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British Car Auctions (BCA)

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      03.07.2012 11:02

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      RECENTLY BOUGHT A CAR THROUGH BCA PADDOCK WOOD WITH AN ENGINEERS REPORT STATING CAR WAS ALL OK, YOU GET CHARGED EXTRA FOR THIS, CAR WAS A TOTAL PIECE OF WORN OUT CRAP, NEXT MORNING ON STARTUP IT MAKES HORRIBLE SOUND JUST LIKE A DIESEL AND ITS PETROL, THEY GET OUT OF THIS BY SAYING POSSIBLE PULLEY NOISE. WHEEL BEARINGS SHOT, AS THEY ONLY DRIVE CAR AROUND A CARPARK.AUTO GEARBOX WORN OUT, AGAIN THEY ONLY DRIVE IT AROUND A CARPARK, SHOULD HAVE GONE TO A DEALER AVOID! AVOID ! THESE ENGINEERS MUST BE TRAINED AT HALFORDS! THEY ARE NOT QUALIFIED.......

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      07.11.2011 15:50

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      Be very wary of buying at BCA

      My wife went to Measham car auctions caravan sale, she looked at several caravans, bid on two or three and bought one. A year later she wanted to upgrade so put her caravan on Ebay, with all the details including the CHRiS number. There was a lot of interest until one bidder checked the number with HPI and found that there was outstanding finance on the caravan when it was sold by BCA. At the auction, especially if you are bidding on more than one caravan, there is no way of checking if there is outstanding finance on them. You trust the auction to be at least legally selling the item you are bidding on. After phoning BCA and being offered no help, my wife has had to spend, two weeks so far, phoning Black Horse Finance to try and sort the problem out. She has lost time and money, her caravan has reduced dramatically in value and she is out of pocket, thanks to BCA. The matter is still not resolved and the winning bidder has reduced his offer, even if the finance is sorted. So, all I can say is BUYER BEWARE, you might not legally own what you win at BRITISH CAR AUCTIONS and don't expect BCA to be very helpful when you report the problem to them.

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      03.04.2011 20:35

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      Don't never ever go to BCA

      I was looking for quite while to buy a new car for the family. Visit quite few dealserships, internet and got fair idea on the prices of the car I want to buy. I heard of British car auction and decided to give a try. i spotted this large new car auction in Bridge house, book a day annaul leave and reserve a hotel room to spend a night and to be fresh for next day sale.
      As soon as we walked in to auction we were asked for 1000 pound deposit in order to be able to bid on a car. the auction started in time and I was surprised to see the car going over delaers price. I said to my friend probably its early thats why people are bidding so lets wait it might get better towards the end.

      Waited all day infact wasted all day, wasted money, time and regret going to the auction as it does not make sense to pay delaer prices on sold as seen. I went to dealer and spend the same money which i could have spent in the auction, test drive the car and got one year manaufacturer warrant.

      In m opinion don't be fooled by auctions as you will end paying the same price as dealership. Do your price comparasion before walkin into auction as the auction to me is just waste of time and money.

      Good luck with your new as I know how hard it is to have a perfect car of one's choice.

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      16.03.2011 14:11

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      jonnsy what is this website of this girl ??? would be intrested to have a look!!

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      09.11.2010 15:48

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      i hope that i wont end up out of pocket it depends on the mistaken car is sold and i redeem the mone

      I went to Brighouse yesterday.8/11/2010
      Hall 2
      I made a mistake by looking at the lot order as they came through and made a bid
      the auctioneer had resent lot BS001 CAR reg YF05 YCR which appeared after lot BS016.
      I thought, I was bidding on LOT BS017 A VAULHALL CORSA DE58 XLV.

