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Villages & Resorts in Isle of Man (Offshore)

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      12.10.2008 21:00
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      Great if you want to pay next to no tax - hard for younger couples as not much to do

      Just had a quick look at the review before this and I know its been a while - but thought I would give an idea of the IOM etc. The population is approx 72000 - of these I believe only about 40-45% are Manx people. There are 4 main Towns in the IOM. Douglas (the capital) in the East, Ramsey in the North, Peel on the West side and Castletown in the South. The island is approx 32 miles long by 12 miles wide. Tthe main "working" centre of the island is in Douglas - as are the shops. Dont expect massive shops - but there is a Tesco, M & S, Woolworths & Boots to name a few. The main employment industry is now in banking, offshore insurance and finance in general. It has been a number of years since the Island thrived on Tourism for its income. The local language is English and there are still a small number of people on the island that speak the local language - Manx. If you wanted to move & work on the IOM - you may need a work permit. There are a number of exceptions to this and these can include being classed as and IOM worker (married to an IOM worker or has a child that was born in the IOM), or is from a specialist occupation such as doctor, dentist, minsiter of relion etc. Unemplyment is low and is less than 1% of the population at this time. Living on the IOM can be expensive - as shopping (general food shopping) can be inflated and follows Ireland prices. Property prices for buying & renting are also more expensive than mainland UK. However - a lot of employers do offer a higher salary than they would on the mainland. It should also be remembered that txation is 10% for the lower band & 18% for higher tax band. Child Benefit is also slightly higher. From personal experience - the island in the spring & summer months can be beautiful, with some lovely beaches and rambling countryside. However in the winter months - when darker nights and wet & windy weather arrives - it can be very bleak and "cold". Its also times like these you have to remember that the only way to get on & off is by plane & boat and in the winter it is not unknown for either of these (especially the latter) to be cancelled due to bad weather! There is also very little to do & places to go for families & children.

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        05.11.2006 13:21

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        Hello,I am thinking of moving to the Isle of Man with my family,can anyone tell me if the cost of living is cheaper over there compared with South East England. Are there any visa's needed to move to or work in the I.O.M?I also need to find a good secondry school for my teenage daughter. I would be grateful if anyone can help with these questions. THANK YOU

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        25.11.2002 01:44
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        "No matter which direction you approach Port Erin from, the views are always breathtaking" It's true. I moved to Port Erin with my family earlier this summer, and my boyfriend will be joining us later this week. So far, I've hardly had a bad word spoken about it. I suppose it's because of the atmosphere. Port Erin is a seaside town, but without horrendous hustle and bustle. Yes, there are tourists but that only makes it more cheerful. People in Port Erin seem to have much more time for you than they would on tha mainland, and although the pace of life is slower we never miss a beat! Port Erin is set around a bay (including Bradda head village) and the dramatic Milner tower always has a sunset behind it (to see it, try perso.libertysurf.co.uk/ian.davey/isle_of_man1.htm). It takes about an hour of heavy walking to reach the tower, but it's well worth it. It is more than you think to wake up every morning and be able to look out over such a scene, maybe that's why everyone here s so happy! Even in dull weather the sea has a majestic quality, and I can see why it has inspired so much poetry and creative writing. Situated in the South West of the Island, Port Erin is about 30 minutes drive away from the capital, Douglas. Alternitavely, you can take the authentic steam railway, or just choose to look around the railway museum. Buses run regularly to most other towns on the island, and it is less than a 15 minute ride to the international airport, or 25 mintues to the English and irish sea Terminal. For tourists, there is a formal promenade full of hotels and guests houses, or alternatively there are many quaint bed and breakfasts for very good prices, often included as a package with travel. I would suggest the Cherry Orchard Hotel and the Anchorage Guest house, both very different styles but clean and comfortable. For tourists, there is a good mixture of night life and sightseeing. There is a guided nature walk round the bay in summer, or you can walk round it at your own leisure in the winter months. The town hosts several pubs, the best being The Haven and The Bay, both of which are reasonably priced with a relaxed atmosphere. For the young at heart, the town has nightclub, Talons, which thrives at the weekend and has a very friendly, non threatening atmosphere. For the more devoted clubber, Douglas has several clubs and bars. Port Erin has a variety of restaurants including chinese and pizza take-aways and the beautiful Falcon's nest hotel, as well as a supermarket for the budding chef! Although beware, unless you are a P>E resident the larger shops do try to charge tourists more than is neccessary. Once place you must see whilst visitng Port Erin is Calf Sound,a natural island now used as a bird sanctuary. It is about 5 mintues drive from the Promenade and seals and their pups can often be seen basking on the rocks. Just a few minutes from this, the Manx museum and National trust maintain an outdoor folk museum, typical of the manx crofting way of life and these two locations will amply fill a relaxed days sightseeing. Before tourism, Port Erin was a tiny fishing village, and it stills manages to maintain a lot of that quality today, a small local community, but still cater for tourists young and old alike. However, the Port contains a lot of Diversity, with a student marine biology laboratory lab and an international hotel school both on the Promenade. Port Erin has become a popular location for filming, and this year both Andrea Corr and Steve Kemp have visited the town as part of big selling films. As well as all the breathtaking views, Port Erin is very self sufficient and has all the usual local amenities, such as a swimming pool, church, primary and secondary schools, Post Office, Medical Center, Funiture shop, Newsagent....you get the idea! In summer, the town holds Surfing, water ski-ing and body boarding lessons for residents and tourists, obviously at a cost but they look like tremendous fun! Also there are plenty of tracks for mountain bikers, an 18 hole golf course, tennis courts and bowling green. The local surf shop has some good qualoty clothes and is a regualr haunt for the local beach bums! For the less adventurous, there are regular quilting fairs and shows, as Mannin quilters meet here every week. There is also an annual Christmas fair at the Cherry Orchard Hotel. This year saw Port Erin play host to an arts festival, which I'm told attracts artists and visitors alike every year. With a newly re-furbished arts centre there is place for the more cultured among us, there are regular musical recitals, amateur dramatics, art shows and society performances, usually very reasonably priced. To add to this, there is the beautiful Bridge bookshop, numerous antique stores and two of the best ice cream parlours on the island, even serving manx kipper ice cream (not one I've ever been tempted to try!) Well, what more can I say? Exceot that I bet you never thought so much diversity could be packed into such a small village which owes it's exitence mainly to the Victorians!

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