Welcome! Log in or Register
£1.78 Best Offer by: thedrinkshop.com See more offers
16 Reviews
  • Sickly in large doses
  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    16 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      15.04.2013 10:30
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A taste of wild Africa in a delectable, exotic cream.

      Like most South Africans, I am a fan of Amarula Cream albeit in small doses or mixed with other choice beverages. Of course this is a firm favourite in the land of my birth, especially with the ladies, and I was pleasantly surprised to see it stocked at the local Sainsburys.

      Amarula is actually a fruit often found growing wild in Southern Africa and is quite well known as being a favourite with many a wild animal. These animals tend to eat the fruit that has fallen off the tree and has fermented slightly, resulting in what some consider to be a comedic appearance of drunkenness. The fruit itself is well known for providing lots of Vitamin C but don't expect to get your daily Vitamin C from drinking this!!

      The bottle itself is a dark, almost chocolate brown in colour with a yellow tassel wrapped around the neck. The label shows a picture of an elephant with the word Amarula writ large above it. The bottle does also flare every so slightly towards the top and bottom, purely for aesthetic appeal I'm sure, although I like to think it helps to prevent the bottle slipping from your hand!

      In my opinion the taste is great, with a slightly exotic touch at first and a smooth finish which should appeal to most cream fans. Of course the exotic taste might put some people off and the creamy consistency can become a bit much. This is generally drunk with ice to thin it out or as a mixer (normally with Peppermint liqueur to make Springbok shooters).

      A 700ml bottle will set you back in the region of about £13 or so but you may be able to get it cheaper by shopping around. Apparently you can also get a larger bottle but I haven't yet come across it. So far I've only seen it in the larger supermarkets, but then I'm not one who frequents the smaller off licenses and such.

      Amarula is imported into the UK by Distell Ltd, who are famous back home for making a wide range of spirits! At 17% alcohol content, this is by no means a strong drink but it is on par with other creams on the market.

      Also published on Ciao under the same name.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      24.03.2013 15:25
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      For sharing with friends or relaxing in front of the TV.

      Amarula is a tasty treat that combines cream, sugar, and the fruit of the African Marula Tree into a drink sensation that has to be tasted to be believed. It currently edges out Bailey's as Vicky's Cream Liqueur of choice and even holds the unique privilege of being one of my personal favourite Ice Cream toppings.

      Amarula is available in most supermarkets in a large brown bottle with an eye catching yellow label depicting an Elephant walking through a field of Maurula Fruits. As an added perk the bottle also includes a golden string around the neck that ensures Amarula will look good whenever you present it as a gift to someone.

      Amarula has a slightly thinner pour to Baileys, but nevertheless retains a similarly pleasant milky coffee colour. The nose features a strong creamy whiskey vibe, with just a hint of its fruitiness to tease the back of the nostrils.

      The true magic begins when you taste the drink. Amarula combines a strong creamy flavour with whiskey and a definite hint of Yorkshire Fudge. It does have a slight aftertaste of the Marula fruit, but to be honest this is quickly overpowered by the cream.

      Amarula is a drink that can be useful on many occasions and for many people. It is really effective served straight up in a shot glass and sipped slowly, but then it can also be nice in a larger glass drizzled over ice. I have also discovered that the rich creamy flavour is ideal for drizzling gently over Vanilla Ice-cream, and does wonderful things to coffee.

      Amarula currently retails at most supermarkets for around £14 and it's a drink that can be made to last. Whether you want to impress your guests or just relax in front of the TV with the wife Amarula will fit the occasion. The drink has a 17% alcohol volume that enables it to warm the insides without being overpowering, so it is definitely worthwhile. I would recommend it for all; unless you dislike the taste of cream of course!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        26.02.2013 03:38
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A beautiful drink, and it lovely any time of the year, thou its my guilty pleasure at Christmas

        =Amarula=
        My guilty pleasure at Christmas, while I deserve a treat after wrapping all the Christmas presents.

        =How I came across Armula=
        About 15 years ago wondering around duty free shop in Tunisia, I spotted this bottle on the shelf, I was instantly curious, as I had never seen the brand before, and the picture had an elephant on the front, and also it was on offer. As I love Baileys, I thought I can Baileys anywhere, and thought I'd take a chance.

        =The Bottle=
        The bottle is a brown glass bottle, gold screw top, a gold tassel around the neck of the bottle, and a picture of an elephant on the label. With the description that it was a liqueur, with a 17% volume of alcohol and was made from a fruit called the Matula fruit with is native to Africa, and then matured for two years and then is blended with cream.

        =The Drink=
        The first thing that you notice is the smell, it is a sweet smell but not over powering, you get a aroma of fruit, the nearest to describe the smell to would be a cross between a apricot and a peach. It's a creamy liquor, similar to a Baileys but a thinner consistency. It's lovely served over ice, and when you drink it just goes so smoothly and you feel a warm taste. The drink has an element of sweetness, and it's not one that you would drink to get drunk on.

        =Ice-cream=
        This is as gorgeous when poured over vanilla ice-cream, it enhances the taste of the ice-cream.

