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      06.07.2012 00:48
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      A great walk, with some beautiful views

      *** Updated 28/9/12 ***

      My story
      ~~~~~~
      Climbing this was part of my 3 peak challenge. It was the last one we did, and despite us climbing to the very top, we couldn't see anything, all my photos are just of me and friends with a pure white background behind us, but trust me we got to the top.



      Location
      ~~~~~~
      Snowdon is the tallest mountain in Wales set in the area of Snowdonia, I had never been before and so didn't know what to expect, I heard it was 'moderate' climb and after Ben Nevis I was under the illusion this was going to be a breeze. We parked at base, were there was toilets (I think there may have been a shop or cafe, but I can't comment here too well as we never stopped by) The toilets we used was the disabled as at the time they was cleaning the separate ladies loo. The disabled toilet was nothing to be desired, it was cold, damp, and toilet roll on the floor (but we much rather use this than squat mid climb, so it was fine) At the end of the day you need to remember your climbing a mountain in a rural area and it's good that toilets of any sort are provided, and they had cleaners as we witnessed this in progress which is great.



      Paths
      ~~~~
      It started off very flat and smooth, it was just long paths, after what only felt like 30 minutes began a little more of a stepping stone path. Still on the fairly flat path, but you felt it a little more with your knees now, once you clear of these you then reach a peak with a beautiful waterfall and the purest looking lake ever. It was here that the true climb begins. I believe it is at the lake section were we then took the 'miners' path which is believed to be a relatively easy route; this is a little daunting as at this point the accent became more rock climbing than mountain walking ... it was a scramble to say the least. At some points going up, there is a very small (what some may call path) between you and the edge, which was a little off putting for myself who wasn't looking forward to these sections. Just as a piece of advice, time on the internet states 2.5 hours for this route, personally I'd add a little extra on as the daunting shock of the scramble, really does cause you to take extra care. This 'scramble' route goes on for some climb, however you definitely feel as though you are progressing, ever so steadily. At the top of the scramble you then have to take a left towards the top summit, this part is very smooth and it really does give you that indication that you are nearly there. On our way up I was a little concerned about the route down as the drops would be in front of us then, but fortunately it didn't seem that tough on route down.

      To go into some more detail the 'scramble' climb up was definitely not what I was expecting, so please prepare yourself for this, there was a group of us and this was great as we all helped each other out. We had 2 boys in front who took lead and helped find a good route for us, myself and another female was dotted further down the line with a boy always behind us, just for support really. A word of warning, do not look down, try your best to just stay focus of what's in front of you. I found that looking down as was on our way up was not good at all, I felt quite dis-orientated and it was very off putting; however I found coming down wasn't that bad at all, I think this was due to the fact that it's wasn't as obvious as on the way up; coming down just felt a little more natural.



      Views
      ~~~~
      The scenery is just beautiful, we didn't manage to get the true benefit of it, as we had our eye on the clock and also the weather was extremely poor. Rain and even fog and mist was what put most of our vision out. We managed to catch a few 'very quick' snaps when the clouds moved away, but you had to be quick. We also caught the most beautiful photo on the way down; which was a cloud of just pure orange, I think the sun had just set and we was catching the remaining air surrounding it. If you manage to go up here on a clear day I imagine it would be a beautiful sight. At the very very top you are met with another monument type feature (again a similar one was at Ben Nevis, and seems to be a trend of things to plant at the top of mountains) it was pretty much a sun dial again which tried to explain were and how far you could see 'obviously' on clear days, and therefore it meant nothing to us on the day we climbed.



      You get a certificate ?
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      I've been told that there is a functioning cafe at the top were you can not only buy something to eat and something warm to drink but also a certificate to say you have climbed to the top. I can only presume it was closed when we went up there, however I couldn't even see were this building was due to the weather. There is a also a working train which takes you up to the top if you are finding the walk tough or just want to take a easy route up and down. So therefore I suppose you could cheat and go up on the train, buy the certificate and pretend you truly climbed to the top;; however you will only be cheating your self if you do this :). We only saw the train track when we got to the very top, so I can only think that the track follows a different route on the way up to the top of the mountain. Personally I wouldn't fancy using a train to climb a mountain.



