bit of an anthem to our Reading Weekend (I LIKE YOU SO MUCH BETTER WHEN YOU'RE DRUNK!) Last year this had Does It Offend You, Yeah? Ida Maria and Elliot Minor, to name a few.

                        - Radio 1 Lock-up Stage/Dance Arena

                        On Friday and Saturday this stage was referred to as Radio 1 Lock up. On the Sunday it became the Dance Arena - clearly trying to cater to more people. It's surprising how popular the Dance Arena is really, but if there is nothing better on, it's good to go and have a good jump around to some dance music.

                        There is also an Alternative Stage which features some comedy acts and other things. And another stage, whose proper name has escaped me but it is something like the 'BBC Introducing Stage' with unsigned bands playing. Usually worth a look, because you never know how good these people could be.

                        ---------------------

                        CAMPING:

                        There are many different campsites in Reading. As far as my memory serves me there are Red, Green, Yellow, Purple, Brown and White. White is known as the 'Quiet camping area' usually for families etc. Yellow and Green are supposed to be the most mad and lively at night. Last year there was an Indigo as well, but I just looked on the website, and they're getting rid of Indigo this year and just adding more space to Brown and Purple.

                        Green and Yellow are also nearest the Arena. If you camp here, you'll have pretty much everyone walking past your tent. SUGGESTION, don't pitch your tent near a pathway. You're more likely to get squashed, damaged and possibly set fire to. We were next to a pathway yesterday and we had people pee and throw up on our tent. It was disgusting. Anyway, where you camp is pretty important.

                        Close to arena = close to arena, but noisy.
                        Further away = frustrating in the morning, but quieter. It depends what you're really looking for I suppose.

                        There is also some magical thing called 'Tangerine Fields' I wish I had enough money for this! They operate in different festivals around the country, and they set up tents for you, big tents, with lights and things, and porches, and places to sit in the middle, and separate rooms for people. They give you sleeping bags, and chairs (I think) and all sorts of things. And then when you're gone, they pack it all up for you and wash it, or recycle it, or whatever, and you haven't done a thing. You don't need to take ANYTHING to the festival which isn't your own personal belongings. No tent. No sleeping bags, mats etc. Just your clothes and the other things you want. It's pretty expensive though (although I can't remember how much, I'm obviously too poor for the luxury!) But if you have enough money, it sounds pretty awesome, although I'm not sure where it's located.

                        --------------------

                        GENERAL INFORMATION:

                        The last night in the campsites is mad. It almost put me off for life. Some people become really lazy, and can't be bothered to take all their things home, so they burn their tents, sleeping bags, etc, everything that they don't want. I suppose this is fair enough, but then every now and then, you get the idiots who decide they also can't be bothered to carry home their gas canisters, and so they throw them on the fire too... And it bursts into absolutely huge flames! It's mental! I was terrified, but obviously survived!
                        According to the websites they're clamping down on this, although I don't know how easy it is to stop it happening unless you have people patrolling every part of the campsite, which would be difficult.

                        The food both inside the campsite and in the arena is ridiculously expensive. I think one day I bought a plate of Chinese chicken chow mein for about £6. Chips tend to be around £2 - £3. It's so expensive, and not really worth it, but if you know you're not going to cook for the weekend, what can you do? I saved emergency money for food, however my friends did not, as they spent all their money on alcohol, so my emergency money went on their food too, and we were extremely poor by the Sunday. The plus side is, you can collect cups and some plastic bottles and get money back for them. I think it's 10p a cup and possibly 20p a plastic bottle. Helpful if you've run out of money, but takes a lot of work, and they're very fussy about what you bring back at times.

                        The choice of alcohol onsite is limited because of the sponsors. Last year the sponsors were Tuborg and Gaymers. Apparently Carlsberg was also,
                        but I don't remember this!

                        There are two Tesco's "near" the Reading site. I say "near" because they're both actually pretty far away! Despite this, it is worth going there to get a cheaper supply of alcohol and food. Last year me and my friends pretty much survived on crisps and beer throughout the weekend - all courtesy of Tesco!