        =Availability=
        I'm pleased to say that you now buy this from Tesco, - it is around £15 a bottle, for 70cl. But it is defiantly worth it, and once you've drunk this your love it. I can't recommend it highly enough

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        03.02.2013 22:28
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        2 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A lovely rich and warming creamy treat - Definitely worth a try!

        Amarula

        Christmas just gone I once again had a very large glass of Amarula thrust into my hand. This is my partner's mothers favourite Christmas drink and she always buys a new bottle in every year.

        The Bottle

        Amarula comes in a quite unique bottle. This is a thick and solid glass that is a nice velvety chocolate brown colour. The bottle has a slight bulge design at the base and the top where the thin neck starts. On the top of the neck is a screw on cap that is a beige/gold colour. The label of this bottle is again a beige colour to match the cap and there is a big elephant sketch underneath the Amarula branding and the caption 'The Spirit of Africa'.

        Amarula comes in a 70 Cl bottle and the liquor is 17 % ABV, this should be stored in the fridge or at a cool temperature 5°C 25°C.

        The Drink

        This beverage is a cream based drink whose main/unique ingredient is the Marlula fruit which is only found in the sub-Saharan plains of Africa. Apparently elephants go wild for this fruit, hence the elephant campaign. The fruit is very rich in vitamins including vitamin C, potassium, calcium and magnesium, as well as protein, which makes it a few portions of your five a day*.
        (* this may not be strictly true!!!)

        The fruit only grows for a few months of the year, after this it is picked and then fermented, distilled and matured for two years in Oak before being blended with the finest fresh dairy cream to create the Amarula drink.

        To Serve & Taste

        This drink can be drunk on its own or in coffees and cocktails. Personally I have only had it as a stand-alone drink, but it is definitely something that I would like to try in a cocktail! It is best enjoyed chilled over ice.

        The liquid is a rich, smooth and creamy consistency that is a light beige colour. The drink is quite thick, as you would expect of a cream based liquor. The taste of this is quite surprising and distinctive, my initial perception of this was that it was going to taste like Baileys which I enjoy every now and then, but this is a lot more fruity.

        The first flavour that you get from this is a sweet and creamy essence, it is very rich and smooth and quite refreshing with a cube of ice. The fruitiness comes through immediately after which makes the taste of this very sweet and after one glass I find a bit sickly if I'm honest. The drink also has a faint earthy and wooden flavour which I suppose comes from the Oak barrels it is matured in. For a 17 % ABV I also think it tastes quite robust and you get a hit of strong alcohol with each mouthful that warms you up.

        Overall

        I like this drink as a single helping at the dinner table post meal rather than something I would drink on a night out. It is lovely and rich and warming, with a silky smooth texture. For me, one large measure of this is enough, if you like creamy based drink this is a nice alternative with a fruity twist. A 70 cl bottle of this currently costs around £13 which is a good price for a decent creamy treat!

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          03.01.2012 13:40
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          13 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          A fantastic tipple that quite easily knocks spots off Baileys!

          AmarulA

          Amurula is a cream based fruit liqueur that comes from South Africa. It is in my humble opinion far nicer than Bailey's cream.

          Apparently according to the bottle elephants travel for miles to feast on the delicious tasting AmarulA fruit that grows on the amarul tree ( Latin name: Sclerocarya birrea). These delicious fruits are eaten by the elephants and locally they are called the elephant tree as they attract the elephants because of the lovely tasting fruits. The problem with these fruits is that they tend to ferment in the elephants stomachs making them a bit tipsy so after noshing on the fruit it is not a rare sight to see the elephants off their heads swaying like any drunk in any high street. It is claimed to take 2nd place to that of Baileys but I believe once you have tried this you will knock Baileys into oblivion.

          The Bottle!

          The bottle is a dark brown bottle with a golden crown and a piece of knotted string tied around the neck for decoration. The label has a picture of a bull elephant with the words AmarulA at the top and Marula fruit and cream at the bottom with a picture of the fruit underneath. The bottle contains 700 mls and is only 17% alcohol. According to the label on the back it is aged for two years in French Oak casks before being blended into the cream and should be stored at a temperature between 5C and 25C.

          The taste.

          Similar creamy taste to that of baileys and other cream based drinks but this is certainly sweeter and is really tasty leaving you wanting more! You can taste the fruitiness of the drink mixed in with the alcohol. I am unable to tell you what the fruit tastes like because it is nothing like I have tasted before but in my opinion it is a little like a cross between a longhan fruit and mildly a lychee.

          Would I recommend it?

          Yes it is a beautiful tasting product and highly addictive. It was a firm favourite in our house over the Christmas period so much so I was dispatched to buy three more bottles which seemed to keep everyone placated.

          So how much is this delectable and moreish little number?
          It is sold in most supermarkets for around £10:49 for a 700mls bottle. It can also be purchased from the duty free shops at a litre a bottle for roughly the same price!

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments
          • More +
            17.07.2011 22:51
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            1 Comment

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Africa meets Ireland and the result is Amarula

            Amarula is a cream based fruit liqueur from South Africa which is made from the fruit of the marula tree. It may appeal to those who like drinks like Baileys Irish Cream because it's a creamy drink with a warming kick of alcohol, or those who like fruit liqueurs.

