Welcome! Log in or Register

Liverpool (England)

  • image
£4.95 Best Offer by: subsidesports.com See more offers
34 Reviews
  • time has moved on
  • Litter
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    34 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      19.02.2010 23:46
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      You will not be disappointed. Something for everyone!

      Being from Liverpool, I guess you could call me Biased..

      Liverpool has everything that you would expect to see in a city and more.

      For the party animals we have a fantastic nightlife. Streets lined with bars, pubs and clubs which play everything from R&B, Dance, Rock, Metal, 80's... I could go on forever but I won't.

      For the shopaholics we have 4 shopping centres. Liverpool One, Met Quarter, St Johns Precinct and Clayton Square. All filled with shops for every budget. You will not be disappointed with the range of shops available.
      Liverpool One is one of the best shopping complex's I have visited. Nearly as good as the Trafford centre in Manchester.

      Liverpool hosts a vast array of cafes and restaurants. From McDonalds to La Tasca.

      If you like sight seeing, why not visit the all famous Matthew Street. Birthplace of the Beetles. Have you picture taken sitting next to Eleanor Rigby or next to the yellow submarine?
      Take a ride on the ferry across the river Mersey or stay on dry land and visit the Tate gallery or Liverpool museum.

      There is something for everyone in Liverpool. You will not be bored during your stay.

      Liverpool may have a bad reputation, it's not as bad as you may think. Give it a try!

      These days my home may be London but my heart will always be in Liverpool.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        14.12.2009 12:06
        2 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A great weekend away in Liverpool

        I have wanted to visit Liverpool for a while now so in Oct this year Me and my friend went to Liverpool for a weekend at the end of October. We got the train from Glasgow central station and this took just about 3 hours to get to lime street station this is very central and the train cost about £48 each return. We booked an apartment with the International Inn and this was £150 for 2 people for 2 nights in a 1 bedroom twin bed apartment it is in the city centre south hunter street we got a taxi to it the first time but after that we found it was only a 10 min walk to the shops pubs and clubs . Liverpool is a great city I highly recommend it for a great weekend away with the girls or romantic getaway there is so much to do and see. The shopping is great same shops as everywhere else but i was surprised as my favs shops like primark, topshop and river island were all really big and had a great selection of stock. There's lots of great places for a bite to eat. The nightlife was great the first night we headed to victoria street and went to the living room and then on to mosquito good music friendly bouncers great night. The second night we headed to concert square to see what that was like good selection of pubs and we headed to mosquito again. Great night Great weekend.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          02.06.2009 23:39
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          35 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Don't pass up the chance to try the place.

          'Liverpool's the Pool of life.' So Carl Jung wisely stated
          He wasn't wrong, what other place has seen so much created?
          We've got the finest humour and the TWO best teams in Footy,
          two tunnels, two cathedrals and the famous Docker's Butty!*

          We've got the Tate down by the docks with loads of modern piccies,
          (I think they're weird myself, made from dead cows and broken biccies!)
          We've also got more trees per head than any other city,
          They're good for climbing on for kids and make the place look pretty.

          There's the 'Dicky Lewis'* statue, a cathedral that's a funnel,
          (If you want to see New Brighton you can use the Mersey tunnel.)
          The Museum of the World is here and there's no better place
          because centuries of sailors means we're home to every race.

          The waterfront is famous and the finest way to view
          is to travel on the Ferry and see buildings old and new.
          Standing proud above it is the stately Liver bird
          If a virgin passes underneath, it's wings drop off, I've heard!

          We've got the Aintree racecourse, which runner will you choose?
          The Philharmonic Hall and Pub that's famous for it's loos!
          St Georges Hall and Lime Street, The Adelphi and The Crack*
          And if you got lost in Scotty Road* we'd never get you back.

          The River Mersey ambles through, it's quiet now for ships
          unless you're living on the Wirral or want a few day trips.
          But once the Docks saw seventy percent of all world trade!!
          Everything was shipped through here with fortunes lost and made.

          Our Maritime Museum shows the truth of 'Nitty Gritty'*
          and how the slaves were treated makes you weep for shame and pity.
          And seeing shackles still in place as you walk along The Goree*,
          you know that here's a city with a long and chequered story.

          We've got a Huge new Mall*, (as though the place was short of shopping!)
          And a visit to the Cavern Club is sure to get you bopping.
          The restaurants are brilliant! (but for food come to my house,
          it won't cost you a penny for a great big dish of Scouse!*)

          The City's tarted up now and refusing to be dead
          even though that Thatcher woman tried to knock it on the head.
          We've got style by the bucketfull but not a lot of money,
          but we can make the whole world laugh 'cause Scousers are dead funny!

          Of course we have our scallies*. What city now, has not?
          But we have a lovely city and we're proud of what we've got.
          And if you can't find somewhere, just ask anyone you can see.
          you'll get seventeen opinions, nineteen jokes, and all for free!

          If you haven't been to Liverpool you'll get a huge suprise
          we're not a bit like we are shown through lazy media eyes.
          The butt of jokes about criminals, our accent brings derision.
          Just come and have a look yourself and make your own decision!


          (I thought you might have trouble with the language here, and so...
          To make it easy for you, the translation's just below!) :o)

          *Docker's Butty. - Massive sandwich made with anything handy.
          *Dicky Lewis. - Large, very nude statue on Lewiss' department store.
          *The Crack. - Famous Liverpool pub.
          *Scotty Road. -Infamous housing estate.
          *Nitty Gritty. -The lowest tier of berths in a slave ship.
          *Goree.- The Goree Piazza, a street on the Pier Head waterfront.
          *New Mall- Liverpool One Shopping centre.
          *Scouse- Stew.
          *Scallies.- Scallywags, an affectionate name for a rogue.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments
          • More +
            13.11.2008 17:39
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            1 Comment

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            A great place to go

            Liverpool is a great place to go i have been here so many times and i have never been let down. Liverpool is now known as Liverpool Capital of Culture there has been a massive change to make it a better place and it has worked, Liverpool now has allot more to offer everyone including the new Liverpool Echo Arena, which holds all major concerts. There is so much to do especially for tourists there are so many sights to go see, you will need more than one day to go and look around so you might want to book one of the many hotels situated in Liverpool. Here are just a few places you may want to visit, If you are a Beatles fan you are in luck as Liverpool is the hometown of The Beatles so a day out to see The Beatles Story is a must, this is situated on the Albert Docks and is very easy to find. The Beatles Story is open 7 days a week 10am till 6pm so it is easy to make a full day of this, you may also want to visit The Cavern Club were The Beatles played. The Walker Art Gallery is also a must as they have allot of new exhibitions by Ben Johnson to mark 2008 Capital of Culture. There are so many other places such as The Maritime Museum which tells the history of the world's greatest ports, Sightseeing Open Top Tour Bus which takes you around Liverpool stopping at twelve destinations were you are able to get off and look around each tourist attraction, you may also want to visit The Grand National which is held at Aintree 5 miles from the city centre it's well worth a visit, there is so much more the list can go on forever. If you are more of a party person this is the place for you, Liverpool is well known for its night life there are all major pubs, clubs and bars situated in Liverpool such as Garlands, Babycream, Revolution, Cube, Crazy House, Old School, The Village there is something to suit everyone's taste in music. If you prefer to shop there are plenty to splash your cash about in which includes all big brand names such as Ted Baker, Topshop, Topman, Sony, Karen Millen, Fred Perry e.t.c. Liverpool is very well known for its Football Atmosphere from 2 of the biggest clubs Liverpool Football Club and Everton Football Club they are well worth a watch if you are planning on visiting Liverpool but you may want to book tickets in advance. It is very easy to find your way around Liverpool there are plenty of taxis and buses, Liverpool has a main train station that travels to and from all major cities. Here are some sights you may want to visit before planning your journey www.liverpoolfc.tv, www.evertonfc.com, www.liverpool.com, www.visitliverpool.com and www.liverpool08.com.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              21.09.2005 21:30
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              8 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              a great day out for all the family

              My brother and I, went on the guided tour of Liverpool Football club and Stadium back in March, as part of my brothers 21st birthday present.

              As fanatical Liverpool supporters this was a must do thing, once and a while, although admittedly this was my first time.

              We approached the ground amongst hundreds of people, some who i'm sure were just milling around, while others were joining the huge Que to buy champions league match tickets for the Juventus match.