      I Spotted my error when I went to pay the deposit AND THE LOT NUMBER ON TOP WAS BS001.
      I Immediatly informed the cashier of the error and she explained that i had to purchase the car.
      I went to the front desk and they also informed me that i must pay for the car i did not want.
      It was a genuie error on my part and i admit i made a mistake as i did not take a closer look at the car or the lotnumber as it came through as i expected that all the cars ran in lot order.
      I compleated the purchase as instructed.
      It seems that a human error can prove expensive even though the error was spotted by me immediatly.
      My issue is that Brighouse should have rules in their terms in the event of this type of Human error.
      i don,t visit auctions that often and a genuie error was made by me which will prove expensive.

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      15.07.2008 23:17

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      i bought a car from BCA with no tax i want to sell the car on with tax how do the dealers do it i dont know if they register the v 5 in there name to do so ! but i dont think so as this would add another owner on V5 DOC.. does anyone know or do they simply do this to tax the car . regards jason

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      14.01.2005 02:48
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      Everyone loves a bargain. And when it comes to buying a used car, everyone has a theory on how to find one. So we go through the tireless process of looking through papers, ringing anonymous people for test-drives in places we have never heard of. Then it happens. We lose our bottle and head down to the local dealer and pay through the nose for a “safe” deal.

      Well I nearly did the same thing except I was determined to rewrite the end line. I bought at auction. Yes those scary bidding halls filled with crooks and swindlers. At least that’s what I expected. In reality buying at auction was incredibly fun and a relatively safe bet.

      British Car Auctions are the biggest such group in the UK with a network across Europe. This is big business and it’s happening most days of the week around the country. The majority of the punters are car dealers but there are a growing percentage of private buyers attending and not losing their bottle.

      The process is incredibly simple. Each car is presented for sale. Every car has been checked so you can be sure that it is not stolen or defaulting on finance. Some are “sold as seen” which means just that. No warranties. Some are sold with warranteed mileage so you can be sure the figure on the clock is legit. Some are sold with a warranty against major mechanical fault. This sounds good, but the warranty only lasts one hour after auction, so you will need to take a mechanically mined friend.

      The cars are parked in a lot for inspection prior to the auction. Cars cannot be started or opened. They are then driven through the bidding hall in running sheet order. As they pass into the hall, buyers get their only chance to scramble a look inside a door or perhaps even a peek under the bonnet. The bidding process then begins. It’s like very episode of Bargain Hunt you’ve seen, only with bidding gestures 1000x subtler. The hammer falls on the highest bid and the car is sold or “provisionally sold,” which means the car may have a reserve price to be negotiated upon after the auction. The winning bidder is legally obliged to place a deposit of £500 pound on the car.

      Car presented are either fleet vehicles, trade-ins from reputable dealers or the lucky-dip of cars from private punters. It’s only the last group that should strike the fear into your heart and the buyer really should be aware of anything running through this bidding hall.

      I found British Car Auctions to be a thoroughly efficient and understanding company to deal with. I saw the car I wanted through the online search database - late model Vauxhall Zafira with low warrnteed miles. It was being auctioned in Manchester. I asked a few questions about the car on email. It was answered the next day. I caught a train from London. The car went through the hall. I put up my finger until the bidding stopped. One hour and three signatures later I was driving my car home at £2500 under dealer list price.

      My advice would be to stalk out the car you want. Be prepared to bid to the dealer list price and you should get it. Remember to include the £250 buyers commission in your price. Remember that you will be bidding primarily amongst professionals. Look as amateur as possible. Put your hand up nice and high, holding your What Car? Price guide. Once they sniff that you are a private buyer and have no idea, they should scatter leaving you with the car that you want, minus the annoying car salesman.

