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  • A clever brand
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    194 Reviews
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      14.07.2014 21:50
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      Is marmite your mate?

      Marmite, you either love it or you hate it. My mate marmite! Marmite has got to be one of the most distinctive brands ever. So much so you never see any other similar alternatives or shop own brands. You would imagine that the product would not be too hard for companies to get close to imitate but for marmite lovers I doubt they could be persuaded away fro such San incredibly trusted brand. If you love marmite or hate it you always know exactly what to expect from a jar or marmite! The company is very clever and has built such a strong brand, at Christmas time in all giftware shops you now always see marmite branded gifts such as lunch boxes, plates and cups. Surly if marmite lovers have a marmite plate this will encourage them to East more marmite, very clever! Personally I am not a massive Marmite fan. I will occasionally have marmite on crunchy items such as toast and crackers. My husband on the other hand would happily have marmite on anything - he is a true marmite lover bad would consider marmite his mate. My husband who is a chef has a top tip of mixing marmite with oil and then pouring it onto you roast potatoes before putting them in the oven for cooking. He also suggests having marmite on toast with a glass of milk for nice contrasting flavours. Marmite is available pretty much everywhere. It''s in all of the supermarkets and even in most little local shops. It always seems surprisingly expensive in a shop but it is just a couple of pounds.

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      23.05.2014 14:39
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      • Lovely!!
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      My best mate - marmite

      Marmite is the best spread in the world! Forget jam or peanut butter, Marmite is the way to go! I can honestly say that I have Marmite almost every day. I love it on toast, in sandwiches, on rice cakes, ryvitas etc. It is also fantastic with cheese. Spread it in a toasted cheese sandwich and it is heaven. Every day for my lunch at work I have plain rice cakes with cheese spread and Marmite. The best way to buy it is in the squeezable jars, but make sure you do not waste what is left when it can not be squeezed any more - you have to take the lid off and extract the remaining Marmite with a knife. Do not waste any! It is precious! But, by far my favourite way of having Marmite is on a toasted crumpet with butter. The only slight downside to Marmite (if there has to be one) is that it is a bit sticky if you get it on your fingers - but do not despair and do not let this put you off - you can easily just go and wash your hands, or have a baby wipe to hand.

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      01.10.2012 14:27
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      A great tasting product

      ==Marmite==

      Firstly, you all know the classic saying attached to this product you either love it or you hate it, I have to say its love all the way for me! I can understand how some people can hate it though as it is a very strong tasting product. Marmite has been in production in Burton on Trent since 1902 so it therefore shows that perhaps there are more lovers of Marmite then there are haters! The product has been altered throughout the decades to create the product that is on today's market. The actual process of making Marmite has only been changed slightly over the years. Marmite is made after a brewer has finished with the yeast used in the fermentation process used in creating ale, they further process this by-product which the creates a yeast paste to which further ingredients are added (spice extracts, vitamins and vegetable extracts) when these are added they are processed further and finally we have the end product, Marmite. One of the vitamins added to Marmite is Vitamin B this is essential for assisting the regulation of the kidneys, liver and nervous system and also it helps boost natural energy levels, therefore get spreading! Marmite has made an impact in the military over the years when it was added to soldiers' ration packs during both world wars and has more recently been sent to Kosovo peace keeping missions as a morale booster for British troops.

      ==Packaging==

      Marmite got its name from a French casserole dish also named "marmite," this French dish is the image which features on all of the Marmite labels in product today. The branding and packaging has hardly changed since it first hit British shelves. Today the product comes in a glass jar with the iconic yellow lid and the predominately yellow label. The product can easily be spotted on supermarket shelves and you do not need to see the label to be able to associate the packaging with the product in which is contained inside it. Marmite is more than just a food product it has become a well-known British brand with merchandise with the marmite logo being found in many kitchens across the country. Just some of the merchandise available is a toast rack, teapot, mugs, coasters and other kitchen items. Marmite can be purchased in either the glass jar (125g, 250g, 500g) or the new squeezy bottle (200g and 400g). I have only had the glass jars of marmite, the jar is wide enough to allow you to extract the entire product out of the jar, so there is no wastage when you get to the bottom. The lid screws on and keeps the product nice and fresh. Do not refrigerate this product I have made this mistake before and the Marmite becomes near impossible to spread, it is recommended that you store in a cool, dry place ideally in your kitchen cupboard or pantry if you are of the higher class!