      Overall Opinion
      ~~~~~~~~~~
      My Overall view is that it was a lovely walk, I really enjoyed this one. The views were beautiful what we saw of them and the walk was pretty simple. Although we did see people with children and dogs up there, personally I wouldn't' recommend it, due to the 'scramble climb' which we faced. Also if you haven't done it before I would familiarise yourself with this first maybe on some forum websites or ask others who have climbed it, as if it wasn't for fellow members of our group doing this mountain before, we would have never believed nor guessed that the 'scramble' was in fact the actual route. As I have said, the reason for our climb was part of our 3 peak challenge, however I would definitely climb this again if I went away to Wales for a trip for example. Another pointer I'll make is that the route we took showed no obvious break spots. Yes you can stop anywhere for a minute, however if you was looking for somewhere pretty to take an hour picnic stop for example I can't really think you would find anywhere on the route we took. The only 'quiet' space would be at the bottom of the scramble near the lake (this would be beautiful, to take rest here, overlooking the crisp clear lake) however it may be busy or nosey depending what time you take your stop. Other routes of the climb, may have more quieter spots, so this could be an idea to research on. Another quick pointer, turn left when you get to the top of the scramble!

      Apologies I can't report back on some of the base camp features, such as top and bottom cafe, gift shop, parking ect, as this was out of my hands. But as a mountain and general climb it was amazing, and something I would love to do again.



      Extra info
      ~~~~~~~
      * Over 3,500ft
      * Highest mountain in Wales
      * 1 of 3 mountains as part of the popular 3 peak challange
      * Gorgeous views, but hard work too
      * Lots of various routes to take...even a train
      * Be careful AND be prepared

      I won't go into too much detail here as I did with my Ben Nevis climb, but as with any form of challenge or walk planned like this you need to take care. Be prepared and over prepared if needs be, it's pointless getting all the way there and realising "I should have packed them gloves or that extra bottle of water", it's better to take more than less in case you need it (yes your bag may be a tiny bit heaver, but it's better to be prepared) Research online of what previous weather has been like, what it's estimated to be like on your climb day. Take warm clothes, spare clothes (even if you leave your spare dry set in the car for when you have finished), plenty of food. Most of all be careful and enjoy yourself, take a camera if you can as it's beautiful up there and you can get some cracking 'screen saver' photos.

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        08.07.2010 16:10
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        It's not as difficult as it seems, well worth it!

        I have never imagined that one day I would climb a mountain. I have just come back from North Wales and I am glad to say that I climbed Mount Snowdon...half way. This is my review on my experience half way up the mountain.

        Mount Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa in Welsh) which stands at 3,560 ft (1,085m) is the highest mountain in Wales and the second highest in United Kingdom. The mountain is situated within Snowdonia National Park in the county of Gwynedd in North Wales.

        It's picture perfect at every angle; from glistening streams to sheep grazing grasslands and silhouette of distant mountains, it's also a photographer dream of capturing their magic moment. On a clear day, you might even see as far as Ireland, Manchester and the Peak District in England.


        Climbing Mount Snowdon is a big thing to me as I had lots of fear before the attempt. I worry about my fitness level, my fear of heights and falling. After much persuasion from my husband, I decided to take up the challenge.
        Taking the Snowdon Mountain Train to the summit is just too costly; a return ticket cost £25. We could do it one way and descend on foot but in the end we decide that we will walk as much as we can.

        We begin our route using the Llanberis path. This path runs parallel with the Snowdon Mountain Rail track and as I found out later, it is one of the easiest but longest paths to the summit. Its sounds quite misleading to call it a path, the initial road towards the gate are tarmac and it's pretty steep. After which, the path are made up of rocks, sand and rock debris.