              Outside the main Liverpool retail shop, stands a bronze statue of a great Liverpool manager, who i'm sure most people will have heard of, Bill Shankley.

              He was the Manager from 1959-1974, in that time he won the club, 3 League Championships 1963-64, 1965-66 and 1972-73.

              2 FA cups 1964-65, 1973-74,
              1 UEFA cup 1972-73.
              1 Second Division Championship 1961-62.
              3 Charity Shields 1964(shared), 1965(shared), 1966.

              He is without a doubt one of the best managersof his time, and his managerial skills as a coach won him the hearts of all Liverpool fans to this day.

              He was once quoted as saying "Some people believe football is a matter of life and death, I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that." Bill Shankly.

              The Tour
              **********
              We joined the que for the tour, and were greeted by our two tour guides, they gave a quick run down of what we would be doing and where we would be going.

              As we passed through the still very long que for match tickets, we were taken around the side entrance, were the players park their cars on training and match days.

              We entered the same door that they would use and it was explained that on training days, the players would be taken by coach to Melwood, the training ground in West Derby.

              On the return they would be brought back on the coach and the coach door would park exactly outside the door to the changing room, and two stewards would stand either side so that no fans were able to get close to the players.

              This was not always the case, as I have witnessed myself at times before, but has been brought in to place due to an incident in which a player was hurt by an over zealous fan.

              On walking through the corridor to the changing rooms, we were able to get a feel for ourselves, of what it must be like for the players, after a hard days training.

              We were first shown the visitors changing room, basically a white tiled room, very clean inside, a table for treatment of injuries was on one side of the room, while the benches with coat hooks were on the other, there was also a whiteboard for displaying tactics of the game on.

              Next we went into the Liverpool dressing room, a slightly smaller room but much the same layout, chilled drinks cabinet, with Lucozade sport in on one side with the treatment table, and on the other were the Football shirts of the players all hanging ready for the next game.

              The only room we did not see was the shower room, due to hygiene.

              We were given a talk by the tour leaders which was both interesting and full of humour, as to some of the things the players get up to on matchday, such as practical jokes on each other.

              After the talk, we were allowed to take as many photographs as we wanted with the shirts, and even pick them up.

              As we approached the tunnel and steps to view the Football terraces and pitch, we were given a short talk on the history of players that would touch the Anfield Crest above the steps as they would go onto the pitch for good luck.

              After a few more photos here, it was time to feel like a player once again as we came out into bright sunshine, and face to face with the hallowed green turf of Anfield.

              It looked absolutely stunning, and as flat as a snooker table, immaculately manicured, with its different shades due to the way it is mown, there had been a shower of rain moments earlier, which made the grass glisten in the sunlight and extra special.

              Unfortunatley, we were not allowed onto the pitch, and were warned that anyone caught doing so would be prosecuted, as it was an offence to do so.

              We sat in the dug out where all the substitutes and Manager and coaching staff would sit, and were told more of the history of the football ground and the possible move across the park to a new and bigger seat stadium.

              We were allowed more photo opportunities and that concluded the tour, in all it lasts about 45-55 minutes.

              You are then given the opportunity to go into the Liverpool Football Club Museum upstairs, and view the trophy room.

              This is a must, as it is here you can see the history of the club through the early years, to the present day.

              There are lots of glass cabinets in here with old football shirts and boots worn by ex-Liverpool players, their medals, football programmes, cups and other memorabilia.

              There is a 60 seat cinema, were recordings on a loop are played, presenting the history of the club,

              sounds from the Kop are played when in the late 60's and early 70's, they would sing Beatle songs, can you imagine 40,000 fans singing "she loves you, yeah, yeah yeah".

              As you approach the trophy room, you pass several glass cabinets with various cups and trophys, and then you see it, the long cabinet with the "Fab Four" in it, (no not the Beatles), the four European Cups that Liverpool had won prior to the 5th in May 2005.

              An awesome sight, all that silverware gleaming at you from every glass cabinet, also here are, the treble Trophy's the Worthington Cup, F.A. Cup, UEFA Cup of 2001, various League cup trophies, Championship trophies of Division One, Super cups, European Super Cups and Charity Shields and even the World cup medal from 1966 from Roger Hunt who helped England to victory against Germany.

              The tour guides are very knowledgeable and witty, and will answer any questions that you may throw at them, this is a wonderful tour for all the family, even mum would like this, and comes with my recommendation as must do.

              I hope you enjoyed the tour, but please take a look for yourselves, and take your camera.

              Getting There
              ***************
              BY BUS
              **********
              There are bus services that run from Liverpool City centre every 15 minutes and stop right ouside the main entrance, these are 26 or 27, 17B,17C,17D, 217 or the 68 and 168 from Bootle.

              BY CAR
              *********
              From the North
              ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
              Leave the M6 at Junction 23 and take the A580 (East Lancashire Rd) signposted to Liverpool. Follow the A580, passing under the M57 (11 miles) then under a railway bridge (2.75 miles) finally (0.75 mile later) turn left onto the A5058 (Queens Drive) towards Widnes.
              Proceed for 0.5 mile turning right at the lights into Utting Avenue. Pass under the railway bridge which continues into Arkles Lane. Please note that this area is a residents parking zone and a valid permit is required to park your car in any street within this vicinity. The ground is just to the right at the far end of Arkles Lane.

              From the South and East
              ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
              At the Liverpool end of the M62, keep in the right hand lane and take the signs for A5058 (Queens Drive).
              Stay on the A5058 passing St. Matthews Church (2.5 miles) finally turning left (in 0.5 mile) at the lights into Utting Avenue (Asda should be just visible on the right as you approach the lights).
              Pass under the railway bridge which continues into Arkles Lane. Please note that this area is a residents parking zone and a valid permit is required to park your car in any street within this vicinity. The ground is just to the right at the far end of Arkles Lane.

              From the Wirral and North Wales
              ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
              From the end of the M53 or A41, pass through one of the Mersey Tunnels (Toll Fare). Whichever tunnel you use you should take the A59 (North/Preston) as you leave the tunnel. Follow this road until you see signs for the A580 (St. Helens and Manchester).
              As you reach the junction where the A59 meets the A580, keep in the right hand lane (A580), which turns right after the lights onto a hill (Everton Valley).
              Please note that this area is a residents parking zone and a valid permit is required to park your car in any street within this vicinity. As the road climbs up the hill at the start of the A580 (Everton Valley) keep in the right hand lane. After the first set of traffic lights, use the right hand filter lane to turn onto the A5089, signposted Anfield. Anfield is down this road (Walton Breck Road) on the left hand side.

              BY TRAIN
              ************
              Lime Street Railway Station is two miles from Anfield. A taxi from Lime St. will cost about £4.00 for up to 5 passengers. Buses go from nearby Queen Square Bus Station.

              BY AIR
              ********
              Liverpool John Lennon Airport is approximately 10 miles from the ground, and taxis should be easily obtainable. Alternatively, you can catch the 80A bus to Garston Station and change at Sandhills for the Soccerbus service.

              Opening times:

              Every day of the week from 10am until 5pm. Last admission 4pm. ON MATCH DAYS ADMISSION IS FOR MUSEUM ONLY. THE LAST ADMISSION IS 1 HOUR BEFORE KICK-OFF.

              NO STADIUM TOURS ON MATCH DAYS.

              Cost:

              Museum & Tour: Adults £9.00, Children/OAPS; £5.50 Family: £23.00
              Museum only: Adults £5.00, Children/OAPS £3.00, Families: £13.00
              Special deals for schools & groups.

              IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED BOOKING IN ADVANCE FOR STADIUM TOURS.
              All times and prices subject to change at short notice.

              BOOKING HOTLINE: 0151 260-6677

              The Museum & Tour Telephone booking line (0151 260-6677) is open between 9.30am-4pm only. The Museum is trying to meet the intense demand for bookings, but cannot respond outside these hours. Please try to be patient at this very busy time!.

              Special birthday cards, unique to LFC tour available for £2.50. Can be presented to the person celebrating their birthday on the tour in the dug-out! Just let them know and pay in advance.

              LIVERPOOL FOOTBALL CLUB
              MUSEUM & TOUR CENTRE
              Anfield Road,
              Liverpool
              L4 OTH

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                19.09.2005 17:14
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                11 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                Stylish, cultured, lively - but still a bit cheeky!