            The marula tree grows only in sub-equatorial areas of Africa and, despite attempts by farmers to cultivate it, it only grows wild; interestingly, the male tree bears the flowers, while the female tree bears the fruit. The marula is an integral part of the culture of the Zulus who regard it as a symbol of fertility and refer to it as the "marriage tree". Whether there's any scientific evidence to recommend this I couldn't say but I know it's a very pleasant drink to sip over ice; maybe if you drink enough of it you'll be in the mood for lurve.

            For thousands of years the fruit of the marula tree have been eaten in Africa, and not just by elephants who will charge at the tree to knock off the berries so they can eat them (and who's going to argue if an elephant is heading towards their local marula tree). The oil from the marula tree is reputedly rich in antioxidants and oleic acid and the flesh of the fruit is high in vitamin C so it's not all bad news, however when you factor in the cream that goes into the production of Amarula you're now looking at 158 Calories, 6.1grams of fat and 15.3 grams of sugar for one 1.5oz glass serving. The alcohol content is 17 per cent.

            We all deserve a treat now and then, though, so what exactly does it taste like? Well, the fruit flavour is not actually as dominant as you might think; I tend to think of it more as being scented with the marula rather than flavoured. There's a slight floral flavour and aroma but actually there's a smell and taste of toffee that's actually more pronounced than the fruit.

            The texture is as smooth and silky as you'd hope for and consistency-wise you'd hardly know it from Baileys or one of the higher quality Irish cream liqueurs (I stress higher quality as cheap versions can often be very thin and runny).

            The cream is not too overpowering but it does have an underlying taste of butter and, personally, I find one small measure of Amarula over ice quite sufficient and I might drink this at the end of the evening or at the end of a meal, like I would with a Baileys. What I would probably prefer is a just a fruit liqueur flavoured with marula fruit: indeed, this is exactly how Amarula was originally when it came onto the market back in 1983. I was only a kid then so I've never tasted that. The cream based version was launched in 1989 and was so much more popular than the original that they stopped manufacturing that and now only make the cream variety. I have added a dash of Amarula to a black coffee as if making an Irish cream coffee but with the floral flavour it doesn't work at all. On the other hand, a little drizzled over vanilla ice cream is quite divine.

            The packaging deserves a brief mention because it does convey an idea that this is quite a traditional product with some heritage behind it, rather than simply being a shade over thirty years old. The bottle is an unusual shape and the nicely illustrated label shows a charging elephant, heading straight for his next fix of marula berries I presume. A gold braid ties around the bottle hints again at tradition and luxury though it's a teeny bit kitsch, if you ask me.

            Once opened you should keep your bottle of Amarula in refrigerated or at least in a cool place. It's good for two years once opened which may seem like forever but actually it takes me forever to get through a bottle and for this reason I tend to buy the 700ml bottle rather than the 1 litre.

            In the UK Amarula can be bought in most large supermarkets and speciality off licence stores. In July 2011 Tesco and Sainsburys are selling a 70cl bottle for £12.49 while ASDA (Walmart in disguise) are managing to sell it for a mind bogglingly cheap £8.00 (but do remember that Walmart in the States tend to fire workers when they unionise).

            This would make a good gift for someone who likes cream based liqueurs; it's a little bit different from the norm and looks like a really special drink because of the presentation. Not for those watching their weight but lovely for an occasional treat.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              29.05.2010 14:17
              Very helpful
              (Rating)

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              A nice occasional thing

              Amarula

              I've been drinking Amarula for over ten years and I'm very fond of it.

              The Packaging

              Amarula comes in a brown, glass bottle with a gold screw top lid, gold coloured labels and a yellow string tied around the neck. All the information is clear and easy to read. The main label contains a picture of an elephant and a couple of the fruits of the amarula tree. Sometimes you can buy it in a cardboard tube, which is good if giving for a gift. The bottle contains 70cl, or the same as a standard wine bottle.

              The Cost and Availability

              It generally costs between £12 to £15, depending on where you shop. It used to be limited availability but now I think most big stores stock it.

              The Product

              The Amarula itself is a gorgeous creamy drink, the same consistency as Baileys, it is flavoured, very subtly, with the fruit from the amarula tree, a much nicer taste than Bailey's in my opinion. It is much better chilled than room temperature, although it doesn't have to be kept chilled. It can get very sickly if drinking throughout the evening, I tend to have just one or two drinks of it. I don't buy or drink it all the time but it's nice every now and again.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              26.01.2010 16:14
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              3 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              I really like it -I'm digging out a canoe so I can travel up-river to buy some more...

              My (wild?) review of Amarula
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              There's no getting round it; I got quite a lot of booze given to me over Christmas, which is slightly odd as I probably only get through 2 or 3 alcoholic drinks on a good week! Gone are my mad days of University gigs in the 90's where the beer would be stacked up to the ceiling in a bubbly tower of crates in our dressing room...