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        23.11.2001 05:15
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        More tips for cheaper motoring. If you are fortunate enough to have pots of cash and want more car for your money, get rid of that newspaper, get off the Internet, leave those car dealerships alone and get down to BCA (British Car Auctions). Now BCA started as Southern Counties Car Auctions back in 1946, and now have some 23-auction houses in the UK, and many more scattered around mainland Europe. Handling 1 million plus car sales and turning over 2 billion plus, they are certainly not a back street auction house! Cars sold privately at these auctions account for only a small part of their daily auctions, and the main bulk of their stock comes from main dealers, fleet companies who have upgraded their vehicles, Finance Companies repossessed motors, and even Ministry of Defence vehicles. Always check their schedules at www.british-car-auctions.co.uk to find exact dates and times of sales. Normally a large indoor arena with covered display to view the cars at your convenience on the morning of the sale. I find the staff very helpful if you are at the sale early, they will take the time needed to ensure you fully understand what the procedures are and guide you in the right direction. I will say that once the sale gets underway, these people run a very tight ship and wont have the time to show you around and explain in detail. In the selling arena, (some have two or even three arenas, with various cars going through. You will find more information in the brochure, which costs some £2 from their reception.) You will find some bench style seats where you can plant your bum and watch the sale, and you have ample opportunity to view the vehicles while they are being driven in The auctioneers are clearly spoken, although the bids can race away at times, they settle towards the end, allowing you your chance to get involved. They have a Cafeteria serving hot and cold food at somewha
        t reasonable prices and toilet facilities are clean and well maintained. I mentioned earlier that they sell a brochure, and you will be lost without one. All in all, the auctions themselves are very professionally organised and run, and take some three hours plus to complete. AUCTION TIPS Here are those handy little tips that stop you doing something daft! Never be the first to bid! This makes you look keen and as you are a new face, someone may try and push the price up by bidding against you. If you have bid and someone bids higher, wait before bidding again. Same again, when they first start there may be ten or fifteen bids on a car, and at the early stages, everyone wants to get their bid in. Stand back a bit and wait until it slows down. You may have already noticed the experts with their little black trade books. Watch them, if they open the bidding on a car, it is worth having. When they stop biding, then you don’t want to go much higher than them. Listen to the car as it ticks over in the arena. Is the driver is revving the car slightly aggressively; it may be because it has starting problems. Another tip is when they drive it in, listen for a smooth acceleration and gentle stop. If they are revving it high to drive in, it may need a new clutch. If there are three or four of the same vehicle, let the first one go and see how much it makes. If for instance you see an S registered Mondeo go through for £4000, then the next ones will make roughly the same. This allows you opportunity to re-evaluate your budget and pick a better car. Never bid on a car that no one else wants. Meaning if the bids are slow and very low, there is a reason. Sometimes cars have already been through “the Block” (trade term for auction!) 3 or 4 times, and their owners want more money than they are worth. Sometimes these cars have som
        e serious faults and the traders know which ones they are, so they don’t bid on them. Never go over your budget! BCA do not take credit cards, to my knowledge, although switch/delta are acceptable. You must leave a deposit on you vehicle straight after the bid has ended, and then you are given a chance to drive the car and make sure it has no problems. You get an indemnity on the car, meaning if it has been stolen, or written off, or even if it has outstanding finance on it, you may get your money back. CARS TO BUY Cars such as Fleet Disposal Cars are my favourite. Usually with full service history and well maintained. Normally 3 years old with above average mileage. Tend to go cheaper than retail dealers sell them for. Here is an example; 1998 Mondeo LX 1.8 5dr hatchback S plate 50 thousand miles Retail average price £5999 Auction price £3500 You save £2500 Now I always assume that I will have to spend another £300 to fix the car and take in to account that there are selling charges to pay, usually about 1.5 % of the hammer price. So therefore a £3500 car would actually be nearer £3600 and then £300 for any little things that need doing to the car. After all this you have still saved over 2 thousand pounds against main dealer forecourt prices. Make sure that when budgeting to buy a car that you take this money into account. Finance repossessions are sometimes good buys, but check them out. There are genuine cases for repossession, such as unemployment and death. Then there are the idiots who had no intention of paying and have run the car into the ground. That is why you have to be very careful. If you know a mechanic, or someone in the trade, it is worth taking them along. I charge £100 regardless of whether you buy a car or not, and I suggest that you pay no more than that for expert advice.
        Direct from Dealer Cars. I am very, very careful with these vehicles. Why hasn’t the dealer sold them? Unless you know the dealership they came from, leave them alone. Let the traders fight over them, and unless there is a lot of interest from them, leave it. I used to send cars up there that would cost too much to repair to make them retail cars. This is the norm, I am afraid. However, there are dealers, such as Mercedes Direct who have an auction policy for all their part exchanges, which means they don’t sell them form site. These cars are worth looking at and going over with a toothcomb. Private Cars A big no-no. People only put cars to auction when they need money desperately, or when they cant sell them privately. Sometime they put cars to auction that are going to cost a lot of money to repair. Whatever their reasons, I, personally, wont even look at them. All in all, there is so many different reasons why to buy and why not, that I could write a book about it. What I will say is watch the experts, they are the ones who look like they know what they are doing and usually have the little trade guides (NOT PARKERS GUIDE!) UPDATE As rightly mentioned in the comments by our "Dont miss a thing" guru Sydney (Wasnt that the girl in Scream? ;o) Go and see them start the particular car you are interested in and check it out for warning lights, smoking (could mean head gasket has blown!)difficult gear change, stalling and anything that doesnt look or sound right. Have fun Angus Reid