        We decide to walk towards the grassland where the sheep were grazing. As we do not know where we were going but there was a feeling of adventure. As we trudged past the staring eyes of the sheep and their lambs, sounds of laughter and water came up in the distance. It was a low lying rocky stream and a family enjoying the sun on a big rock boulder. It was a pleasant and relaxing sight.

        Our walk finally brought us in the view of an oncoming steam train and we were able to capture a few photo shots of the steam puffing train. The Llanberis path becomes clearer as we head uphill and much to our amazement, it have so far been easy and we congratulate ourselves on the distance and the height we have surmount.

        The rest of the path was gradual, a little bit of a steep climb at times but nothing that I can't handle. Stopping occasionally to catch my breath and the scenery makes the walk pleasant. There was no rush and we even have time to chat with fellows walkers about their adventure.

        As we reach the halfway point, a quaint stone cottage appears before us. It is also a cafe, which is simply delightful. Dusk is upon us and after 3 hours of walking, we decide to head downhill. Walking down can be challenging too. There are times where we have to scramble on loose rocks, hop and skip on the rocky path and the constant pounding makes my soles sore.

        We may not have reach the summit this time but the experience of being able to climb half way up Mt Snowdon makes us determined to come back for the summit. It was an exhilarating time for me as a novice mountain climber. I would never thought that I can make it this far and the admiring look from people in the train as they passed is pretty satisfying.

        If like me, you are unsure about climbing Mt Snowdon, take the Llanberis path. It might not be the most picturesque of all paths in Snowdon, the views on a clear day is still spectacular. To make the best out of your walking trip, wear a good pair of walking boots, carry extra clothing in case the weather change, bring sufficient water and some energy boosting snacks. Finally, take your time and enjoy Mount Snowdon.

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          08.12.2009 11:46
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          have a go

          Snowdon is the highest mountain in Britain outside the Scottish Highlands. At 3560ft (1,085m) it's not exactly an Alpine peak - after all you can take a TRAIN up to the top - but it is, surprisingly and wonderfully, a beautiful one, with a jagged, desolate beauty belied by it's relatively low height. It combines dramatic mountain scenery with lovely views to the coast and beyond (in the right weather, obviously). The star-shaped massif has four main peaks, of which the highest is Yr Wyddfa.

          Unlike many more remote British mountain areas, Snowdon gets rather crowded on good days in the summer, with thousands of visitors coming up on-board the Snowdon Mountain Railway and hundreds more walking up. Still, it has a lot of fine walking and can be reached by several well maintained, diverse paths which offer a variety from a reasonably easy amble to hard scrambling.

          ==Routes up==

          The longest, easiest and probably least attractive is the Llanberis path, which covers 5 miles and 3,200ft of ascent in 3 hours from Llanberis village, essentially following the route of the train. There is a man made (albeit stony) path which is clear all the way to the top. It's an old mule track (and still a bridleway) but you still need decent boots - don't attempt it in flip-flops and trainers aren't really good idea either.

          The most popular ascent routes start at Pen-y-Pass, five miles east of Llanberis. This is the start of the Miners' Track, The PYG (or Pig) Track as well as the most difficult route - so called Snowdon Horseshoe.

          The Horseshoe leads via Crib Goch, at first following the course of the Pyg Track. After Bwlch y Moch (pass of the pigs), the route turns west and Crib Goch. This is believed by some to be the best (or definitely among the best) ridge walks in the country - it's also very scary for anybody who is afraid of heights, and it shouldn't be attempted in winter without proper equipment, or even in good weather in high winds, as the ridge is very open and the drops very high.

          The PYG track skirts past the post-industrial landscape of a disused area of the old Britannia copper mine, several lakes and up to the Bwlch y Moch to then follow a zig-zag route to the "finger stone" where all the routes join the Llanberis path for the final ascent to the summit.

          ==My way up==

          We climbed Snowdon on a cold, rainy, spring day, when the sky was overcast, mist filled the air when it wasn't actually raining and the whole exercise seemed to have a purity of purpose that was, to be honest, alien to my rather sybaritic soul. I would have turned back nowadays, but then I was several years younger, at least five stone lighter, and eager to show I wasn't a wuss. We had driven all the way from Manchester through welsh rain, and the car was hired for one day only. And thus, up the Miners' Track we went.