                If you think that Liverpool is going to be non-stop homage to the Beatles and the Cavern Club you'd be right. But Liverpool is more besides and these days it's a hip and happening city that has done much to shake off the dowdy, run-down and depressed image it had in the 1980s. My personal musical hero, Pete Wylie penned a song called “Heart as big as Liverpool” describing his love for his home city: a city that has become synonymous with resilience, good humour and warmth. But are these claims deserved?

                I visit each December and can confirm that there is much for Liverpudlians to be proud of. Liverpool is often over-shadowed by its near-neighbour Manchester but I feel that the former is a much more friendly place and deserves the reputation it has for the warmth of it's welcome.

                If you are spending a weekend in the city I can recommend a number of accommodation options to suit all budgets. At the top end is the Crowne Plaza down by the Liver Building and close to the landing pier for the famous Mersey Ferry. It is ideally situated for access to the main city centre area and also the visitor and leisure attractions of the Albert Dock. A little more individual is the Hope Street Hotel, a boutique with impressive rooms and prices to match. The Feathers Hotel on Mount Pleasant is a mid-range hotel and is situated just a short walk (up the hill) from Lime Street Station and the main shopping area. Travellers on a budget will be pleased to know there are a handful of cheaper hotels such as the F1 hotel next to the Albert Dock and a brand new youth hostel near the Liver Building. Wherever you plan to stay, you should be aware that hotel rooms are VERY hard to come by when Liverpool Football Club are playing at home.

                So, you've got somewhere to stay - what is there to do?

                Where do I start? I suppose the Albert Dock is as good a place as any. The Dock is just one of the success stories in the regeneration of Liverpool and this area is one of the most cosmopolitan parts of town. You could say that, with its shops, visitor attractions, bars and restaurants and stylish warehouse conversion apartments that it is almost a small town in itself.

                The dock was built in 1846 to unload and store cargoes from all over the world. The buildings are handsome red brick structures and are very imposing. The buildings make up the largest collection of Grade 1 listed buildings in the UK. The cluster of buildings around the main part of the dock house visitor attractions such as The Beatles Story and the Tate Modern Liverpool, some bars and restaurants and of course the Granada Television studios where Richard and Judy used to be broadcast from. There are also a few shops and these are typical of the shops you get in touristy places - why do they think you want to buy tartan in Liverpool?

                I can recommend visiting the Beatles Story - it's fun and interesting and there's a great mock up of the original Cavern Club as well as lots of outfits worn by the Beatles; the story is told chronologically as you make your way through with music to match playing in the background.

                The Tate Liverpool does not have it's own permanent collection but stages visiting exhibitions so check in advance to find out what is on when you're there.

                The Albert Dock offers a variety of eating possibilites from a traditional pub serving a good selection of meals to upmarket restaurants and trendy bars serving tapas-style dishes. I would say though that the Dock does not really have any child-friendly eating places. Also some parts of the Dock are quite open and if you are sitting outside at a cafe or pub keep an eye on the kids!

                While you are down at the Dock a great thing to do is take a ride on the Yellow Duck Marine Tour.
                The Ducks are reconditioned ex-WW2 amphibious vehicles, which means they can be used both on land and in the water.

                The tours leave hourly from the Dock and first take you on a tour of the city centre with a commentary as you travel. Unfortunately it can sometimes be hard to hear the commentary while in heavy traffic. The Duck then makes its way back to the dock where you get a terrific splash. I thought it was great but kids will absolutely LOVE it and they can even have a go at steering the Duck once you get into the wider part of the dock.

                You can buy tickets from the tourist office in the Dock and it costs around £10 for adults and £8 for children but you can get discounts by buying a book of vouchers which will give you good reductions on all the attractions based around the dock.

                The main part of town has all the usual chain stores but for more unusual items head for School Lane for more unusual shops. There is a great street market in Chinatown on Sundays with fresh produce, spices, homewares and delicious street food on offer.

                To see the two cathedrals for which the city is so famous, and head up Mount Pleasant; before you reach the top there are a couple of good antiquarian and second-hand bookshops. At the top you come to Rose Street. Turn right for the red stone Anglican cathedral and left for the modern looking Catholic cathedral known by the locals as "Paddy's Wigwam". When you look at the two, it's strange to think that, in actual fact, the Catholic cathedral was finished before the Anglican. Both are beautiful churches but if I was to recommend just one to visit, it would have to be the Wigwam. Go inside and at the right time of day the light pouring through the stained glass windows is gorgeous.

                Just around the corner on Hope Street is the Philharmonic pub. Known to locals as the "Phil", it is possibly the grandest pub you'll ever set foot in. It's all mosaic floors and Victorian tiles in rich shades of red and green. There is a tremendous horseshoe-shaped bar behind which are ornate mirrors and elaborate chandeliers hang from the ceiling. The stained glass fanlights are something else again!

                Apart from the beer, what everyone comes to the Phil for are the toilets! They are magnificent and this is why they have been voted, on many occasions, the best public toilets in Britain. It's actually the mens' loos that are the ornate ones (The ladies are nice and clean but that's all you can say about them). The mens' have immensely high ceilings, ornate brass fittings and amazing ceramic tiles. Ladies - if you want to see the toilets for yourselves - just ask a member of staff and they will check to make sure the coast is clear. Don't be shy - they're used to people asking!

                As you would expect, there is plenty of choice for good eating in Liverpool but I would particularly recommend the Lower Place on Hope Street which is in the basement of the Philharmonic Hall and is popular with the pre and post-performance crowd for the Philharmonic Hall and the Everyman Theatre or Zorba's - a family run Greek restaurant on Lecce Street just off Mount Pleasant.

                The city centre is easily covered on foot but public transport is good if you're going further out of town. Most tourists do the Mersey ferry and it does give good views of the city skyline but really, unless you want to go over to the Wirral, it's not a must-do activity. A good trip is the Beatles bus that takes you to all the main locations like Strawberry Fields, the childhood homes of the members of the Beatles and Penny Lane. If you are a fan, this is an easy way to see all the sights in one go.

                Liverpool has a happening club scene - the best known is probably Cream which you'll find just off Parr Street but there are loads of other cool places in this area. To catch live bands try the Lomax or the Academy although there are loads of pubs advertising live music too. The city has a thriving comedy scene and I reckon the best venue is Blue, down at the Albert Dock. There are a number of good theatres staging repertory theatre and hosting touring productions.

                The city has a wealth of museums and galleries covering anything from football (at Anfield) to the city’s maritime history. My personal favourite is the Walker Art Gallery (opposite Lime Street Station) which has amongst its treasures some interesting and important Pre-Raphaelite works. Generally, the city has a collection of fantastic looking buildings that reflect its significance during the Victorian age in particular.

                I hardly need mention the city’s sporting connections and the presence of Liverpool and Everton Football Clubs is felt all over the city – in murals in subways, the clothes people wear and the affiliation of city centre pubs. There’s also the horse-racing – the world’s best known race, the Grand National is held at Aintree Racecourse a couple of miles from the centre.

                Liverpool is a vibrant city that is fast developing a reputation for style. However it is not as expensive as, say, Leeds or Manchester and I think has more to offer families than those other northern cities. Its people really do live up to their reputation for friendliness and good humour, offering good service in hotels and shops, as well as good company in bars and clubs.

                While you can’t escape the Beatles connection, there’s more to Liverpool than Matthew Street (these days a cheap and tacky side street which, other than to see the statue of John Lennon, should be avoided). The number of cranes in the city skyline prove that Liverpool is a rapidly changing city. I hope that new developments don’t rip the heart out of the English city with by far the biggest heart.