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          21.11.2001 05:09
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          So you want to but a new car? What do you do? Read the newspaper and magazine ads? Visit a dealer? Import? Or perhaps buy on-line? The options are endless but only one is practical, economical, realistic, no beating about the bush and lots of fun!! Yes I’m talking about the Car Auctions. Maybe you’re like me and have nightmares of being swallowed up in a sea of mayhem and confusion, seemingly surrounded by aliens speaking a completely incomprehensible language. Well you’re right, it is a sea OF CARS, and it is mayhem OF LOW PRICES, and aliens who are just as unusual as YOU! Now why do I say this? I’m not a sales person (anymore), I don’t run a dealership and before Monday I’d never been in an auction in my life of any description. If, somehow, you are in possession of a bit of dosh, and you know that you definitely want to spend some of it on a decent car your first instinct might be to peruse your local paper or car magazine for private sales. Which are presumably cheaper than going to a used car dealer, which might be the second choice. BIG MISTAKE, according to recent statistics at least 30% of privately sold cars have something major to hide (What Car? Magazine) which will render the sale void. Mistake number two is going to the used car dealer because your guaranteed a stiff mark-up, in some cases up to 300% of the actual value of the car. I’m not an expert on all the stats (for more information refer to Angusreid’s opinions on ****). From my own point of view, as your average customer, I would say it makes sense to get the cars at the same place the dealers get them from. Question – would you get your shopping from Tesco if you knew you could buy it direct from the suppliers at no extra charge, in a single location, for a fraction of the cost? Of course not (I hope) because it seems logical to pay wholesale price for high value products if you have the opportunity. That’s wh
          at British Car Auctions is all about. I had a maximum budget of £4000 which I was willing to spend on a decent car. I went to my local Vauxhall (Network Q) and Ford dealers and they essentially told me to go away because their prices started from about £4500 upwards. Vauxhall told me it was because their cars were warranted, mark this point, as we shall return to it later. So there I was, £4000 to spend, and being reduced to scavenging through the heaps of private sale ads and scores of used car dealers. Now in this category there is no uniformity, there are practically no standards, people are seeking to make as much as they can OUT OF NOTHING! Think about it - private sellers have no reason to sell their cars. If their used car was worth anything they would trade it in or sell it to a dealer and get a better one, but logic to them will say a private sale nets more money based on their ignorance of the buyer – WHICH IT DOES. In this wilderness it’s a dog-eat-dog scenario where one blink could cost you many thousands of pounds. It’s lottery in reverse, where you are the one offering the cash prize and spend some time picking a winner. I can not remember how many times someone said to me “you could be lucky”, I think they should really say “who’s the lucky man/woman”. There are so many pitfalls that chances of survival are almost none existent. So what’s the solution? So my next step was to go to a “recommended” Used Car dealer because in my “wisdom” I felt that it would be “safer” to buy from a dealer a serviced car, with MOT, and a few months warranty. At least I would be mobile for a while before I had to deal with anything myself right? – WRONG! The recommended dealer offered me an L Reg. Rover 620Lsi in immaculate condition, full service history, 100000 miles, long MOT, 6 months warranty and 6 months road tax for £3500. I took it for a test drive an
          d was well impressed, I haggled him down to £3000 to compensate the high mileage and he accepted. Fortunately it was a Friday night so I persuaded him that we would finalise everything on the following Monday. Now it is important to bear in mind that I had waited for a long time to get hold of another car (last one gave up suddenly) I was becoming really frustrated with the shoddy bus service which meant I arrived home later and later as winter crept in. There’s a point at which you become so fed up of searching that you’ll settle for the first “reasonable” offer that comes along – this was it I was going to get this car NO MATTER WHAT. And I would spend the next fortnight trying to convince my wife and myself that I’d made the right decision. What you need at times like this is good advice. Someone who can draw on their knowledge and expertise to illustrate to you what the choices are and which direction to take. NEVER BE DESPERATE TO BUY – because the dodgy sellers are even more desperate than you!! I received a phone call on the Friday night from Angusreid in response to an email I’d sent earlier. I stated my situation and he promptly informed me that the cars real value was only £1500-£1700. He suggested I try the British Car Auction (BCA) as I was likely to get more for my money. I read the same opinion that he has posted in this category and he offered to give me live assistance via mobile phone if I should require it. I took the day off on Monday and trotted down to the local BCA. I got there early and enquired which cars would be up for sale. I could not get a clear answer from a single person as they all referred to rows of cars in general and then directed me to ask someone else. One got the impression that they are more used to “dealing with dealers” who know the ropes, who were there last week and can identify the new stock. This meant I had enough time to earmark particular cars when t
