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The Lamb-a-roo - Diana Kimpton

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2 Reviews

Illustrator: Rosalind Beardshaw / Paperback: 32 pages / Publisher: Gullane Children's Books / Published: 1 Mar 2007

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    2 Reviews
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      16.07.2013 14:55
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      Lovely story to share

      We have a massive amount of books in our house as I have always read to my 2 little girl and my eldest daughter is even reading books by herself now so reads to her younger sister which I think is really nice.

      I bought this book in the range as part of their 4 for £5 range even though this book has a RRP of £5.99 so I got a bargain, I find the range in The Works are great and you can often pick up a bargain.

      The book is a little bigger than A4 which I think is a lovely size book for sharing, the front cover has the title on it in large bright blue writing and the name of the author who is Diana Kimpton and the illustrator who is Rosalind Beardshaw neither of which I have ever heard of before. The main picture on the cover is of a Kangaroos holding a lovely fluffy looking little lamb, the cover is brightly coloured and the animals look really friendly so I can see why Sophie picked it up in the shop.

      The story is about a lost little Lamb who is looking for his Ma and a Kangaroo who wants a baby, the pair come across each other and the Kangaroo take the Lamb into her pouch and takes care of her. The Lamb is concerned as he is different from all the surrounding Kangaroo group and starts to compare himself to them and starts trying to train to jump as he realises that he can't jump like they can.

      When the poor Lamb cannot improve his jump he tries to stretch his back legs to be taller which of course still doesn't work, he ends up finding an old empty house with an old mattress inside so takes the springs out of the mattress and attaches them to his feet. The Lamb is really pleased that he can now jump high and he bumps into his ma and finds she has covered herself in a wooly blanket to look more like him, the Lamb is really upset that the Kangaroo doesn't look like his Ma anymore and the Kangaroo is very sad that the Lamb doesn't look the same anymore. The pair of them shed the parts they have added and are happy to be back to normal, the Lamb realises he doesn't mind being different from his ma and decides he is the happiest lamb-a-roo.

      This story is lovely, it isn't so long that Sophie loses interest but it isn't over in 5 minutes flat like a lot of children's books, the pictures are all nice and bold and are not overrun with detail. The story itself is lovely and shows that you don't have to be the same to be happy which at the moment is a lovely message for Sophie as she is beginning to notice differences between her and her schoolfriend's and we have recently had upset as she is unable to do a handstand.

      Emily doesn't like this book as much as Sophie does and seems to wander away about half way through it but she is only 2 so I think it's a little too long for her at the moment. I would give this book 5 stars it is a great quality book and lovely story plus of course I got a bargain when I bought it.

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      23.04.2013 21:44
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      A warm tale about family love and fitting in.

      This is a book that has been loaned from both the school and local library on many occasions. For some reason, my youngest son is really drawn to this story. I can't put my finger on why, but I think he likes the warmth from it, and perhaps identifies a bit with the main character of the little lost lamb who doesn't really fit in as that is kind of what his own life has been like. Whatever the reason, he picks this gentle story regularly so that we can share it at home.

      Lamb has been lost in the middle of no-where. He is discovered by a herd of kangaroos, and one of them adopts him as her little baby. Lamb is happy but is concerned that he is not like the other little lambs as he doesn't look or act like them, and this makes him a bit sad.

      One day they come across an abandoned house, where the lamb discovers some springs from a mattress and starts to bounce around like the other kangaroos. However, at the same time, his Maaaa finds a wooly blanket and covers herself in it to look like her baby. Neither of them are left happy with this arrangement, so they go back to being themselves, which is ok as they love each other dearly.

      To me, this is a really gentle story. There is not that much going on within it and it is not overly exciting once you have read it once in my opinion, which seems to be shared with my older son, who will listen but is not that bothered. My younger son however does not seem to get bored with it, and likes the relationship between these two creatures and is charmed by it.

      The illustrations in this book are lovely, all highlighting the action in the story well. On some of the pages describing the lambs attempts to learn to bounce there are many littler illustrations which kind of remind me a little of a comic strip and it really helps give you the idea of what the text is trying to say.

      The blurb describes this as "a heart warming tale celebrating diversity and love." This is a good description of what you find in this tale. For me, the message is, it doesn't matter what you are like, your family will love you as you are. Something that children will like to hear as they are experiencing the wider world and realising they are a little bit different from how they are at home.

      Because of its reasonably short length and gentle moral tale, I feel it is best suited for children from about 3 to 5 years old judging by the reaction of my two children to it. It is well written, and while not the most exciting of tales, it does engage my son greatly each time we read it together.

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