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                  More Comments
                • More +
                  21.08.2002 05:05
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  8 Comments

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  • Litter

                  This may well cause some ill feeling from Liverpudlians. It is not personal, nor is it intended to be, I know there are many fantastic people in Liverpool, great night life, lots of attractions etc. This opinion is not about them, its about the other side of Liverpool that We as a family have experienced. So, we moved up here from "down south" due to job relocation. We had had a lot of funny looks when telling people that we were moving to liverpool. "You will get your car nicked, your house burgled, people wear pyjamas there in the day, watch out for the sunbed shops" were all friendly bits of advice, some as a joke others not so. I had reservations but i tried to look on the bright side, we were buying a great house, twice the size of the one we had and a lot less to buy (that should have rang louder alarm bells). I talked to my wife about the great school that are kids would be going to (and it has turned out to be a good school so far, i have to add), the amazing variety of things to do there compared to gloucester and southampton (where we had lived before). Everywhere we looked there were family attractions, theme parks fairly close by, Liverpool Football Club (yes, we are all reds, sorry you toffees out there) the great shopping to be had etc etc. So far so good, then we moved in.... Two nights later are car was broken into. Hmm, though i, that was unlucky. Then there was/is the joyriders....We have a lovely park just across the road that has a duck pond, bridges, everything......except that a couple of weeks ago the same group of idiots that steal cars and torch them in the park decided that they would destroy the bridges hand railings, rendering them totally unsafe for anyone to use. There is the cars they dump in the duck pond after ripping the gates off at night. The bars and grills over every shop window at night. The fact that nobody picks up their litter....ever. We watch them walk along and casually drop things ev
                  erywhere and that is not just the louts, its the adults also. Its the bonfires they light in the park at 3 a.m. Its the alleyways full of rotting rubbish, the syringes that are found in the p[ark and the alleyways, the screaming shouting groups of 12-14 years old children running amok after midnight. "Pauses top take a breath" I kind of hope this makes uncomfortable reading, because it is uncomfortable writing it. But to hear so many lovely opinions about liverpool, watching the millions of pounds that they are pumping into turning it into the city of culture in about 6 years time rather than spending it on refuse collection and policemen on the beat, makes me wonder, have i made a terrible mistake moving here? I have lived in several major cities and nothing has prepared me for this. Oh, by the way, ~I do not live in anfield or toxteth or any of the "hot spots of the city", but in a neighbourhodd that, untill recently, was quite and quite respectable. I would love to write about all the nice things that Liverpool undoubtedly has to offer, but its kind of hard, sat at 10 o'clock in the evening listening to the scrambling bike ripping up and down the street and through the park...ah well.

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    31.05.2002 22:50
                    9 Comments

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    Having lived in Liverpool for seven years or so now, I thought it was about time I showed the good people of dooyoo a few of my favourite places in the city. Forget the Beatles and all the touristy places, they may be good but their charm wears off in a while. Welscome to some of my own personal favourite places, that make Liverpool, not simply the place I got my degree, but home. Firstly, the delights of Lark Lane. You can get to Lark Lane either by cab (about a fiver) by catching the train to St Michaels and simply walking for two minutes (signposted) or from Paradise Bus Station (Aigburth stand). Keith's Food & Wine Bar 107, Lark Lane Liverpool (0151) 728 7688 Keith's is without a doubt one of my most favourite places in Liverpool. Bohemian and eclectic with a wide menu and an even larger wine list, Keith's is the place where I feel like I am in Sex and The City. The food may take a while to get to you, if they are busy as they have no numbering systems on the tables, but you won't be in a rush anyhow. You can buy the paintings off the wall and chat the night away happily over a couple of bottles of house red. The food is quite expensive, well compared to a Macdonalds, but I know where I'd rather be sitting. The servings are ample and fresh and the staff are always polite. And the barman is quite handsome!! hehe They have even started serving vodka now! So spend a leisurely afternoon over a Halumi salad and a crisp chardonnay or order a jug of wine and make a pig of yourself, whatever you'll do, I bet your bottom dollar you'll go back for more. Next we have my favourite public house in the whole of Liverpool,some people think it's dingy but I think it is like a old man full of whiskey, interesting stories and good humour. The Albert Lark Lane Liverpool The Albert is a grand old pub in a great position. It is ne
                    ar to the park and opposite Keith's Winebar. The Albert has a number of nooks and crannies you can sit in. The seats may look a little threadbare, but the friendliness of this place makes up for it. Absorb the atomosphere while you sit in an alcove or in the beer garden (A must for sunny days). Offers large glasses of Blossom Hill wine, the large glasses of wine cost £2, but they do have a doubles bar for £2 also and the Guinness is pulled with care. They do not do food. A good old fashioned public house full of local charm. Highly recommended for a chilled place to chat to friends. Can get a bit busy on a Friday and Saturday night, so chairs can be of a premium. Another feature on Lark Lane is Maranto's on 59-63, Lark Lane Tel :(0151) 727 7200 Marantos is a restaurant and a bar. It is also one of the prettiest places on Lark Lane. The food is pretty average to be honest, but it is a good place to go to if you want to treat yourself to a high calorie dessert. It is a good place for a first date as it is quite posh and very chilled out, plus it accepts Switch, so if you spend more than you thought you can always use plastic. They do very nice cocktails. The upstairs bar is fairly large, with friendly staff (you can also use Switch at the bar if you wish, Steady on old chap). A starter sets you back £2.50 I usually have the bruchetta. The food ranges from burger and chips to pizza, rissotto and pasta dishes(Costing about a fiver). There is 8oz steak on offer if you want to splash out. You can ask what cocktail you want the bar is quite extensive although I usually stick to Pina Colada's(£4.00). They Have an ice cream menu and a desert trolley for those with a sweet tooth. Another good place to chill out and feel grown up is Rawhide Comedy Club, which is in the Albert Dock. The comedy club is open every Thursday to Saturday. Prices are
                    as follows: Thursday £6.50 ( £5 standing) Friday and Saturday £ 10.00 (£9 standing) The club opens at 6.45 pm. All shows begin at 8pm You can book and reserve tables by calling the ticket hotline on (0151) 7260077. Box Office is open from 10am to 6pm (Monday-Friday) and 2pm-6pm on Saturday. This line has a 24-hour message service. Tickets can also be purchased on the night, but as this is a popular venue, this is risky! Due to demand groups of three or smaller may be asked to share their table. HOWEVER groups of 10 or more get free day passes to Absolution Gyms, For details of this offer please call (0151) 707 9333. Laughter and chilling out in a spa - can life get any better? The Club offers an eclectic range of comedians. Details are available online at wwwrawhidecomedy.com. Be sure to check as there’s nothing worse than having to listen to someone who thinks they’re funny when they're not. You can also get the latest news on the club from radiocity96.7 (Joe Ferguson, 10am - 1pm Monday to Friday). I suppose what makes this place different from my old comedy club haunt The Zanzibar (God Bless it!!) is that it does FOOD. Laughter and Food. Fantastic. Food costs between £7.95 - £10.45 and the staff ask if groups of 8 upwards could order the meal beforehand. They also ask that food must be ordered before 7.15pm . This may sound fussy, but they are just being practical. Don’t ask me what the drinks cost because we bought them as a group. I had the Caesar Salad for £7.45. Sounds a lot of money but the dips and the bread and the care that goes into it makes it worthwhile, for a treat! Vegetarian options are provided. So if you want to feel like a grown up but still get a bit silly Rawhide is for you. YEEHAH!! PS Do not talk when the acts are on stage. It is annoying and rude. If , you find yourself at a loose end during the weekend and hunger for a little cultu
                    re, Liverpool has lots of art galleries inluding the open eye gallery, The Tate Liverpool, The University Of Liverpool Gallery and The Bluecoats Art Centre. Most recently however I visited The Walker Art Gallery. Walker Art Gallery William Brown Street Liverpool (0151) 478 4199 Open: Mon-Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 12-5pm Admission £3 adult (£2 concessions) This price includes the exhibitions mentioned With an art collection spanning from the fourteenth century, The Walker Art Gallery is an interesting place to visit. Especially if you are interested in European Old Masters , Victorian or Pre-Raphaelite works. Artists include Rubens, Rembrandt, Poussin, Gainsborough and Hogarth, alongside one of the most important sculpture collections outside London. One of my favourite pictures was: by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472 - 1553) 'The Nymph of the fountain' (1534) is fairly romantic and dreamy but my trip to the gallery was worth it, for this picture alone. Every month the gallery chooses a picture to highlight, this month it was 'An Old Inn Kitchen', 1922, by Frederick William Elwell (1870-1958). A free gallery talk about the artist will take place on Monday 27th May 2002 at 1.00 pm in Room 11. Other personal highlights included The Blessed Damozel by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, in the Lady Lever Art Gallery. This month the gallery is also focusing upon the works of Turner (1775-1851) in the feature Turner’s Journey’s of The Imagination, this will run from 24th May to 4th August 2002. The exhibition will include watercolours , prints and concludes with a number of late oil paintings including The Wreck Buoy. In addition to sketches and paintings, the exhibition includes displays of travel guides and optical devices like a camera obscura and a Claude glass - essential equipment for the traveling artist. Also of interest at the gallery is the exhibition of works by for
                    mer Beatle, Sir Paul McCartney (24th May to 4 August 2002). This gallery is accessible to the disabled, with a disabled toilet. Transcripts /Magnifying glasses and large print are available to borrow. There are also baby changing facilities and a café (both of which I did not use so can not comment on). These are just a handful of places that I think are worth a visit if you have gotten bored of the clubbing student thing. Yes, I'm sorry but at twenty six, I can no longer tolerate puking up and waking up with unsightly men. So try something different... Liverpool is much more than a place to get drunk in and wait in long taxi rank queues. I hope this opinion has given you somewhere to start :)