          The first part of the walk felt strange and spooky: I still vividly remember the post-industrial landscape, with causeways and lakes, some broken machinery, what seemed like buildings growing out of the hillside. The lakes were clear, still and seemingly lifeless, surrounded by tortured, jagged rocks, gloomily atmospheric under the leaden sky. Wilderness can be alienating, but wilderness that used to be full of human activity has a particular poignancy.

          The ascent itself didn't feel particularly hard - though I probably wouldn't feel up to it today being completely unfit - even for a moderately able walker. There was a a bit of a mild scramble towards the upper reaches of the track, before all the paths join together at Bwlch Glas (Green Pass), marked by the "finger stone".

          Near the summit there is now a new swanky visitors' centre, built from granite and apparently melting seamlessly into the landscape, with cafe, toilets and other facilities (but no hostel).

          When we came up, there was just the grotty old terminus of the Mountain Railway, good for a cup of tea and a bit of warmth, but not much else.

          On clear days, views from the top are, apparently and entirely believably, wonderful, stretching across the whole of Snowdonia and towards the Irish sea. On the day we went up there was no views - so after the aforementioned cup of tea, we went back down, following roughly the same route, though, having managed to get temporarily lost, we found ourselves scrambling down a rather precarious scree, unsure whether there will be a path at the end of it. Luckily, there was and we emerged safely near the lakes and the mine area for what was uneventful if cold and wet home stretch.

          ==Other routes==

          Alternative ascent routes include the Watkin Path from Bethania Bridge, located to the south of the mountain, reputedly one of the most spectacular routes up, past a series of cataracts and an old slate works. It has a stretch of a loose, steep scree slope towards the end.

          From the west, Snowdon can be approached via the easy Snowdon Rangers Path, from the Youth Hostel near Llyn Cwellyn on at A4085 (or a Rhyd-Ddu stop on the Welsh Highland Railway).

          ==Was it worth it?==

          Well, of course it was - my expereince is that it always is, when the pain is gone what remains is the memory of some sort of achievement. Despite the lack of views, the climb itself was interesting, and I can always take the train up next time!

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            30.08.2009 00:10
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            A fabulously varied and exciting place to be, and a satisfying challenge to complete

            Magnificent mountain.

            Compared to Scafell Pike, which proudly the boasts the highest inches in England, this majestic peak is leagues ahead. I have been lucky enough to have been up it five times (once cheatingly on the engaging rack railway) and have had a completely different walk every time.

            Snowdon or Yr Wyddfa, has a summit height of 3560 feet. Despite the Ordnance Survey selling out to Brussels I am not listing this in metres, but I can tell you that it does reach four figures.

            Most people will approach Snowdon from the east, because of where it is.
            I like great mountains to be quite reclusive about their presence until you get quite close and then to display themselves in al their glory once you have made enough effort. Snowdon looks good from any angle, but my favourite approach is from the wonderful A5 road, one of Thomas Telford's masterpieces, along with the Caledonian Canal and the Pontcycyllte Aqueduct. What a man! But I digress.

            When you are within about five miles of Snowdon, quite near to Betws-y-Coed, you quite suddenly get a wonderful vision of a huge and composite mountain. You are looking at Snowdon and into the legendary Horseshoe.