      ==Taste==

      The flavour of Marmite is very distinctive and strong, this is why they say you either love it or you hate it you rarely find people who are in the middle with this product. The taste of the product is very unique and that is what I like about this particular product. It can be used in cooking to add flavours to ordinary tasting foods. I personally enjoy marmite on thick white toast the best, it's the simple things in life which are the most appealing! However, I also use marmite on my roast potatoes it helps give them a nice golden colour, a crisp skin and a delicious taste much better than ordinary roasties. What I do is I boil the potatoes for roughly 7 minutes until they begin to soften, while they are boiling I preheat the oven to gas mark 8 and I place a cooking tray with cooking oil on the top shelf for the time in which I am boiling the potatoes (should be chopped into good sizes). I then remove the potatoes off the heat, drain and then place the lid on the pan and shake the potatoes in the pan to get a bit of a "battered look" on them, it helps create softer middles in the roast potatoes, I then add a good tablespoon of marmite (for a portion of 2) and mix until each potato is evenly coated. Then you remove the tray from the oven with the hot oil (be careful) and you place each potato in the tray and ensure they have an even covering of oil then bake at gas mark 8 for 45 minutes or until soft in the middle. Delicious! Other ways in which I enjoy marmite is in a cheese sandwich. More ways in which you can use Marmite can be found on the Marmite website (www.marmite.com) or in the various Marmite cook books available online or in many good book stores.

      ==Nutritional value==

      Like I have stated earlier in the review, Marmite contains an essential vitamin (B), the product is also low in salt and is 100% vegetarian so it can be enjoyed by all and those of you calorie counters you needn't worry as this is a nice low fat product! (Not like that matters to me!)Marmite also contains Thiamin and Riboflavin which help the body make the most of nutrients in food and help them carry out their roles. Niacin can also be found in this product and this aids the cells in our body to function properly. Finally, for all you expectant mothers or those trying to conceive this product contains the needed folic acid, folic acid is essential in pregnancy as it helps the development of the foetus's spinal cord and helps your heart and blood supply. Who would have thought all this from a product you spread on your toast! The ingredients found in Marmite are as followed:

      Yeast Extract
      Salt
      Vegetable Extract
      Niacin
      Thiamin
      Spice Extracts
      Riboflavin
      Folic Acid
      Celery Extract
      Vitamin B12

      ==Other marmite products on today's market==

      There are many other food products on today's supermarket shelves, my favourite being Marmite flavoured cheddar which can be purchased in individually packaging sticks or round bells (similar to the look of the well-known Babybel) and some supermarkets have it on their deli counters and can be purchased in suitably sized blocks. Another product would be the limited edition Marmite walkers crisps, personally I am not a fan of these the taste doesn't represent Marmite brilliantly and they are extremely salty. Again the other products do not do Marmite justice such as the Marmite cereal bars (what were they thinking!?!) and the Marmite rice cakes! I have also seen Marmite breadsticks on supermarket shelves but I have not tried these yet so I cannot comment on their taste.

      ==Price courtesy of mysupermarket.co.uk (1/10/2012)==

      Marmite 125g glass jar:
      Asda, Waitrose, Ocado: £1.20
      Sainsbury's, Tesco: £1.70

      Marmite 250g glass jar:
      Tesco, Waitrose, Sainsbury's, Ocado: £2.69
      Asda £2.00

      Marmite 500g glass jar:
      Asda: £4.00
      Tesco, Waitrose, Sainsbury's and Ocado; £4.49

      Review also on Ciao under the same username.