              ...(and then mysteriously disappear slowly one crate at a time, as the more enterprising students risked a quick sortie into the band dressing room while we were out doing various sound checks -lol! Not that I minded; there was enough alcohol there to give King Kong a hang over).

              But nowadays I prefer to finish my social nights in the same condition I start them; upright and without any slurring :-)

              Among my clinking glass collection of donations from Santa was a rather nice bottle that caught my eye, and hence got opened quickly... Nice because... well because... OK I liked it because it had a picture of an elephant and I happen to like elephants -lol (despite strangely never owning one; just no room in the garage with my folding bike!).


              What is this Amarula tribe, Tarzan?
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              Despite all the mysterious references on the bottle to elephants (which I'm pretty confident it doesn't contain any of -lol!) and exotic African fruit, Amarula is a cream liqueur - very much following in the footsteps of Baileys and other Irish Creams.

              Even the bottle is very similar to a generic/supermarket home brand Irish Cream bottle - with its smoky brown glass and gold screw cap, though somehow the addition of the elephant picture and a bit of thin gold rope knotted around the neck of the bottle under the cap - combine to make Amarula more eye catching somehow.


              Something new; or same old witch doctors brew?
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              As I mentioned - as far as I'm concerned Amarula is basically an Irish Cream variant... but it does differ slightly in the addition of a fruity flavour. The fruit is supplied by the wild marula fruit (ok I have no idea what that is either; but I'm sure I saw an episode where Tarzan averted a tribe wide fever by bravely going off to fetch a similar plant for the jungle doctor to administer -so it's probably something like that -lol!).

              As Adam an Eve may have once said - during their run in with the big fellow; 'Does a bit fruit really matter?' ... and in this case (I mean the Amarula not Adam-and-eve -lol!) make a difference... Well yes, it sure does...

              As soon as you unscrew the cap (a disappointing way to open the bottle - I was hoping the top needed to be levered off with coconut husks or dried giraffe droppings or something; in keeping with the mood) the aroma of fruitiness hits you.

              Not an unpleasant citrus fruit smell -which would turn my stomach in the presence of all that cream (yuck! I love oranges, grapefruit etc but that kind of smell mixed with cream would be nasty!) -but a rich, dark fruit... perhaps distantly akin to the darker berries you might taste in a yogurt.

              The marula fruit (marula; it'll probably turn out to be African for cherry or blackberry won't it? You know; like they rename everyday food in restaurants so it sounds more exotic -and er...costs more :-) mixes well with the thick aroma of cream and the sharper fragrance of 17% vol alcohol that hits your nostrils harder than a distracted, dentist (hey it's the only analogy I could think of so cut me some slack please; you can use the rope tied round the Amarula bottle to do it if you like -lol!)


              Good Taste?
              ~~~~~~~~
              (Or has Jane put purple spider wallpaper in Tarzan's tree house again?)
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              Poured into a glass with a little ice (I recommend cubes from the fridge rather than collecting it from outside during very cold weather!!) and then left to settle in a warm room for a while so that some of the ice melts in with the Amarula -I put my glass on the shelf above the gas fire for about 5 minutes before drinking it (if all you're ice melts immediately you should probably dial for help as your house may be on fire :-) ...then the taste is really quite spectacular (if you like the Irish Cream type drinks).

              The fruity taste is quite evident as you sip Amarula, but so too is the predictably warm rich creamy taste that you'd expect from this type of liqueur. It is at heart simply Baileys (or similar Irish cream) with a bit of a fruity kick thrown in for good measure; and very good it is too.


              Worth going on Safari for; or just a big Cheetah?
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              Although I think Amarula is not quite as original as it thinks it is... being just an Irish Cream variant with a bit of fruit thrown in... I can't dispute that it is a fine blend of ingredients and that the end result, for folks like me who enjoy Irish cream; is one of pleasant surprise!

              I don't think I could be tempted away from the usual Baileys variants to drink Amarula exclusively -but it is a welcome slight change from the norm and I will certainly be buying the drink at some point when my current bottle is empty (I think there's a an old legend whereby when the bottle is nearing empty it must return by long and perilous trek to the jungle from whence it was created, and then seek out the secret Amarula graveyard... You know; I really must stop watching those old Johnny Weissmuller films :-)

              Last time I saw a bottle of Amarula on sale it was hovering (not literally!) at just under £10 for a 700ml bottle which in my book (my Jungle Book -sorry couldn't resist it -I am in jovial mood today aren't I? It's not the alcohol I assure you :-) puts it in the category of -not too expensive a treat, but not one I'd buy every few weeks -maybe once every 3 or 4 months possibly? But the point is; buy it I would -I really liked the drink...

              The only negative I can think off regarding Amarula would perhaps be for someone who doesn't like Irish Cream in general and so naturally they wouldn't like Amarula by default.

              I bet even our black and white, Olympic winning, Tarzan AKA Johnny Weissmuller would have enjoyed a little tipple of Amarula in ye olde tree house -that is of course on nights he wasn't going down his local jungle pub; The Vine!!

              Thanks so much for taking the time to read my review, hope you enjoyed it, found some useful information and forgave my terrible humour!!