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      08.05.2002 06:21
                      Very helpful
                      (Rating)
                      3 Comments

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      • "stubborn attachment to late-1980s sports fashion"

                      I went to Liverpool yesterday. It's a weird place, I tell you. It is undoubtedly the most architecturally splendid major city outside London, with a surprisingly large swathe of the city resembling London's more famous Georgian districts such as Belgravia - all Georgian terraces and formality. The city centre itself begins unevenly outside Lime Street station with the juxtaposition of St Georges Hall and similarly impressive civic buildings with the typical retail mish-mash that characterises so many British cities. But it improves the closer you get to the riverside, with magnificent buildings and streetscapes that speak volumes of Liverpool's former wealth and power. The Cavern Quarter was uncannily redolent of parts of Covent Garden. And in Aigburth (I think that's the name) Liverpool has a suburb that rivals Birmingham's Edgbaston for leafy splendour. What makes it all so very Liverpool is the fact that the landscape is pockmarked with legendary landmarks: both cathedrals, the Liver buildings, the Radio City tower... But you can tell that Liverpool's fallen on hard times, that there's not much cash about. Some of it may look like Belgravia, but with a down-at-heel air instead of the patina of wealth that one might expect to surround such handsome buildings. Instead, there are huge blocks of derelict, gutted Georgian buildings. Amazing. And just off great avenues like Princes Street, dodgy estates prevail. For me the most interesting part of Liverpool is the Bold Street area, which is in the process of being regenerated in large part by the wonderful developer Urban Splash. The Mancunian apartments-and-bars formula is being meted out on its neighbour. Civic pride continues to manifest itself in Liverpool - not just in its huge and magnificent new Chinese arch in Chinatown but in the banner on a neighbouring derelict landmark building condemning the lack of effort made in finding a new use for it. Getting aro
                      und is easy: walk! It's a delight to do so. Otherwise there are four underground stations - a riot of Seventies beige and yellow melanine and formica - that form part of the Merseyrail network. And if you're staying the night, you could do worse that stay at the Campanile, a French affordable hotel chain usually found on the outskirts of cities but in Liverpool located within stumbling distance of the famous (and somewhat overrated) Albert Dock. The bad points: the local accent is, shall we say, "not for everyone." Indeed, it wound me up from the moment I arrived, and matters got worse from there. Furthermore, I was surprised to find the fashion stereotype amusingly true: scousers really do wear shellsuits - I was there for eight hours and counted eleven shellsuit-wearers, which is quite a lot given that it's, like, 2002. And there is a uniquely Liverpudlian fashion of tucking your shellsuit trousers INSIDE YOUR SOCKS. Oh my God. Why... But Liverpool's definitely on the up: as well as the new apartments and bars springing up, there are some fine new public spaces too. Liverpool is a sleeping giant. It probably won't catch up with neighbouring rival Manchester because Liverpool has lacked Manchester's tremendous good fortune. It's a shame: if there was more money in Liverpool, I am in no doubt that Liverpool would be the absolute king of England's provincial cities. There's so much potential - potential that will probably never be fully exploited. But it doesn't matter - scousers will always have a fierce and boundless love and pride for the place, and if the average visitor gives Liverpool a chance, they might, too.

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments
                      • More +
                        03.04.2002 09:11
                        Very helpful
                        (Rating)
                        13 Comments

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        Whether you were born here, visit or just come to study here, Liverpool will always hold a special place in your heart. Liverpool is one of those deceptively small cities that squeeze in so much - culture, entertainment, sports, religion… There is nothing that Liverpool does not have to offer. CULTURE: Liverpool has several theatres - The Empire (the largest and arguably the best), The Playhouse at Williamson Square, The Neptune on Hanover Street, The Unity Theatre, the Royal Court, Everyman and of course the Philharmonic Hall - so you're guaranteed to find something to suit your tastes, whether you want a concert, musical or play. There are also 3 museums - HM Customs & Excise National Museum which is inside the Merseyside Maritime Museum at Albert Dock (you can find out the history of Customs & Excise as well as the slave trade); Liverpool Museum (the largest of the local museums, incorporating archaeology and sciences); and the Walker Art Gallery (the ideal place for art lovers). ENTERTAINMENT: This is where Liverpool truly excels. What would you like to do today? Watch a live band at The Picket, visit Cream nightclub, trawl the bars or just take in a meal at one of Liverpool's many restaurants? Liverpool houses the oldest Chinese community in Europe so why not visit Chinatown for an authentic and delicious Chinese meal. Liverpool is also renowned worldwide as the birthplace of The Beatles, something that attracts many tourists every year. Take a ride of the Magical Mystery Tour, which takes in all the main Beatles landmarks or visit Mathew Street to see where The Cavern once stood or have a drink at the new Cavern. Whether you want to party or just relax, you're guaranteed to find something to do in Liverpool. SHOPPING: Liverpool is good for shopping but it lacks some of the shops you'd find in London or Manchester, e.g. Mango, Debenhams and Selfridges. That said, I've never found it to be
                        a problem - I'm sure any woman could still spend all day shopping here. Most of the shops are located on Church Street (Marks and Spencer, Next, Topshop, HMV and others), although a wander along to Bold Street (Karen Millen) or Lord Street (French Connection, GAP) as well as St. John's Precinct and Clayton Square is recommended if you're going on a major spree. There are plenty of cafés to rest your weary feet at - I highly recommend Liverpool bakers Sayers, purveyors of the most delicious sausage rolls. There is a Sayers café at the rear of Marks and Spencer as well as a large café in St. John's precinct. EATING OUT: Liverpool has a good mix of restaurants, as you'd expect from a city. If you're looking for something classy and expensive (and the glimpse of some football players) take a walk down to Albert Dock (Est Est Est, Blue Bar & Café). For Chinese it has to be Chinatown, which you'll find by walking up to the top of Bold Street. If you like Italian food, I'd highly recommend Villa Romano, a nice little restaurant at the bottom of Wood Street. For Indian try the top of Bold Street. A great place to go if you're with people who like different types of food is Caesar's Palace - they serve a massive range of food and they're not too expensive. SPORT: Liverpool has 2 huge Premiership teams, Liverpool and Everton, as well as not too distant Tranmere Rovers. When you come to Liverpool you're either a blue or red, even if you're only visiting! Take a visit to Anfield, home of the mighty Reds - you can watch a match if they're playing or just take a tour of the stadium (the museum is open daily 10am till 5pm). If you prefer Everton, why not visit Goodison Park, home of the battling Blues. (Goodison is open for tours on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 11 to 2pm) RELIGION: Liverpool is unique in that it has 2 cathedrals - the Catholic, Metropolitan Cathedral o
                        f Christ the King (locally known as Paddy's Wigwam) on Mount Pleasant, near to Liverpool University Student's Union, and at the other end of Hope Street, The Anglican Cathedral, the largest Anglican Cathedral in Europe. Admission is free to both but donations are welcome. Come to Liverpool and see why everyone loves it so much. The only thing is, you won't want to leave.