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        16.08.2012 10:11
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        A very odd, and delicious, and disgusting spread. Try some and see what I mean!

        Okay, so for those who don't know: Marmite is some kind of (what other kinds, other than 'some' are there?) spread, a cousin of Jam perhaps... that you may spread on your toast or... well, you may spread it anywhere; I'd recommend it for food stuffs though.

        == Love it or Hate It? ==

        Marmite are famous for branding their product with this slogan/philosophy (okay maybe the word "philosophy" is a little overblown haha) implying that its taste is divisive and people will either LOVE it, or HATE it.

        I quite admire this as a marketing concept in the sense... Marmite aren't trying to win everybody, and that's quite interesting, for a major brand product. Most brands would at least like to pretend that almost everybody will love their product. Why wouldn't they? they want as many people to try, or hear of, or think they may love X product.

        Marmite however, in their opening sentiment to you as a product... emphasize that you may hate their product. Which, is almost a little provocative too, which is why it's quite clever. As, people will often love or hate almost everything, and people will also be on the fence about almost everything, there isn't this clear dividing line, but all camps will always exist. But making it a statement and part of your brand, as if almost to tempt people in to finding out which... is a nice idea.

        Whilst they (not sure who they is? the 'Marmite family' perhaps?) were probably fully conscious of the message and the fact it's not LITERALLY true, and were simply using it as a somewhat provocativeidea; I disagree with it.

        The only reason I'm stating I disagree with it, after stating I know it's probably not meant to be taken literally is because; I actually both love AND hate Marmite. So I felt my personal perception of its taste to me qualified that otherwise verbose analysis!

        Yes, I love AND hate Marmite. Its taste is certainly unique and when I eat it on my toast I think "that's delicious" and "that's disgusting" at the same time. This almost makes me feel more in-tune as to how they arrived at their marketing message... the taste is almost confusing and not definitively nice or bad, it's unique and weird, so they probably exploit that conceptually.

        == Would I Recommend You Try It? ==

        Sure, why not!

        You only live once and you won't be trying any Marmite when you're six feet under (ooh, heavy for a review of Marmite, no?), so why not have a taste now?

        I can't tell you whether you'll probably like it or not, as that's totally subjective, and Marmite is an inherently and I think mostly agreed: universally odd taste to most people. But you'll certainly not forget it soon, and it may just become your new favourite s... spre, spready, stuff!

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          06.08.2012 20:27
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          A life-long mate if you give it more than one chance

          ..But this wasn't always the case. When I first tried Marmite spread at the tender age of 14- I remember it well because it was the year my sister went vegetarian, which is why she started eating it initially- I spat the piece of toast covered in marmite out and said 'never again'. Then several years later I met my husband who is such a marmite fanatic that he drinks 'the dregs' by adding hot water to the near-empty jar and drinking it like a tea. He calls this concoction a 'Movril' and looks forward to the jar emptying so that he can indulge in it.

          I used to hate it. Whenever he had a Movril, I had to leave the room because I couldn't stand the smell- it got to me that much. Also I have never been a fan of salty foods and Marmite is very salty-tasting, and quite high in salt too.

          So what happened to make Marmite a life-long friend? I got pregnant. I never had any strange cravings, only normal things like fruit and orange juice.. Until my husband made a Movril and I smelled it from in the bath! I demanded a sip and downed the whole thing. Because it had a strong flavour? Because it is packed full of vitamins? Because my unborn baby daughter thought it would be funny? Who knows. But I found that it also helped with my horrible 'morning' sickness which I had all day long, again maybe because it is so high in B vitamins, but I don't really know.