            A little further on, having switched to the A 4086, after Capel Curig (this is a famously wet place that quite often has the highest daily rainfall in Britain - six inches one day with four or five the next is not that unusual) and you arrive at the eastern corner of the whole massif. You can carry on down the 4086 to travel down the spectacular and exciting Llanberis Pass, stopping in Llanberis. From there you can walk up the Llanberis path - relatively easy walking with some fine views into the valley, but also very popular because it is the easiest walking route to the top. It would be unfair to describe this route as dull, but the others are of such high quality that they all get A* and this one gets just an A.
            Another way of getting up from Llanberis is to take the train. Now this may the best thing for you if you really can't get up a mountain, as it's not often that you can ride a train up to 3500 feet! (You do have to walk a tiny bit at the end to get to the very top, but you can call at the summit cafe first!). It's not cheap - £25 return and £16 single for adults - but there are some deals: check out the website at http://www.snowdonrailway.co.uk/times_prices.html

            The most exciting, dangerous and famous way to climb Snowdon is to do the Snowdon Horseshoe. This starts at the eastern corner, and takes you straight up to the challenge of the knife-edge ridge of Crib Goch. Don't do this if you have no head for heights. There are some parts where you can sit astride the ridge (yes, be careful!!) and wonder at the immense drops on both sides. It's awkward, but wonderfully thrilling to walk and scramble this way. Having got over the exposed danger, there is then quite a stiff climb to the summit. You come down by another ridge, so that you have walked the line of a horseshoe. In the middle, are lovely lakes, and other paths, the Pyg (Pen Y Gwyrd) track and Miners' Track. This is an invigorating and picturesque descent.

            A few years ago I went up by the Watkin Path, which starts along the road to Beddgelert, a village to the south of Snowdon. This goes up a valley first of all, with Gladstone Rock an important feature. PM William Gladstone reached here at age 82 in 1892 to make a speech on the opening of the Watkin Path, so self respect dictates that you should do your best at least to get here. Sterner tests wait ahead, and the path bends quite a bit to get you up on to a stunning ridge - the same one that you will descend when starting down the Snowdon Horseshoe. It's always nice to come a different way down if you can, and there's a nice way to do this using the ridge that runs due south of Snowdon's peak, before rejoining the Watkin Path.

            Most recently I went up yet another way, the relatively easy but visually very appealing Rhyd Ddu path. You can park at Rhdy Ddu station and should not jib at paying £4 for this as the money goes to looking after Snowdonia. So pay up and smile! This starts quite gently and like virtually all the paths on Snowdon is clearly marked and so easy to follow. After a while you turn left and then go up a ridge, climbing rather more steeply. Gaining the top of this gives you good views into Cwm Glogwyn, and its lakes, but, having looked, you keep back from the edge, especially if the wind is at your back. Cloud cover is always a potential issue on Snowdon, and can put you in mist around here. A little further on, the ridge is steep on both sides. It's very very good, but not frightening in the way the Crib Goch can be, although to be there in a stiff wind could be a test of fibre. The Rhyd Ddu ascent can be combined with the Snowdon Ranger descent to make an excellent horseshoe walk. This comes down using quite a few zigzags to lessen the gradients, and gives fine views of virtually the whole walk.

            There are a few - well any number - other ways to the top, but those are the main ones.

            You mustn't go up Snowdon with out taking some precautions.

            Most routes will give you an 8 - 10 mile walk in which you will climb 3000 feet or more. If you are a fit fell walker, you will get up in 2 hours or less. If you are not, then it's 3 hours or more, and then you have to come down. It's best to make a good early start, so you might be setting an early alarm!

            Check the weather forecast for Snowdonia. The Met Office site is very good. Be prepared to change your plans if the weather misbehaves or if you know that you are being too ambitious. There's no shame in turning back, and you don't want to become another unfortunate statistic on the mountain.

            Bring a good survival kit - plenty of food and water, waterproofs and warm clothing. It might be 20 degrees and sunny 50 miles away, but it can still be 5 degrees and blowing a gale in fog at the top.

            Bring a proper map (1:25000) and a compass, and make sure you can use them!

            Wear proper walking boots, and make sure that they are both a good fit and nicely worn in.

            Tell someone where you are going and take a mobile phone.

            Snowdon is not a killer mountain, but if you treat it casually then you could come unstuck.

            If you start and finish in different place,s there is an excellent bus service, the Snowdon Sherpa, that runs around the foot of the mountain. I have not used it but I think you can get on it all day for about £4.