                        Comments

                        Login or register to add comments
                          More Comments
                        • More +
                          23.11.2001 06:27
                          Very helpful
                          (Rating)
                          11 Comments

                          Advantages

                          Disadvantages

                          As a native of Liverpool, some of you may find my views biased, but I will try not to be. This my town, and I am proud of it. Anyone who can't take pride in where they are from is from a poor place indeed. So, if you want a guide of Liverpool from a Scouser, read on, if not, read the views of someone from outside the city, a woolyback as we would call them. Liverpool is perhaps the most misunderstood and stereotyped city in the United Kingdom. If you are British, I am sure crime, scally's, shell-suits, skinheads, deprivation, little culture, and all other negative thoughts will undoubtedly spring to your mind. If you are not British, perhaps these negatives may appear in your mind, plus a sprinkling of the Beatles and the Titanic. Liverpool indeed has a poor reputation, both nationally, and internationally. This image however is mostly undeserved, and is largely a result of the severe economic and social effects of the militant tendencies which controlled the city council for much of the 1980s. To counter these stereotypes could be difficult for some cities, but for Liverpool, it isn't. What would you say if I told you Liverpool is the safest metropolitan area in England, that Liverpool is the only city, outside of London, in England and Wales which is home to National Museums and Galleries, that Liverpool is the fastest growing city in the UK and that Liverpool consistently sets popular trends in the UK. Well, I would guess, you might choke on your toast. Well, you go ahead and choke, because what I have just said is all true. It is these facts, along with massive economic investment and regeneration, which is helping Liverpool regain its true international standing. During the time of the British Empire, Liverpool was regarded as its second city. Liverpool was a flourishing port and trading centre, and became home to many prosperous merchants. Liverpool, as early as the 1700s, was one of the most multicultural
                          cities in the world. It was part of the flourishing slave trade, and the rich diversity present in that period is still evident today. Liverpool is home to the oldest China Town in Europe, and recently the largest traditional Chinese Arch in the world outside of China was constructed by experts specially brought in from Shanghai in China, one of Liverpool's "twin" cities. Liverpool's prosperity during the 17 and 1800s resulted in the construction of magnificent buildings which today act as monuments to Liverpool's glorious past. St George's Hall is perhaps the most imposing example, widely regarded as one of the finest Neo-Classical buildings in Europe. There are many other buildings which reflect the prosperity Liverpool has enjoyed, such as the town hall, plus many of the buildings in Water Street, and the Arts Quarter, such as the Walker Art Gallery. Any mention of Liverpool's architecture cannot be complete without a mention of the Liver Building, one the three graces on Liverpool's waterfront. Also, further down the waterfront is a five sided clock tower, one of only 2 in the world; why is has 5 sides, you tell me. If you ever take a trip to Liverpool, make sure you take a look at all the buildings, as they are all within a few minutes walk of each other and are easily accessible. This is one of the great advantages of Liverpool, most of the attractions are concentrated in the centre of town, all within easy walking distance. If you fancy a panoramic view of the city, take a trip up St Johns Beacon which reaches up nearly 500ft in to the sky. Local DJ Pete Price calls it a penis in the sky. That is a good analogy, but a better one would be a white elephant. Initially it was built to be an exclusive restaurant, but then it remained empty for some 20 years. Now it is home to a local radio station, but guided tours are available. If you fancy a trip to the suburbs, a trip to Speke Hall is a
                          must. Speke Hall is a Tudor Mansion over 500 years old and really does take you back to the times of Henry VIII, with actors dressed up giving guided tours. There is also Croxteth Hall and Knowsley Hall, which are grand mansions which used to house nobility, now, guided tours are available. There are many guided tours available which take you round the various tourist attractions in Liverpool. As well as the specialist Beatles mystery bus tours, which take you to all things associated with the Beatles, such as Penny Lane, Strawberry Fields, and the homes of George, Paul, John and Ringo, there are many others available. The one I would recommend is the enjoyable duck coach tours. These really are amazing vehicles which take you around the sites in Liverpool. They carry you round the roads of Liverpool, and then, with their amphibious capabilities, they charge in to the water at a terrifying speed. Once in the water, the coach-turned-boat takes you around the Albert Dock and other dockland areas. All very enjoyable. As for arts and culture in Liverpool, there really is a wide variety available. There are many theatres such as the Empire, the Everyman and the Playhouse. There is the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, one of the 5 main regional British orchestras, which give regular performances in the Philharmonic Hall. They also have a summer festival, the "Summer Pops", the largest annual outdoor music festival in Britain. There are many galleries in Liverpool such as the Walker Art Gallery which house fine collections. A trip to the Sudley Art Gallery is recommended. This is out of the city centre, and you are not going to see any Van Gogh or Monet, but it houses some fine local art. Liverpool has many museums such as the Maritime Museum, and, unsurprisingly, illustrates Liverpool's fine history associated with the seas. There is the Museum of Liverpool Life which documents some of Liverpool's darker
                          past association with the slave trade. As for all you Beatles fans, there is the Beatles Museum. It charts the rise of the Beatles, and houses one of John Lennon's old pianos, recently purchased for over £2 million. There are many events which take place in Liverpool. As well as the annual Summer Pops, there is the Matthew Street Festival. dedicated to the Beatles, and for younger boppers, there is Creamfields, hosted by Cream, the biggest superclub in the world. For sporting fans take a trip to Anfield or Goodison Park, home to Liverpool's 2 football teams, Everton and Liverpool. Liverpool is the most successful footballing city in England and guided tours can take you down memory lane. Also, there is the Grand National, an annual horse race. The race is the biggest and most famous steeplechase in the world. The sight of 40 horses jumping over the massive Chair fence is a sight to behold, and certainly worth a look. The nightlife in Liverpool is second to none. Liverpool's clubland is the best in the North of England. There are many bars and cafes, many of which have sprung up in the last few years as Liverpool has constantly promoted the idea of becoming a 24 hour city. An opinion about Liverpool cannot be over until we talk about the people. We can be accused of being too sentimental, and always moaning. Maybe we are, but that is because we care and want to fight for our city. The people are fiercely proud of their dominion, and will defend it till they die. All people in Liverpool have a great sense of humour and have wonderful people skills, so don't be afraid to get to know some of them. If you do come to Liverpool, come for 3 or 4 days, not a week. The attractions available are fantastic, but they will soon be exhausted. You are guaranteed a fun time, so don't stay away. And before you leave for home, make sure you take a ferry ride, you will regret it if you don't. Don't listen to stereotypes, come and make up your own minds!

                          Comments

                          Login or register to add comments
                            More Comments
                          • More +
                            18.11.2001 01:24
                            Very helpful
                            (Rating)
                            6 Comments

                            Advantages

                            Disadvantages

                            • "time has moved on"