                        There are (apparently) a couple of merchandise stands in and outside of the arena. The only one which I saw was in the arena, and I purchased a Reading hoodie on the Friday, which was good because they sold out pretty soon after I got mine! There is merchandise for all the bands playing, and all the bands that are supposed to play. I say this because last year although Slipknot and Avenged Sevenfold both pulled out of Reading last minute, I am told they both still have merchandise on sale!

                        There is a 'market' in the camping area where you can buy various bits and pieces. I believe last year there was a Guitar Hero tent here as well. There are also various water points in the arena and in the campsites. These are useful in the mornings and evenings to freshen up. There are, indeed, showers but try and find them! I felt completely disgusting by the end of the weekend, covered in what was probably stale beer and all sorts of rubbish, but I had no clue where the showers were, so I had to make do with trying to clean myself a little bit with the water points in the camp site - which was rather unsuccessful. So finding, and using, the showers would be recommended.

                        In the nighttimes there is also a Silent Disco (which I never quite made it to last year, because my friends and I never managed to find it?!) and a Fun Fair! Last year both of these closed on the Sunday night, because I think they were worried about what people might do to them, seeing as everyone was burning their stuff and wrecking the toilets and things. I'm planning on trying both of these this year though, if we manage to find them! There is also a late night cinema, showing various films throughout the night until 3 or 4 am, in case you can't think of anything else to do.

                        --------------------

                        A SUMMARY:

                        2008 was my first Reading festival. I wasn't really sure what to expect, and it was a bit up and down for me, but I'm definitely going back! The live music is always amazing, as is the atmosphere in the arena. There are usually some phenomenal bands playing, and things you wouldn't want to miss. Some of the bands are new, and awesome, and there are also some good old friends there (Like Metallica!) but it's good for everybody really.

                        -------------------

                        A FEW TIPS:

                        ~ I'd say if you're easily frightened, maybe leave on the Sunday evening just as it all finishes, avoiding all the mass fires and riots and things, because it can get quite scary!

                        ~ Buy a programme! As expensive as they are, it's definitely helpful. I think they cost around £6 but I'm not entirely sure. It's very handy to be able to work out when to get out of bed and what you want to see.

                        ~ Bring toilet roll, your own hand wash (the ones they provide don't last very long and smell disgusting) and mobile phone (I lost my friends last year, and it was a nightmare)

                        ~ Bring a torch! The amount of times you might struggle to find your tent without it... It's an essential.

                        ~ Pitch your tent away from the pathways. You're less likely to be set fire to, destroyed or peed on if you're further away from where everyone walks through. However, you're more likely to make new friends if you're by the pathway. So it's a win-lose situation.

                        ~ Be prepared to lose things or for things to get ruined. I lost a torch, £20 and a t-shirt last year. Two of my friends lost lilo's. I also ruined my converse with mud on the first day and they were basically ruined.

                        ~ Wet wipes are a godsend!

                        ~ Wellies are a complete necessity. You will not survive the weekend without them if you are camping

                        --------------------

                        Well I clearly rambled a lot... I hope this was useful though.

                        All I have left to say is that tickets for Reading Festival 2009 are on sale from 7pm on Monday 30th March. I'm definitely hoping to get mine!

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                          04.03.2009 22:59
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                          the ultimate way to spend a weekend

                          Reading and Leeds are 2 sisters festivals, ran at the same time, on the August bank holiday every year. They have the same bands playing at the same/similar time, just on different days. For example, in 2008, The Killers played Leeds on Sunday, and Reading on Saturday.

                          The festivals are the last of the big festivals to be held over the summer. Glastonbury, T in the Park, V Festival, Download etc., all being held before, some as early as June, up until August.

                          The music at the festival is spread across a number of stages, from massive, world famous bands on Main Stage, down to local, unsigned, unknown bands on the BBC Introducing stage, and everything inbetween. I don't think I would say "there is something for everyone" because people who are big fans of dance, R&B etc. aren't really catered for. You do get a mix of metal, rock, indie, alternative and guitar-ry stuff.