              Best wishes,
              Caveat-Emptor

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                07.08.2009 22:08

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                Amazing drink especially for us ladies

                I was so excited when i found it in tesco .Im not much of a drinker but amarula appeals to me on so many levels . Firstly its price is about ten pound for the large bottle which makes it very affordable. the packaging is exotic looking .Hence even though its cheap it has a classy feel to it. The taste is creamy and chocolatey . Unlike baileys it doesnt have the strong alcohol kick to it even though its alcohol percentage is 17%.It also takes longer to start tasting sicken.It is amazing to use to make cocktails with especially when you mix it with mint ice cream .This is the type drink you wouldnt be embarrassed to take to a party because the packaging also gets positive remarks and so does the taste. In short its classsy, great tasting ,cheap , great for cocktails and gets you drunk . what more would you ask for in alcohol .

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                08.05.2009 17:29
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                4 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                I think I shall drink this more often!

                It's not often I drink but at my daughter's house the other day she showed me an unusual bottle of liqueur called Amarula, I loved the picture of the elephant on the label and the unusual golden tassel around the neck of the bottle. When she offered me a glass and told me it was a fruity liqueur I decided to take her up on it as it sounded like a nice change from the usual chocolate and coffee flavours most liqueurs tend to focus on.

                Amarula is a South African liqueur made from the marula fruit which is distilled and then matured for two years before being blended with cream to create the finished drink. Amarula has an ABV of 17%, which is equal to most other cream liqueurs available.

                It looks like the cheaper brands of Irish Cream, it has a thinner consistency than Baileys and although is the same rich beige colour it was a very subtle hint of pink which is really no more than a shade but it makes all the difference to the appearance. My daughter poured mine over ice and I must say it looks delicious and very luxurious.

                The smell is quite unusual, it's distinctly fruity but this is a subtle aroma underneath the general creamy smell of the Amarula. I was surprised at how fruity it smelled actually and also that I could detect a blend of fruity flavours, I hadn't really had any idea what the marula fruit smelled like but I can confirm it's a tropical scent with perhaps a little berry aroma thrown in for good measure.

                I love the taste of Amarula, it has a deliciously creamy consistency and although it's thinner than Baileys it has a much creamier texture. It tastes wonderfully luxurious and I was surprised when I asked my daughter the price to find she'd paid just £11 for the 700ml bottle in Tesco!

                The taste is like no other liqueur I've ever drunk before. It has a creamy flavour, I can perhaps detect just a smidgen of coffee flavouring but the main thing is a lovely blend of fruitiness which comes through. There is a small alcoholic kick after each sip which is similar to the vague burn you get after drinking a glass of Baileys, this is a very pleasant sensation and although it's not a drink that will get you tipsy after just one glass I did find the overall flavour and creaminess helped make it a relaxing mellow beverage.

                As I said, I drank mine over ice but I've just been browsing the Amarula website (www.amarula.co.za) and stumbled across a cocktail recipe that I believe would suit the sweet, fruity flavour of the drink perfectly. It's called an Amarula Sunset and you need 30ml of Amarula, 1/2 cup of good quality vanilla ice cream and 2 - 3 teaspoons of pureed strawberries. You blend the ingredients together and serve in a martini glass.

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  26.10.2008 02:15
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  2 Comments

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  A little taste of Africa

                  Amarula is a creamy liqueur all the way from sunny South Africa, and here in the UK, unfairly has to compete with a variety of other cream liqueurs such as Bailey's. Amarula is made with sugar, cream and the fruit of the Maroela tree.

                  Amarula has become the second largest seller in the cream liqueur category.

                  It is bottled in a nicley shaped brown glass bottle, and the label is a drawing of an elephant. The maroela tree is called the Elephant Tree, mostly because elephants absolutely love the fruit of this tree, and apparently has been known to get a little "tipsy" of eating too many fermented fruit falling on the ground in the hot summer months.

                  A typical South African shooter made with this liqueur, is called a "springbokkie" after the national rugby team, and consists of a layer of creme de menthe in the bottom of a shooter glass, topped with a layer of Amarula....delicious!

                  Otherwise the drink is great over crushed ice, or even poured over ice cream. It has a fruity caramel flavour, but unlike any of the other cream liqueuers. ....Mmmmmm!

                  Just dont stagger around like a drunken elephant!

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    12.07.2006 13:25
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)
                    7 Comments

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    A unique, delicious, versatile liqueur made from the fruit of the mysterious 'elephant tree'.

                    THE ESSENCE

                    Amarula Cream is flavoured by the fruit of the mysterious marula tree found only in sub-equatorial Africa. Many legends surround the marula tree, Sclerocarrya birrea, - they cannot be cultivated by man, so the fruit is harvested in the wild; many tribes perform traditional marriage ceremonies and fertility rites beneath its mysterious branches; the bark is eaten by expectant Venda mothers to determine the gender of their unborn child; the Zulus believe someone suffering from measles will be cured if the walk silently to a marula tree and bite its bark at the break of dawn.