            It is a mountain with fabulous views as you go up, and, so I believe, from the summit, although I have not enjoyed a summit view yet. I'll have to go back! It is a majestic place.

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              28.08.2009 21:54
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              deserves its positions as most popular mountain to visit in Great Britain

              Snowdon standing at over 3,500 feet tall is the highest peak in England and Wales and one of the tallest in Britain. It is also known and the busiest mountain in Great Britain.

              It is important that when climbing Snowdon and any mountain, that you go properly prepared making sure to carry plenty of fluids and food (if required) and being as Snowdon happens to also be one of the wettest climates in the country, that you bring proper waterproof clothing.

              There are a number of routes to get up the mountain and the Snowdonia National Parks website (www.eryri-npa.co.uk/english/index.php) provides excellent help showing the locations of each path, how to get there and photos of various location up each route. The routes range from easy gradual beginner walks, which can suit those of all ages (I've seen a man holding a baby walking up there once followed by and very elderly couple!) to steep assents fro experienced walkers. Walks generally range from 7-10 miles (round trip) depending on which route you take. Whichever you choose always make sure that the you are sufficiently prepared and qualified to take the walk you choose as conditions up the mountain can change rapidly and you don't want to risk finding yourself in trouble!

              Of course if walking isn't your thing then there's always the Snowdon mountain railway which runs from Llanberis up to the newly opened Snowdon cafe at the summit. I have noticed that there is a set of reviews on the railway and therefore suggest that you read those for more details.

              The views from the mountain are spectacular, certainly the best in Wales. On a clear day you can see as far as Ireland it is said! With this in mind it is important to check the weather before you go and the me office has up to date details of the weather for the Snowdon area. there is also a handy site showing a webcam view from the summit:-
              http://www.fhc.co.uk/cams.htm

              In conclusion, Snowdon is an excellent climb for all ages and well deserves its positions as most popular mountain to visit in Great Britain.

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                19.08.2009 20:53

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                A great mountain to climb

                Heh. What a climb. However you get up there, prepared to be amazed. Just don't go on a cloudy day. There are a number of paths, from more family paths to some more traditional mountain climbs. There is one that is only for very experienced mountain climbers, which I would not reccommend to anybody who is not very experienced. You might find one group a week doing this path. If your looking for a challenge, then I would suggest the watkins path. Fairly steep, and 6 miles long, you should look to do it in about 4 hours 20 minutes (Should take 6, I did it in 4 and a half hours with small stops, not including the stop at the top). Be warned, the last 400 feet are dangerous, filled with loose rock and shale, it is very easy to slip and fall, and if you do that, its a long way to slide. If you do take this path, expect to get scratched to hell on the wall down. But thats the fun of it. When you do reach the top, It is busy. But for some reason, you will always look at other people going up the other routes, and kinda get the satisfacton that you took a harder way up. First thing you must do, is go into the cafe, get something really nice to eat, and a cream jam donut. They are a must have. Honestly. Its worth spending some time up there, just looking around. Like the picture here on dooyoo shows, the lake is one of the best parts to see. The picture does not do it justise. The equipment I would suggest bringing is about 1L of water each mabey, a few snacks, a camera and some binoculas.

                Overall it is a must do if you are in wales, really worth it.

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                27.05.2009 16:51
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                One of the best mountains for variety, and the amazing cafe on top!

                It is fashionable to decry Snowdon and moan about the cafe and the masses of tourists on the summit. In fact, Snowdon rates amongst the most beautiful mountains in the world. Whichever direction you approach it from the size will impress you. Its starfish shape gives six magnificent ridges each with their own special and individual character. The deep valleys range from the easily accessible to hanging valleys only reached by complicated scrambling.

                This moutain really has something for everyone! You can even go up on the mountain railway! I must admit when you trudge up one of the harder routes and you get up there and you see old ladies in flowery skirts sipping tea, it can be a little demoralising. However the railway is a wonderful way to see the mountain if you are unable to manage the climb.

                At 3560ft this is the highest mountain in Wales and also England. The views from the top are awesome, if you get a clear day that is! You can see the nearby coast, and look out over the granduer of Snowdonia!