                          TICKETS
                          For the festival, you can buy a weekend ticket, or a day ticket, so you can go to see the bands you want, even if you only wanted to see Friday's music, for less than a weekend ticket. A weekend ticket will set you back around £160 once you've paid fees and postage, and a weekend ticket is about £80-£90 (I've never bought a day ticket so I'm not fully certain). The weekend ticket allows you entry from Thursday until Sunday, including all access to the arena and campsites. A day ticket will get you into the arena for the specified day, and, if you really wanted to, you could stay in the campsite after that, because no one forces you to leave. But you might get bored through the day doing that.

                          You also have the option to buy an early entry ticket for an extra £10, with which you can get into the campsite on Wednesday, a day before the crowds, to get a good tent space. Highly recommended in my opinion.

                          CAMPSITE

                          The campsite is split into different sections identified by the colour of the bunting running between telegraph poles. There is no uniformity of tents here, i.e, people don't leave pathways etc (except the fire lanes)., its more of a case of finding a space and using it. So it is chaotic, but fun. Also, the lighting is fairly poor, so your best off camping near a memorable spot (a visible sign/flag) or having an excellent sense of direction and memory. A torch would be very handy in these situations when your returning to your tent at night time. Having said that, not many people use them. I didn't. I wish I did. On the last night, you can get massive fires as people burn their tents as everyone is too lazy to pack them up, or they're just a complete mess so they're not worth keeping. It might be an idea to pack up on Sunday, so if any loony runs over and sets your tent alight, you can get your stuff out.

                          Also, be careful, some absolute idiots will throw gas bottles onto the fires, which obviously, is risky, so to be safe, you might want to stay away from massive bonfires which people are gathering around.

                          Despite the gas problem, the festival still allows campfire and barbequeues etc. which some festivals have banned. This saves having to pay shedloads to the food vans.

                          A food van in the festival will usually sell a burger for about £5!! chips £2! drinks £2 and nine inch pizzas between £7 and £9. I wouldn't rely too much on these. They're aren't worth it in my opinion. Then, if drinking is your thing, a pint from the bar is about £3.20, with a 20p refund for returning cups. You will see a lot of people walking round picking up cups. A crate of beer from the onsite supermarket was £25 in 2008. The choice of alcohol is limited, depending on sponsers. In 2007 and earlier this was Carling, but 2008 was Carlsberg, Tuborg and Gaymers cider.

                          The line up for the festival is announced only just before tickets are released. By just before I mean like 30 seconds. This is done over BBC Radio 1, and on the Reading/Leeds website, but this will be very busy. This is one thing I don't like about the festival. Other festivals usual announce several acts weeks or months before the ticket release. But not here. Also tickets will sell out very quick. There's a lot of panic and servers get extremely slow. See Tickets and Ticketmaster are probably the best places for tickets. Usually HMV sell some tickets the next day, but not very many. You'd need to queue up early. Only the bigger stores sell them, and usually, HMVs south of Leeds sell Reading tickets, and Leeds and further north sell Leeds tickets, at face value, no fees to pay.

                          <b>This year, 2009, tickets go on sale on the 30th March at 7pm.</b>
                          Rumours this year, so far, to name a few, include Kings of Leon, Radiohead, Arctic Monkeys and AC/DC.

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                            02.11.2008 18:18
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                            Gimme Gimme More!!

                            This is the best music experience ive ever had!!
                            I went for my first time this year, and it was just, amazing!! I have already bought my tickets for next year(£165) & i cannot WAIT!!! :D
                            Even though bands not have been announced yet, you know that you are in for a treat by going! I dont think ive ever seen a poster for reading festival which did not have great bands all weekend long!
                            If you enjoy music then you definetly have to go to Reading Festival!!
                            This year, i must say that me & my friends stayed in the Tangerine Fields(already set up, quieter campsite with showers & nicer toilets), but actually we spent most of our time in the normal camping areas with some other friends & it was such a good time! Everybody is very friendly and at times you can end up making some friends for the weekend (Y)!
                            Best bands this year were probably :Tenacious D , Does It Offend You Yeah?, Bullet For My Valentine, Metallica ..and just many many more!!
                            I dont know why anyone would not want to go!! If you're worried because noone showers.. it REALLY doesnt matter! noone is else going to. :P & You will REGRET it soo much by not going!!!!!

                            Bring on Reading 09!!!!!!!!!

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