                    When ripe the fruit takes on the colour of the African sun under which it matures. When I lived in South Africa, I used to love finding freshly fallen fruit at the end of summer. They are small and ovoid with soft, smooth skins. The edible part is the flesh around the nut, which can also be ground down and the oil used for skincare, ritual and medicinal purposes. The pale flesh is juicy, sweet and deliciously tart, with a light, flowery scented flavour, and it is this character which makes Amarula Cream unique.

                    Many animals of the African bush also enjoy the marula fruit, the most famous consumers being elephants, who charge the trees to dislodge the fruit, and munch on those already fallen which are fermenting on the ground. The herds that frequently gather around the trees, have lent their name to the “elephant tree”, and become synonymous with the liqueur.

                    Amarula Cream is made by pulping the flesh of the fruit, which is then fermented until a clear marula wine is formed. The fruit solids are compressed and distilled and added to the wine to enhance the flavour of the fruit. The spirit is then matured for two years in French oak barrels, before being blended with fresh cream, producing a delectable product with a 17%vol alcohol content. Amarula Cream lasts for two years once bottled, and should be stored in the refrigerator or a cool place once opened.


                    THE TASTING

                    Amarula Cream is housed in a heavy golden glass bottle, embossed with an elephant walking through the bush. The front label continues the elephant theme with pictures of a bull on the search for some marula, and the golden fruits themselves. The bold gold title announces the liqueur as Amarula Marula Fruit Cream, a product of South Africa. The posterior label tells a short tale of the marula tree. The bottle is easily recognised by the tassled golden rope which hangs around its neck, adding an appearance of class.

                    Pouring the Amarula into a small glass I immediately notice how smooth it is, resembling the velvet quality of melted chocolate, but at a far thinner and more versatile consistency. The colour is pale fawn with a hint of almond, and it becomes obvious that the bottle has been designed to greatly compliment the colour of the liqueur.

                    The bouquet is sweet and floral, tinged with a strong promise of alcohol, and an overtone of toffee. Imbibing the liquid I experience an strong initial taste sensation of sweet cream, which is buttery but not too rich. This is followed by a very subtle hint of the marula fruit, along with a myriad of other flavours including caramel, toffee and mild vanilla, with slight undertones of coffee. As the liquid reaches the back of my mouth the bite of the alcohol sets in, with a wonderful warming sensation, perfectly offset by the cooling of the cream.

                    The texture is overwhelmingly smooth, and on swallowing there is none of the residual mouth coating associated with many cream liqueurs, just a crisp lingering aftertaste of tropical flower scented cream.

                    This liqueur excels in taking the consumer on a roller-coaster ride of full-bodied flavours, from the curious and exotic marula to the well-loved cream. Amarula is often compared to Bailey’s, for appearance and consistency, and while I enjoy Bailey’s, I find Amarula far less rich, less cloying and far more unusual. However, I believe it would be improved by increasing the flavour of the marula fruit. It is certainly present but is overpowered by this mysterious toffee overtone, and until I had experienced the fresh fruit from the tree I found the marula essence quite hard to discern within all those different flavours. Still, the drink is very well balanced, pleasant, and the distinctive flavours highly unique. It is particularly versatile in being rich and sophisticated enough for after dinner, or light enough to be enjoyed on a summer afternoon.


                    BEING INVENTIVE WITH AMARULA

                    The customary way to take Amarula is on the rocks, although I prefer mine unadulterated and at room temperature, as I find the ice does not mix well with the Cream, making the texture watery, and dumbing down the flavours.

                    A visually striking and gustatory delicious use of Amarula is in a Springbok. This stylish short is created with a layer of Amarula sat atop a green tier of Crème de menthe, and should be gulped whole to maximise the taste experience.

                    Amarula also performs very well in coffee, or latte, bringing a gentle warming sweetness to the beverage.

                    Dom Pedros are popular after dinner treats in South Africa, and are halfway between a pudding and a drink. They can be made with any liqueur, but I find Amarula the most delicious. To make a Dom Pedro whizz vanilla ice-cream, Amarula, and double cream in a blender, then serve immediately.

                    There are a wealth of innovative food recipes (e.g. Bittersweet Amarula Drumsticks) and sophisticated cocktail ideas at www.amarula.co.za, which I definitely intend to try out. An example is the tasty sounding ‘Tusk At Dusk’: 1 shot Amarula, 1/2 shot rum, 1/2 shot Grande Marnier, 1 shot chilled espresso.

                    As the people at Amarula say - “Amarula is a rare find, enjoy it accordingly.”


                    OTHER INFORMATION

                    Amarula cream is made by the Distell Group, and was first marketed in 1989. Apart form the delicious taste, another good reason to enjoy Amarula is that it is produced by a company, who do a lot for sustainable economic development, local communities and conservation in South Africa. 60,000 local people benefit from selling the fruit they gather to the processing plant, and the company has been involved in creating employment opportunities for them outwith the harvesting season. They have also provided rural communities with community halls, health clinics and crèches, and fund the Amarula Elephant Research Programme at the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, along with projects with the Kenya Wildlife Service.

                    A typical 1.5 fluid ounce serving of Amarula Cream contains 158 calories, 6.16 grams of fat, and 15.3 grams of sugar.