          hey would come up. Angus was kind enough to provide instant figures on maximum amounts I should bid for specific vehicles based on make, model, derivative, reg, mileage etc. They started off with vans and light commercials and proceeded to the Fleet and Lease vehicles (basically ex-company stock), which were the most popular. These are recommended, as you can be sure that most of them will have been serviced regularly and will not have any hidden info (HP etc). The auctioneers spoke clearly and afforded ample opportunity for bids to be made. Car Dealers were easy to spot as they would buy every third or fourth car at a bargain, to be sold for a fortune to unsuspecting customers. The crowd was thick for the first hour and a half and thinned out as the day wore on. You never know what order they’ll be driven in so its difficult to save your bid for specific cars, I did this a few times and was disappointed because the opening bids started higher than I was willing to pay. This will happen on the really good cars. Cars less than 3 years old will fetch the highest prices so depending on your budget you may wish to consider the next level. The auction had started at 12.15 (started 15 minutes late because the catalogues had not finished printing) by 3.30 there was only a third of the original crowd and the atmosphere had lightened considerably. I understand they would not normally take so long but they had so many cars to get through. But good things come to those who wait. Remember that there is no pattern of presentation, any car can come at anytime. Because there were fewer bidders the prices dropped as well. When an S reg Mondeo was driven up with 85000 miles, full service history, but no MOT, Sold As Seen, and a slight dent in the side I put my bid in at £2,300 and it was accepted. At first I thought it was a banger because I had not been able to inspect it closely. But today I’ve taken it for an MOT and it sailed through with no problem
          s. I only need to replace a CV joint and remove the dent, which will cost less than £200. So at the end of the day I have a vehicle worth £5000 – and only paid £2600 including auction fee. A dealer would do the same thing!! The auction floor was laid out in an organised way with most cars for sale inside and a few outside. They came in at one end in a queue and would take turns to enter the arena. There is a stand for customers on the one side, with wooden benches and on the opposite side is the auctioneer with the microphone and famous hammer. They took on average up to one and a half minutes for the cheaper cars (less than £1000) and two and a half minutes for the better quality ones. So things moved along quite quickly. They have a small restaurant for when you’re a little peckish and need a strong cup of coffee to energise you for another attack. Most of the vehicles are quite clean and smart although you can expect some high mileage. It is best to position yourself a few metres before the arena so that you can carry out a quick physical inspection of the cars interior, mileage, engine, boot, exterior etc before it enters. You can therefore assure yourself that you’re getting what you’re paying for. Although you are indemnified if you purchase a car with wrongly advertised specification. Standard deposit is £500 and the balanced should be settled within 24hrs. Payment is strictly through cleared funds ie Switch/Delta, Bankers Draft or Cash. Some bids are accepted provisionally – in other words the owner will have specified a minimum sale amount (a reserve price) below which they will need to be contacted by telephone, within 20minutes after your bid to confirm whether your offer is acceptable. Next to the auctioneer is a small window clearly marked 'Pay Deposit Here'. This is where you part with your £500 soon after your bid. Make sure you can identify the car i.e make/model, colour and note the reg plate
          if possible. The cashier is quite good though if you go straight to the window as they deal with vehicles instantly. In a provisional sale you may be asked to wait some 20min before you can finalise the sale. In any event give them about half and hour for your paper work to filter through. There is a neat reception area in the office section away from the 'noise' and engine fumes where you can relax on a sofa for a while. There is no announcement of which cars have been cleared (although they have airport style TV monitors hanging on the walls which presumably provided up-to-date information on processed transactions in their glorious past). There may be a small queue to negotiate but they seem to work as quickly as possible. Bear in mind that some customers have several vehicles to sort. Once your paper work is available, you have the option to defer payment till the next day or pay immediately. All the documents pertaining to the vehicle will be handed over to you including an exit pass and CAR KEYS! If you happen to have spotted where they parked your car after the drive-through, you can point it out to one of the drivers and they will clear a route for you. Like me you could spend the half an hour making a closer inspection of the vehicle. By the way, you can purchase your own warranty from as little as £120. So if ever you need to buy a used car GO TO YOUR NEAREST BCA otherwise you’re walking in the jaws of death. PS This is Nick’s (The Nick part of Gwenick) first opinion so please be nice ;-)