          Before I found my love of Marmite I hated the strange gooey tar-like consistency of Marmite. But since the trial at 14 I had started enjoying thick fruit spreads which are really not that different in consistency and colour, so the transition to Marmite was made smooth by this over the years, I think. There is actually something quite satisfying about how dark thick it is, to me- it feels nourishing, in a way. Also my sister put a huge dollop on my toast when I first tried it, which was a mean trick as you really only need to eat it in small quantities, spread thinly on toast for example. Because of this Marmite spreads very far and the price is fantastic for the nutritional value and also the ease of using it when you are hungry for a quick but healthy snack. A small 125g jar will cost you £1.35 in Asda at the moment, a medium-size 250g jar £2, and a large 500g jar £4. We usually get the large jar and it lasts several months despite the fact that we both eat it like mad Marmite-addicted monsters.

          The jars are also made of glass which means no horrid chemicals from plastic eg BPA and pthalates in your Marmite, and the jars can be easily recycled too.

          I am looking forward to giving my daughter the Marmite trial when she is older- it is still too salty for such a little girl at present. In the meantime the question on my lipsremains, without a doubt, 'will it be her mate?' It certainly is mine.

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            31.07.2012 15:02
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            A dfiverse spread that you either love or hate.

            To kick off this review of Marmite I would like to state that I am a 'lover' not a 'hater'. The advertisements for Marmite are famously known for their 'Love' or 'Hate' it themes, which makes Marmite rather unique just by the fact that it is a risky campaign to take on when you promote your product as being hated by half of its consumers. This has famously become known as 'The Marmite Effect' or reaction.

            Thankfully it is one of the English products that are sold in most Dutch supermarkets and I can get it quite easily, albeit at a higher price than it would be in England.

            Marmite is a savoury spread that is made from yeast extract. The taste is so unique and distinctive that it is hard to put it into a category or, indeed, compare it to anything else. It has a sharp, tangy taste that has a real kick, especially if you spread it on quite thick. The taste is sort of like Bovril with added salt and it has a malty taste to it. It contains B vitamins B1, B2 and B12 and also folic acid. It is vegetarian and contains no animal fats whatsoever. Marmite is also really light and contains no salt, apart from sodium chloride in trace and only a trace of sugar, which does not convey to the taste as it is not sweet at all. Each 125g jar contains about three and a half grams of fibre; so with the vitamins as well it is quite a healthy snack or treat to have.,
            I like to spread it on toast and I must admit I do like to spread on more than the recommended four gram serving. It's great in the morning with a cup of tea. I also love it on cheese sandwiches, which I don't eat that often due to the fat content of the cheese. It is also really nice on wholemeal crackers to make a lovely healthy snack. One of my favourite lunch time snacks is beans on toast and adding marmite to the toast first or adding a spoon to my baked beans makes for a real treat.

            You can use Marmite in a variety of meals and it is excellent to add to sauces, casseroles or gravy.
            It is quite unusual that I like the salty taste so much as I don't eat salt.

            The jars are easily recognisable and come in 125, 250 and 500g sizes. The glass is brown and egg-shaped (if the egg was on its side) and is emblazoned with the famous Marmite branded sticker in yellow, green and red and the distinctive round, ridged, yellow screw-on top. The word 'Marmite' is actually French and relates to the earthenware pot that Marmite was produced in. These pots later became metal and the design of the glass jars that Marmite comes in is based on the shape of these pots.

            Marmite is really popular in New Zealand and has been for almost one hundred years. You may have also heard of the Australian version 'Vegemite', which is also very popular. The French obviously have their own version and The Swedish have 'Cenovis', the Germans 'Vitam-R'. So Marmite is not as traditionally English as many of you might have thought.

            Marmite also comes in a squeezy bottle version and this is favoured by many as it is easier to just splodge a bit out of the bottle and is runnier so easier to spread. It can be a little irritating getting the last of your Marmite out of the glass jars with a knife. It is a good idea to use a tea spoon for this purpose.