                            I am talking about all the things that make Liverpool Great in this Opinion, The accent, the Scousers, the infrastructure and fabric of the City, also I want to centre my thoughts from the perspective of 1950's and 60's. which of course is what liverpool markets itself on today...a musical and seafaring past, its Tourism comes mostly from the hundreds of thousands toursists who visit the City each year who want to see where the Beatles lived, played and grew up.. In this Op I talk from my own childhood perspective and reflect and rely on it greatly, for although I wasn't born in Liverpool I was brought up there from 1956 to 1966, and lived and went to School in Crosby and Childwall (we lived over a shop in the Triangle, just up from the fiveways)....this is a walk down memory lane for me, where life as we saw it was pretty tough and hard in those times, and there are many folk. older than I who would say that their times were even harder.. ~~~ o0o ~~~ I was lucky as a kid, (I suppose) I saw Liverpool in all its grandeur ( well almost) its seafaring community was just starting to lose work, docks were just beginning to close, and Camelairds across the water were just begining to lose ship building orders and redundancies were on the cards..but the City of Liverpool was built around the sea and the River Mersey, Shipping in one form or another was its life blood, and anyone respectable was connected to the sea or had an uncle or distant relative who was a sailor, or a merchant.. We had Ferries Sailing to the Isle of Man, Dublin and Belfast, local ferries to Birkenhead, Wallasey and New Brighton Pier..we had TV companies making programs such as Z Cars, sotley softley, The Liverbirds and Documentaries on the way of life were abundant, sadly the dockworkers strikes contributed to the death of shipping (as they knew shipping then) in Liverpool, but also contrubuted to the humour and culture in Liverpool.. ~~~ o
                            0o0o ~~~ I remember the very first ever passenger hovercraft service starting on the Mersey..it went from Wallasey Beach to Rhyll in North Wales and started about 1962/3..also recall watching the big ships leaving the docks full of passengers The Empress of England and the Empress of Canada with their huge chequered funnels were frequent visitors to the Mersey Docks, the annual primary School outing was a trip on the Egremont, Royal Iris or Daffodil from the Pier Head up the Manchester Ship Canal to Salford where we were taken to the Fun Fair and Circus at Belle Vue Park and then ferried back to Liverpool in a fleet of Liverpool Corporation Buses... The Liver buildings with the famous Liverbird on top overshadowed the River, Pier Head, Floating Stage ( where the Isle of Man ferry left from) and the old bus Station where buses used to park around the Monuments and Statues, I remember watching the great fire at Hendersons Store in Church Street. meeting friends outside the Tatler or under the (rude) Statue at John lewis's, The Adelphi hotel ( yes the one featured in the fly on the wall documentary) was the poshest Hotel in liverpool, Skelhorn Street bus station ( with its two depature levels), and Lime Street station when you could drive into it in your car or taxi, not forgetting the two ( now defunct) other Railway Stations Exchange ( for departures to Kirby, Carlisle and Scotland and Central station (For departures to Warrington and Manchester Central now the Gmex centre), and what self respecting Liverpool boy worth his salt could forget the Wizzards Den magic and trick shop near the Exchange station..Blacklers Department Store and the special birthday teas to be had at Reeces Cafe... I remember a Scotland Road ( Scottie rd) where the Police were frightened to go down unless they were in threes, I also remember Park Police riding around on Scooters in Sefton Park... ~~~ o0o0o ~~~ The Mersey Tunnels seem to take you
                            to the other side of the world as a kid and were always the beginning of a day out to Chester Zoo for us, and what about the Theatres and Cinemas lots of them, with all sorts of things being show or going on..even the Cathedral (C of E) hosted the annual Spinners concerts, and the bombed out church..a constant reminder of the war..I watched the new R.C. Cathedral being built ( at the time it looked like an appolo space capsule), Liverpool people loved to talk to strangers and find out about you, there were no other motives, we loved to play about, tell stories, jokes, act, sing, dance, if we didn;t have any money for guitars or other instruments we'd improvise, washboards, upturned pans etc... we'd make our own music..the advent of Skiffle... The group of the 60's were influenced by Skiffle, Rock and Roll coming in from the States, Buddy Holly, Elvis..all huge influences on The Beatles, and other local Bands ( Four Pennies, Mersey Beats, Gerry & the Pacemakers and a host of others), who in turn made the local places famous, because they wrote about them,( Ferry 'cross the Mersey,,Gerry & The Pacemakers) Penny Lane ( I lived near here) Strawbery Fields ( The Slavation Army Home for Kids, I had a couple of friends who went there)..Liverpool Airport ( I remember seeing the Beatles Land here on their way back from the USA) if I had passed my 11+ I would have gone to Quarry Bank School where John Lennon and Paul McCartney went... ~~~ o0o0o ~~~ Liverpool isn't just a Tourist Attraction it is an instituation, full of special folk, with a superb sense of humour, and a very special culture and way of life, its history of the sea has brought a diverse back ground of cultures and it has always been affectionately called the capital of Ireland, having strong links with both the north and south of the Island...I remember the annual Scout camp on the Isle of Man, we used to hope that we'd go over on the new ferry (Manx Maid) b
                            ut more often than not it was the older Kig Orry, or Maid of Man... The fabric of the City has changed considerably since the 1960's, and yet much of the old City can still be seen, the Museums, St Georges Hall, Lime Street, The Pier Head...and it has blended with the New stuff quite well.... Liverpool will always be a welcoming and homely City, with its special atmosphere and culture....everyone should visit Liverpool at least once in their lives, stand at the Pierhead and watch the River go by, absorb the history of the City, breathe its air....There is for me no other City in the world like Liverpool...and the Football...well thats a story for someone else to tell..but suffice for me to say I have been a Liverpool supporter since 1957......sorry to any Toffees !! ~~~ o0o0o ~~~ Liverpool had its black side and there are lots of Ghost stories and mysteries that surround Liverpool, The Sightings of Spring Heeled Jack in the City and also at an Everton Game, Brownlow Hill Bookshop ( reputedly the most haunted shop in England) and the spook at Woolton Docks or the Ghost of the old Woolton swimming baths, also its more modern Black History was that Liverpool or more notably Walton Gaol was the place of the last Hanging in the UK in 1964 ( I actually remember this event) I was 12 at the time, actually to be accurate it was a last ' simultaneous hanging' because at the same time, on the same day at Strangeways Prison in Manchester a partner in the same crime was hung.... so in actual fact not one person can claim to be the last person ever to Hang in the United Kingdom..

                            Comments

                            Login or register to add comments
                            • More +
                              14.07.2001 03:20
                              Very helpful
                              (Rating)
                              4 Comments

                              Advantages

                              Disadvantages

                              What comes into your head when you think of Liverpool? Chances are, you have never been to what Charles Dickens described as “That rich and beautiful port”. But I find that even still, complete strangers to the city think of unemployment, firebombs, riots, poverty, crime and bad council. The famous Liverpool riots were reported by the press in the 80s, with Liverpool seen as the lowest of the low; a real no-go area. But I challenge anyone to walk down Church Street up to the Pier Head, and just look around, breath in the fresh air, have a good laugh with the sharp wit what is a scouser, and to look at the fastest developing city in Europe. The shops, the culture, the activities on offer and facilities the new council provides. You will see the real Liverpool, not the medias view, as the city really is, warts and all. Liverpool: the fabulous place, the wonderful people. ***** Liverpool-the fifth largest city in the U.K-is a Northwestern city, standing on the famous River Mersey. As well as being the main administrative city for the county Merseyside, it is the most important port outside London for England. Not many buildings in Liverpool predate the 1800s, but the town hall is a notable exception. Built in 1754 and rebuilt in 1795, it is one of the main attractions for the city. Other famous Liverpool buildings include St. George’s Hall (built 1854), the Phillomonic Hall (art deco style, world famous concert hall), the Elizabethan Law Courts, and of course the two cathedrals. There are more Georgian terraces in Liverpool than in Bath, and more listed buildings than anywhere except London. Most of the most famous buildings are open to the public, including St. George’s Hall, in the heart of the city. Here, in Court no. 1 with the uncomfortable benches and the imposing room is stage to Trail and Jury in various. Tours are on offer at peak times, with a rare glimpse at the mosaic floor that is so special
                              it is covered up all the time but special occasions. Look around when you’re doing the shopping – some of the buildings are amazing. Bold Street with it’s mix of alternative shops is a real mix match of different buildings; a really fun place to shop. And it takes you mind off the credit card bill… The city also boasts some of the best cultural institutions. The most famous probably being the Tate Liverpool. The Tate houses the largest collection of modern art outside London in the U.K, and is world famous for it’s many exhibitions. As mentioned above, the Phillomonic Hall is an art deco concert hall, home to The Royal Liverpool Phillomonic Orchestra. It has been stage to many stars in the music business and was granted £10 million in the 1900sfrom the Arts Council. It used this money to improve the structure of the building, sound proof the hall, build a new extended stage and new dressing room facilities for members of the orchestra. More recently, it has received £2.5 million to clear its debts. Liverpool offers a large library network, the central office being William Brown Street Central Library (1852). Here, open to everyone, there are thousands of books, pcs, videos ect. in the fabulous 18th century building. Theatres are most certainly in demand in Liverpool, with many specialist playhouses. Many of the old theatres are being re-furbished, and the Empire (probably the most famous and popular) thriving with West End musicals, and pop concerts thanks to the newly extended stage. Just don’t look down if you’re in the grand circle… And with some of the most museums the country (ranging from one devoted entirely to smugglers and the famous Speke Hall, the countryside in the city, with the Tudor hall run by the National Trust), Liverpool is definitely bursting at the seams with culture. Even more culture can be found in China Town (with the largest Chinese ark outside of China), the Albert Dock with itR
                              17;s alternative boutiques and views, plus of course Fred’s weather map), the famous Liver Building and Liver Birds, and the Mersey Ferries running every half hour, Liverpool with it’s millions of pounds of investment is the place to be seen. Shopping is taken very seriously in Liverpool, with miles of streets devoted to retail therapy. Next, Gap, Marks and Sparks, BHS and Littlewoods have all refurbished their stores, to make it a great alternative to Manchester. Alternative shops are also in high demand, with little tucked away boutiques the home of many unique home and personal ideas. Transport’s great, with the newly refurbished Lime Street the heart of the city’s rail network, also with a great bus and underground service. Trains run to near-by Southport and St. Helens regularly. The City of Liverpool has always been famous for sport, with two of the best football clubs in the tables, with the grounds offering full museums and tours. Many sports complexes offering up-to-the-second equipment are on offer to travellers and residents alike. And so you see, Liverpool is well back on it's feet. The city isn't perfect, but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I haven't even been able to write enough to give you even a tiny idea of what the city is like, so visit Liverpool, or you haven't lived.