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            26.10.2000 01:58
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            Buying any used car carries a risk Whether you buy private, trade or auction. We've all heard of friends who've had bad experiences buying cars. Auctions tend to carry a bad name, often unfairly so. Whilst there are a number of small back street auctions who sell the rubbish that the trade can't shift there are a number of good auction houses. BCA at Blackbushe is the largest is the largest car auction in the country,owned by ADT they try to make buying and selling a car as easy as possible. Many people assume that you don't have any comeback when buying here but that isn't the case. When you buy there's an indemnity charge, this protects you against buying something thats been stolen, has finance owed, a false mileage reading or if it has ben written off. Should it have any of these then you are reimbursed. Similarly after the hammer has fallen should you find any major fault that was not declared then you have comeback.Cars are sold as seen, with engineers report, sold with named faults or sold with no major faults. Either way you have a declaration as to the condition with comeback. Cars costing less than £1000 or more than 5 years old are excluded from the above and are sold as seen. Never buy from an auction on your first visit, get accustomed to the procedures and prices. When you are ready to buy get there early, select a short list and inspect them. Get into the hall in good time as any comments by the auctioneer about conditions etc will be made once the vehicle is in the ring. Also do your homework before you go, there are plenty of low mileage, nearly new cars from rental, lease and company fleets entered. These represent excellant value for money as they will have been well serviced and fully depreciated. Go to the BCA web site for conditions of sale at www.british-car-auctions.co.uk. For pricing check out the Parkers price guide, the Buying Used Cars magazine and also www.au
            tomotive.co.uk/fleetnews gives invaluable information on residual values as well as actual daily auction prices achieved. With the effects of imports and falling new car prices in the UK it is worth checking these prices carefully as prices of new and used cars are on the way down. With care you should have a wide selection of well maintained nearly new cars available at low prices.

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