                    Amarula Cream won a Silver Medal (Best in Class) at the 2005 International Wine and Spirit Competition.

                    For more information see www.amarula.co.za.

                    70cL costs £8.98 at Tesco.com, 1L bottles also available.

                    © 2005 (2006) V.L.Collyer

                    (Despite what it says below (my 'yes' will not be excepted), this is highly recommended!)

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      20.03.2002 16:07
                      Very helpful
                      (Rating)
                      7 Comments

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      How fitting it was that I had my first experience of the treasures of Amarula in Africa, a continent that I visit very frequently. Amarula is an extremely unique drink because it uses the fruit from the Marula Tree, which is only found in the heart of Africa (Sub Equatorial Africa to be precise). The fruit from the Marula Tree, once ripened is a bright yellow in colour and the flesh is white. The ripe fruit is gathered and the flesh is removed from the skin. It is fermented and distilled in copper pots and then matured in oak casks for around two years. All this time it is continuously enriched with small amounts of Marula extract. This concoction is then blended with fresh cream until Amarula Cream is formed. The creaming process is of a very high standard and this is the reason for the rich texture of the liqueur. Fruit and Cream – No wonder it tastes so good. As mentioned earlier I had my first taste of Amarula whilst in Ghana, Africa. At present the company producing Amarula is engaged in heavy promotion of the product in Africa. Many giant billboards are scattered around Ghana’s capital city Accra and all boasting the slogan “Discover the Heart of Africa”. This is what promoted me to pick up a bottle from a local supermarket and share it with a few of my business colleagues. To say that this is an awesome drink is more of an understatement. It is so difficult to explain the exquisite taste in words. It certainly needs to be tasted to really appreciate the true pleasure of this amazing drink. The fruit used is from the Marula Tree (as mentioned earlier in this opinion) and this is only found in Africa. The fruit is very much liked by the indigenous population and they eat it plain or make jam and even beer out of it. The hard nut in the middle of the fruit is also rich in oil and therefore is always in demand. The fruit is also rich in Vitamin C. You may liken this t
                      o a plum or tart like fruit. Amarula Cream has been produced since September 1989 and is part of the Distell Group of companies (which is a merger between Distillers Corporation and Stellenbosch Farmers Winery. It is a South African company and as with their wines this one appears to be a major seller. Amarula Cream is a thoroughly enjoyable drink and one totally different from any other. It is highly unlikely that you will ever get to taste this wonderfully unique fruit unless you taste Amarula. The only problem is that it fills you up pretty quick and I was bloating after three glasses. The way I like it, aswell as all other liqueurs, is over plenty of ice. Either ice cubes or crushed ice. However the crushed ice tends to melt quickly and therefore the drinks tends to get quite watery if left for a little while. It just has to be had very cold. This is how you will enjoy the drink. Again this is not a drink with a long life once the bottle has been opened. You would probably keep it for 2 weeks tops in the fridge, once it has been opened. However it is recommended that you try and consume it once opened and if you have a couple of friends around, I don’t think that will be too difficult, especially after they’ve had the first sip. It comes in a very attractive bottle, which is a stained brown colour. The bottle has a brown rope tied just below the neck and this gives it a very Africanish look. The label on the neck is of a brilliant gold as is the wording “Amarula” on the main label. Alcoholic content is a moderate 17% by volume but please do not let this fool you. Believe you me after a couple of glasses you sure can feel the buzz. I think it’s the combination of cream and alcohol that produces this effect. Depending on where you buy it this goes for around £ 11.99 a bottle. I find this very reasonable for such a high quality and unique drink. Drink cr
                      itics have put this down as a very serious contender to Bailey’s and after experiencing this drink first hand, I now can see the reckoning behind this. I must reiterate that to really understand the true potential of this drink you must have yourself a taste. Believe me, you will not be disappointed.

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments
                      • More +
                        21.07.2001 03:47
                        Very helpful
                        (Rating)
                        2 Comments

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        ? AMARULA CREAM is a smooth experience- a pure and precious blend of nature?s fresh cream and the mysterious taste of the wild marula fruit?. That?s what the empty bottle on my shelf says and I couldn?t put it better myself. I first drank Amarula whilst on an expedition in Malawi. It was the end of the trip and myself and friends found it at the bar, at our camp, in a Nature Reserve. From its discovery we became hooked. Unlike the UK where it?s one of the pricier drinks about, Amarula was cheap- about 70pence a drink on ice. We spent our time relaxing under the African sun at the edge of the River Shire that flows from Lake Malawi into the Zambezi, sipping this magical drink and watching the hippos and elephants bathe. Amarula is heavenly. It?s very similar to Baileys but much richer and creamier. Its only 17% so you can enjoy lots without feeling the ill effects. I would strongly recommend it on ice. We tried it on ice cream, which is truly delicious, with coffee, with milk and even on cereal. Its flavour manages to percolate through whatever it?s with making a boring drink into a beautiful cocktail. Even the bottle it comes in is spectacular. Although it is expensive I drink it as a treat, to celebrate something special like a birthday or end of exams. Its priced about 12/13 pounds for a 700ml bottle in Britain but its much cheaper in its origin, South Africa. It actually works out about the same price as Baileys but unlike Baileys, it is often hard to find. I would recommend this to anyone with a sweet tooth especially those who like Baileys, cream or exotic drinks. Once you taste it you will find it hard to enjoy Baileys as much, so be warned. Definitely worth a try. Its becoming increasing popular and I would imagine bars will soon start to sell the drink. Enjoy.