                              Comments

                              Login or register to add comments
                              • More +
                                04.06.2001 01:16
                                Very helpful
                                (Rating)
                                6 Comments

                                Advantages

                                Disadvantages

                                I have always wanted to go to New York. To travel on the Staten Island ferry, visit the big department stores, museums and restaurants, use the subway, etc. However, I live only 15 miles from Liverpool and never use their ferries, subways or stores! So when my parents suggested a day out on the Liverpool ferries I was not overly enthusiastic - hardly New York! Boy was I wrong. The splendour of Liverpool's architecture and waterfront is mindblowing. It's bars and restaurants are on a par with any International city. We parked at a local train station that was within Merseyside. This was apparently important. My parents have both recently reached the age when travel is free within Merseyside and they are now experts at where you can and can't go and at what times. They advised us to buy a Saver ticket - this means free travel on all trains, buses and ferries in the Merseyside area (and Merseyside is a big area). Two adults Saver tickets cost just £5.60, I was pleased with that. After all, if you are going to have a naff day out, you don't want to pay a fortune for it. The train, amazingly, was on time and deposited us in the centre of Liverpool. As this was on a Sunday afternoon, I was surprised at the amount of people about in the subways. I was also surprised that the people were mostly families - no gangs, no druggies or drunks. The train stations were littered and splattered with graffiti, of course, but the staff were friendly and helpful, which made up for the lack of aesthetics. We walked the short distance downhill through the city centre to the Pier Head to catch the ferry. The walk was interesting - past marvellous architecture and inviting pubs and wine bars, and even a Starbucks. The train had been nicely timed to arrive just a fraction too late to catch the midday ferry. However, as we were getting our tickets, the lady called a uniformed young man over and told him we were trying to catch
                                the midday ferry. He radioed ahead and we rushed through the tunnel. We were embarrassed to realise that everyone on the ferry was watching and waiting for us. Another uniformed man gallantly helped us on and the ferry took off. As the daughter of a retired sea-going engineer, I am ashamed to say that I have no sea-legs. We went upstairs to the upper saloon and I caught a glimpse through a window of things outside moving in a lurching fashion. And there went my stomach. The saloon was plush and comfortable with a well-stocked bar. I sat down and waited for my stomach to join me. My dad regaled me with stories of colleagues who never recovered from sea-sickness, which made me feel less guilty but more depressed. However, within 10 minutes I was fine. No-one else on board seemed to be suffering and it was a calm day, so it was just me - Dad says it is an inner ear problem. We got off at Seacombe on the Wirral peninsula. The terminal there was busy. It had a children's play area and an aquarium (both chargeable). We went through to the bus stop outside and waited. And waited. Another good example of buses and trains doing their best to avoid each other. Actually it was probably only 10 minutes, it just felt longer. We took a double decker bus to New Brighton and sat upstairs - which is the best place for nosy people, you can see in all the gardens you pass. The ride was free again, as our Saver tickets covered this journey as well. New Brighton was a favourite seaside resort in it's day. It had a pier, amusements, an outdoor baths and all the things you would expect. It has declined seriously over the years and I fully expected it to be boarded-up and broken down. We got off the bus outside a large hotel with grand, sweeping grounds. The road was massive, wide and long, running the length of athe prom. The prom wall looked new and impressive. We walked past an amusement arcade (open), indoor carting area (open) and cafes
                                (open). I was pleasantly surprised. This was no ghost town. It was full of happy Sunday revellers - mostly families again. The smell of the chips was a little nauseating, but people seemed to be enjoying them. We had our picnic on the front in a charming Victorian shelter with all its windows intact (amazing!), and watched children fishing for crabs. They caught plenty and threw them all back, which was nice. Boats were coming and going - little pilot boats taking pilots and crew out to Anglesey for the Irish runs; a huge car ferry which took an hour to maneuver out of the dock; smaller tugs and tankers. After wasting some time in the amusement arcade (why do they have to be so NOISY?), we strolled back to the bus stop. Learning from the timetable that we had a 20-minute wait, we decided to walk up to an RNLI station nearby. This turned out to be a very good idea. It was open and the boats were in, so we were treated to a talk by an RNLI crewman.The RNLI is the organisation that is called out when there is a shipping emergency. Anything from a man overboard to a large-scale disaster, these are the guys they call on. The crewman took great pride in his job and thoroughly enjoyed showing us around. They have between 50 and 60 callouts a year, which makes them a busy station. They are crewed almost entirely by local volunteers - all male. Their pictures were displayed, together with their occupations. A lot of them were schoolteachers and policemen. They all looked muscular and capable. It made me want to buy a little dingy and look helpless. We made it back to the bus stop just in time for the ride back to the ferry and were also just in time for that leaving. The journey back was so enjoyable that I wanted to stay on for another round trip. It took us past the Albert Dock and the famous buildings on the waterfront : Customs House, Cunard Buidling and the Liver Buildings. When we got off, I decided to hunt around for the Titanic Memorial.
                                This was dedicated to the engineers who died on the Titanic but there is nothing on it to say that. Apparently they didn't want to upset wealthy passengers leaving on big liners with a memorial to remind them that the sea can claim lives. So the Titanic Memorial doesn't mention the Titanic! I found it, it is beautiful. It is rather like a church spire, surrounded by statues and topped by a gold peak. Tired by now, the walk back seemed a long drag. It was uphill and we all agreed that they must have moved the train station while we were on the ferry. We had a short wait for our train, but passed the time pleasantly enough. There were excellent displays showing how long the next trains would be - we checked each one and they were accurate. How technology has improved public transport! We also did a bit of rat spotting. Good clean family fun. On the journey back we were joined by a few fare dodgers. These were young teenagers who kept swopping carriages when the inspector arrived. Harmless enough, and they kept us amused. To end the day perfectly, our cars were still there in the car park, with all their wheels on. Now you wouldn't get that in New York!

                                Comments

                                Login or register to add comments
                                • More +
                                  08.05.2001 07:55
                                  Very helpful
                                  (Rating)
                                  1 Comment

                                  Advantages

                                  Disadvantages

                                  I love Liverpool. It's probabley because I was born there. I don't live in Liverpool now. I am Chester which is not too far away. Liverpool has great nightlife. The people are so friendly. Now and again there are a few incidents but, no more than other major cities. In fact, I live in Chester now and have seen more incidents here in 6 years than In ever saw in Liverpool. I hate the label it gets from the media it's so unfair. Have you ever noticed on tele if there is a villian on "The Bill", or any other similar programme he is alwyas a scouser! The scouser can't be the hero or the bank manager, why not? because the media have portrayed it as a terrible place full of villans. I once was in London for the day. Someone I was with (he was Italian) was meeting someone from a company in London. He said that he was living in Liverpool. The response he got was "Oh dear, aren't you scared" I told him I was from Liverpool and asked where he had visited to be able to justify such a comment. His response was "OH, I HAVE NEVER BEEN THERE" I just read in the paper, it was bad. Then he said, "well you lot started all the riots" I couldn't believe what I was hearing. I reminded him that the riots started in Brixton not Liverpool. He said "oh yes" and then apologised. I told him to keep his apology as there is one thing I hate is two faced people and that he could never live in such a nice place being so narrowminded as he was. I have friend here from Hertfordshire who went to uni in Liverpool. She said when she got her place all her friend were saying she would have to carry a gun etc. She said she had a better time than any off her other friends and was so glad she went to uni there. She still keeps in touch with the peolpe she met and said they were the nicest friendliest people she has ever met. So before you pass judgement on a place you have never visited. Go to LIverpool and
                                  see for yourself. I promise you. You won't be disappointed and I am certain you'll love it!

                                  Comments

                                  Login or register to add comments