            Marmite is also available as a flavour in many foods and alternative snacks. One of my favourites is 'Marmite Mini Cheddars'. I could just lick of the salty flavouring all day long. You can get Marmite flavoured cheese, nuts and cashews, bread sticks, chocolate and all manner of strange combinations. I say strange because to most people it probably is, mainly the 'Haters', but I love Marmite and I am open to trying any manner of new variations.

            Marmite was founded by Justus Von Liebig who stumbled upon the art of extracting yeast in the beer making process and realised that once salt was added to it, it actually tasted quite unusual. Good job he wasn't a 'Hater' or we may never have had Marmite in our shops. The recipe remains a secret so he had to live up to his surname in order to keep it that way. In nineteen hundred and two the Marmite Food Extract Company was established in Burton-on-Trent in Staffordshire not far away from where I lived before I moved to The Netherlands.

            The food was so popular as a health food that six years after it was first made, the Australians and New Zealanders began to produce it themselves. They can't quite get that original Marmite taste though and their version varies with the adding of sugar and caramel extract. I have tried vegemite and there is not much difference with it compared to Marmite but you can tell there is something missing.

            I love Marmite and I don't mind paying a little bit extra to have it in Holland. It is a very different spread to try and if you haven't then you should. I think if you hate it then you really do hate it but if you're a lover such as I, then it really is a very tantalising and diverse food jar to have in your cupboard.


            ©Lee Billingham

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              24.07.2012 22:38
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              Unfortunately, I dislike the taste too much to give it anything other than a 1 star rating.

              Marmite is one of those things that is described as a spread that you either love a lot or you hate a lot (not an in between thing, where you like it or dislike it a little bit). The brand is actually quite popular, even though it does state quite clearly that is is a yeast extract (which I know does sound quite disgusting), from those of you who absolutely love the spread and continually go to the shops to buy some more.

              I had not known whether I was a "lover" or whether I was a "hater" of Marmite until quite recently, as I had been scared off by several of my friends telling me statements such as "It is absolutely terrible! Don't bother trying it out, unless you want to make yourself sick or something." As you can probably tell, this is not the most optimistic of descriptions. This, together with many other similar comments about Marmite, was enough to prevent me from sampling the product and finding out for myself for quite a while.

              When out shopping recently, however, I decided that the time had come for me to try Marmite for the first time. From Tesco, I bought an 125g jar for £1, though they were available in different sizes, and thus different prices (for example, a 500g jar is £4.50). Marmite is not the cheapest of spreads; 125g is not a lot for £1, and you could get a variety of different spreads for less money. For those keen fans of Marmite, though, this probably does not seem like such a bad price to pay.

              The jar is rounded and made of glass, with a yellow lid which can easily be screwed on and off. The design of the Marmite sticker is not what I would call attractive; however, with its rather violent choice of colour, it does manage to pull off a rather retro and strange effect.

              The spread itself does look pretty vile, and that, along with the strong smell, would have been enough to put me off even trying the whole product altogether, had I not convinced myself that appearances are not everything there is to a product. It is a dark brown coloured paste which is a little sludgy and sticky. To be honest, it greatly resembles someone's dinner which has come out the wrong way, only more mushed up and darker.

              It was quite easy to spread onto a piece of toast using a butter knife, though this didn't make it look any more attractive than it did inside the jar.

              The flavour I can now describe as... absolutely disgusting. It tastes strong, bitter and too salty, leaving you with a very unpleasant aftertaste. I doubt I will be trying this Marmite spread again anytime soon... or ever. At the moment, it is being held captive at the back of my kitchen cupboard, and it is very likely to go to waste. However, I do understand that there are plenty of people who absolutely adore this product, so I would recommend for you to give it a taste before judging it completely, as everyone has different tastes!

              The brand itself seems to be growing more and more popular; I have seen various Marmite related merchandise items floating around in the market, for example money jars, keyrings and cuff links; I do agree that they can be quite a nice thing to own and would look interesting displayed. However, because of my absolute dislike of the taste, I doubt that I will be investing in any of these Marmite related items any time soon.