                The easiest route up would be from top of the Llanberis pass. You start from the car park at the top of the pass and follow the clear path, (concrete) there is not that much assent as you start from so high up the mountain. Is a nice easy walk but often very busy, full of '3 peakers' who dash up and down as fast as possible, there are much nicer ways up the mountain.

                For the all rounder would recommend the Watkin Path. There is a car park and toilets on the A498 about 4km from Bedgellert. This is the starting point and there is a fairly easy path up the mountain. You pass by some interesting slate mines which are full of history and stories. As you move up onto the ridge the walking is a little more difficult. But still you should be fine. The last section is a scrable and the path is easy to loose. There are crags and cliffs around so take care, especailly in poor visiblitly. Given fair weather though this is not a hard route and should be within the reach of most walkers.

                If you fancy something a little more challenging try Crib Goch. This is probably the most challenging way up Snowdon. Again you start from the top of Llanberis Pass, this time though instead of following the tourist route, you turn off this and head up to Crib Goch Ridge. This is a fantastic route, but is very difficult, especailly in poor weather. If you are not an experienced walker or with one, dont attempt this. However if you want a challenge this is the way up for you. You can come down the easy way with the tourists to return to the car park.

                Overall a wonderful mountain, so much variety, I have been up 4 times and enjoyed it everytime! Although everytime I have been up it has been cloudy, which is of course rather gutting! One day sure will get up there on a clear day. Have fun!

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                  11.08.2008 00:11
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                  Fabulous views, accessible to all, which for me also takes away some of it magic

                  Snowdon or Yr Wyddfa to give it its Welsh name is the second highest mountain in Great Britian.

                  It is located unsuprisingly in the Snowdonia National Park in north west Wales and at some 3559 feet high is a not inconsequental lump of rock!

                  It is also quite possibly the easiest mountain in the British Isles to get to the top of as it has a railway to its summit, this starts at the town of LLanberis and as I say will carry you all the way to the top (well not at the moment it won't as they are currently updating the building at the summit so it only runs to halfway up for the time being).

                  The building at the top will contain an info centre, cafe and gift shop as well as the obvious "station" for the train. This facility is a bone of contention for me, to some degree it spoils the mountain, although I accept it allows people the chance to get to the summit that otherwise could not make it. I think the cost of this service though is nothing short of a rip off. £22.00 per adult and £15.00 per child!

                  For me the best way to appreciate the mountain is to walk up it if you are able to. There are several routes up including one from LLanberis which is the easiest but is quite long at approx. 11 miles for the round trip.

                  The "Miners" track from Pen-y-pass is shorter at approx 7 miles but requires a bit more effort for the last part of the ascent. If you are very brave there is the ridge walk of Crib Goch which is a fabulous experience but only to be attempted if you are an experienced walker/climber and in good weather conditions for most mortals.

                  The views from the top on a clear day are stunning and at the moment are only spoilt by the ongoing building work and the intrusive noise produced by the workmen.

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                  • More +
                    05.08.2008 07:39
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                    everyone should climb this peak at least once in their lives

                    I climbed Snowdon for the first time a few days ago on my first visit to Snowdonia, located in the north of the national park, the mountain stands at 3559ft high and is the second highest peak in the UK.

                    There are approximately six routes to the summit, ranging from the easiest Llanberis Path, which starts at the town of Llanberis and follows the track of the railway to the summit, right up to the full horseshoe which takes the route over Crib Goch and Crib Y Dysgal, 2 fine ridges but not for the faint hearted as there is a large amount of exposure over these!.

                    Currently at the summit, a new centre is being built, which will offer a cafe, shelter, toilets, weather and route information, it is behind schedule due to the harsh weather they have been experiencing!

                    I took my 5 year old and 9 year old up the mountain via the miners and pyg track, the miners track is easy and the route overall is 7.5 miles, considering the size of this peak, I felt it was quite an easy climb to the top and the far reaching views are amazing if you get the weather!

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