                        Comments

                        Login or register to add comments
                        • More +
                          06.06.2001 04:07
                          Very helpful
                          (Rating)
                          14 Comments

                          Advantages

                          Disadvantages

                          There is a half empty liqueur bottle sitting in my drinks cabinet. Well, that’s a lie, it’s actually sitting right beside me now, and it has gone from being ‘quite empty’ to ‘almost completely empty’ whilst I have been doing a bit of research. The contents of the bottle is Amarula and to be fair I have had it for about eight months as I have been saving it and drinking only a little at a time. I have struggled trying not to drink it all and I could easily drink a bottle in a much shorter time!!! So, a bit of factual information and history for you. Amarula is a blend of “natures fresh cream and the mysterious taste of the wild marula fruit”. The marula tree, or sclerocarya birrea, can be found in South Africa and is also known as the Elephant Tree, hence the picture of the elephant on the label of the bottle. The tree itself is usually between 10 and 15 metres tall and produces as much as two tons of fruit. Elephants walk for miles and miles to feed on the ripe marula, hence the nickname for the tree. Tribes in Africa consider the tree to be an aphrodisiac, hence it has also be known as “The Marriage Tree” and has also been used for medicinal purposes amongst other things. The fruit is used to quench childrens thirst and by adults to make home-brewed drinks as well as jams, jellies and other dishes. The liqueur is produced and bottled in South Africa and is available in supermarkets such as Tesco and Asda for around the same price as a bottle of Baileys or Dooleys***. There is one size bottle, 700ml and it is made using the marula flesh, rather than the skin or kernel of the fruit, which is then fermented as you would ferment wine. It is then distilled in copper pot-stills and matured in casks of oak for approximately two years. Finally it is blended with cream to make a distinctive alcoholic drink. ***Extra info bit:- Both Asda (St. Austell) and Tesco (Newton Abbot) charge £1
                          0.99 for this product, and Sainsbury's (Newton Abbot) don't sell it at all. That’s the factual, promotional stuff over with, now for my experience of the drink! This creamy coffee coloured liquid tastes delicious! One small sip is so very, very creamy, much more so than Baileys, it is most exquisite. What follows is a slightly fruity taste and a burst of alcohol, again, not as strong as that experienced with Baileys, although it contains the same amount of alcohol (17% by volume). It also doesn’t smell as strongly of alcohol, but it does smell a little fruity. There isn’t much else to say. I like to drink mine over ice and have not yet tried using it in cocktails, however, I have found some recipes on the official website and have picked a few of the ones that sound most interesting to share with you here. Be sure to visit amarula.com and check out the Springbokkie though!!! Zambezi Sunset 2 tots Amarula Cream 2 tots coffee liqueur 1 tot/dash grenadine (for colour) 8 strawberries Blend all the ingredients, half fill a glass with crushed ice and pour the mixture over. Kilimanjaro 125 ml vanilla ice-cream 25 ml Amarula Cream 10 ml peppermint liqueur Combine all the ingredients in a blender, blend until smooth. Pour into a glass and garnish. Serengetti 1 scoop vanilla ice-cream 10 ml coffee liqueur 10 ml sambuca (yellow) 15 ml Amarula Cream 5 ml cream (thick) Place the ice-cream scoop in a glass, with a straw through the middle. Pour coffee liqueur into the glass. Pour yellow sambuca over the back of a spoon onto the coffee liqueur to form a layer. Do the same with the Amarula Cream. Pour a thin layer of cream on top and garnish. African Breeze 1 tot Cointreau 2 tots Amarula Cream Cover the rim of a glass with sugar. Fill glass with crushed ice. Pour a measure of Cointreau over ice, fill with Amarula Cream
                          and garnish. Also available from the website is a list of recipes using Amarula. These include; Amarula Finalé, Amarula Ice Dream, Frozen Amarula Soufflé, Praline Delight, Chocolate Colletes, Amarula Truffle Dreams, Amarula Fondue Fantasy, cake, venison, drumsticks, bread and butter pudding. At the website you can also find out about adventure tours in Africa, how to adopt an elephant and other information about Amarula. It is well worth a visit as it is pleasant to look at, easy to navigate and full of useful information. Much of the factual information presented here, has been reworked from the site, although I have missed out quite a bit. There are many more cocktails to view too, so take the plunge, view the website and try some Amarula today!

                          Comments

                          Login or register to add comments
                            More Comments
                        • Product Details

                          A wild fruit cream liqueur. Amarula is a South African cream liqueur made with the fruit of the African Marula tree (Sclerocarrya birrea) which is also locally called the Elephant tree or the Marriage Tree.