              Only one star from me, as I am obviously not a big fan of this product, however, I do understand that there are many of you out there who adore this product. It is worth a try, but you, like me, may end up regretting it. They are very right; you either love it or hate it.

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                16.05.2012 14:53
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                One of my favourite flavours, love adding it to everything

                I have always loved Marmite as a sandwich filling or on toast, but recently I've begun finding other ways of sneaking it into various meals.

                In case anyone doesn't know, Marmite is a brown sticky sandwich spread which has a very distinct and strong taste. It is made from yeast extract and is a nutritious product containing Vitamin B and Folic Acid but not a lot of fat or calories.

                Due to Marmite's strong flavour only a small amount is needed to add sufficient Marmitey-ness to a meal or sandwich. The Marmite makers recommend 4g as a serving, which is basically just dipping your knife in the jar. Its strong flavour has also led to the product being marketed with the slogan 'Love it or Hate it.' Judging by what people say, opinions on this seem to be split about 50/50 between 'love' and 'hate.'

                The taste of Marmite is extremely difficult to describe, I'm sure most people will have tasted it though. All I can say is that it is definitely a savoury taste, it's not sweet in the slightest, and it's also quite salty. But really it does just have its own flavour that I can't compare to anything else. Apart from Twiglets. Yes if you like Twiglets you're bound to like Marmite, as the flavoured coating on Twiglets is made from yeast extract also. The texture of marmite is a smooth, thick, quite sticky substance, kind of like golden syrup but not quite as thick.

                Marmite usually comes in glass jars, but there are also squeezy plastic bottles which contain slightly runnier Marmite than the jars do. The jars are brown with a yellow lid and label and still have a really old fashioned look to them as the packaging hasn't changed much over the years. I've only ever had the glass jars and they come in various sizes; 125g, 250g & 500g. These vary in price, last time I bought Marmite I stocked up on a few jars as the 125g size was on offer for £1 in Asda. Usually the 125g one is about £1.50, the 250g is around £3 and the large 500g jar can be getting on for a fiver. Special edition jars are often on sale, for example the current one features a union jack and Marmite is spelt 'Ma'amite' in order to celebrate the Queen's diamond jubilee.

                I used to think Marmite was a bit overpriced as the jars don't look very big, but as the product is so flavoursome you don't have to use a lot so they work out good value for money in my opinion. Marmite can be bought from all major supermarkets and most smaller grocery shops too.

                Marmite also now makes or has made a range of other products which are flavoured with the unique Marmite taste. These include:

                Marmite Breadsticks
                Marmite Cheddar
                Marmite Rice cakes
                Marmite Crisps
                Marmite Chocolate
                Marmite Cashew Nuts

                I really enjoyed all of these products, especially the cheddar and the cashew nuts. I have to try and resist eating Marmite cheddar on a daily basis as it's basically two of my most favourite foods brought together to make something very tasty indeed!

                As mentioned above I do try and incorporate Marmite into various meals as well as enjoying Marmite sandwiches and Marmite on toast.

                One of my favourite things in the world is cheese and Marmite toasties as I love cheese toasties anyway but just by spreading on of the slices of bread with Marmite it gives the whole thing a nice kick.

                I also add a teaspoon to baked beans whenever I make them as again it gives a kick and just makes them more flavoursome. The same goes for (Quorn) spaghetti bolognaise, just a spoonful of Marmite adds a great flavour. I'm sure it is great in normal spaghetti bolognaise too but I don't like beef mince so I've never done it.

                Instead of pasta sauce I often use Marmite, as just a spoonful mixed into pasta goes a long way as when it's warm it isn't as thick so it stirs in well. I then normally mix in some cheese and it's delicious!

                When I make instant noodles (which isn't very often as they're kind of vile) instead of the small sachet of flavouring you get in the pack I use a teaspoon of Marmite to flavour them instead. I don't like instant noodles that much but flavouring them with Marmite makes them bearable if they're the only thing in the house and I can't be bothered to go shopping.

                I also like a nice drink of Marmite, whereby I dissolve a spoonful of Marmite in hot water and drink it. I thought this was pretty normal as it's just like drinking Bovril but some of my friends have said it's a bit strange.

                To be honest, I can't think of an occasion where Marmite cannot be added to a savoury dish. I literally think I could add it to everything. The only reason I don't is because I'm normally cooking for other people too and not everyone likes it.

                Overall I think it's clear to see I do love Marmite, and I would say if anyone reading this hasn't tried it, then you have to. If you don't like it then fair enough, you probably will never change your mind, and will probably find some of the things mentioned in this review disgusting!

                I love how versatile and tasty Marmite is, and also how a little goes a long way.

                (Also just thought I'd point out that Marmite is vegetarian.)

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                  02.05.2012 19:11
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                  You either love or hate it!!

                  ---Why I Bought This---

                  Well I have always been rather fond of Marmite since a child. My father would buy Bovril for himself but I never liked the 'meaty' aspect of it and much preferrred my Marmite.



                  ---The Brand---

                  Originally Marmite was sold in earthenware pots and although it has been in a glass jar since the 1920s the image of a French 'marmite' POT still graces the front label.
                  Marmite is a by-product of the brewing industry and was invented in 19th century Germany.
                  In 1902 the Marmite Food Extract Company was formed in Burton on Trent using the waste product yeast from the local brewery.



                  ---The Product---

                  I purchased the 125 size.
                  Chunky brown glass jar with a yellow plastic lid.
                  The front yellow label has a large 'MARMITE' and also an image of an earthenware jar.
                  Yeast extract, rich in B vitamins and suitable for vegetarians.
                  Produced by Unilever.
                  Long shelf life - mine is up to August 2013
                  There is a round label on the plastic lid which, when pulled back, revealed the nutritional qualities.



                  ---Nutrition---

                  Per 4g (adult serving)
                  Energy 39kJ/9kcal
                  Protein 1.5g
                  Carbohydrate 0.8g
                  Fibre 0.1g
                  Sodium 0.2g
                  Niacin 6.4mg (35.6% RDA)
                  Thiamin 0.23mg (16.6% RDA)
                  Riboflavin 0.28mg (17.5% RDA)
                  Folic Acid 100.0μg (50.0% RDA)
                  Vitamin B12 0.6μg (60.0% RDA)
                  (RDA = Recommended Daily Allowance)



                  ---Cost for Glass Jars---

                  £1.50 for 125 grams at Tesco.
                  £2.80 for 250 grams at Tesco.
                  £4.75 for 500 grams at Tesco.


                  ---My Opinion---

                  I love Marmite, but as the TV ads keep telling us - you either love or hate it. It is rich and flavoursome and somewhat salty - but at least it does you good with all the vitamins it contains. I tend t enjoy it in a sandwich with slices of cheese - although the consensus seems to be that it is best eaten on toast. I have always had it with white bread - these sandwiches were also lovely with crisps but I have now given those up.
                  I have recently tried Marmite out on toast and must admit it is very tasty and enjoyable and I think I now prefer it that way too - why did it take me so long to discover eating it that way?
                  I am pretty much the only one in the house who will eat Marmite, though hubby will sometimes have a little on crackers - son will not touch it with a barge pole - but as far as I know he has never even tried it - perhaps the smell is enough to put him off!
                  I also loved Marmite flavoured crisps and I also really like the merchandise that is now produced with images of Marmite jars.
                  Personally I would not want to buy it in squeezy jars as I love the old fashionsed shape of the dark brown glass jars - perhaps I had better keep some before they are phased out!
                  I have not tried the other versions of Marmite (an extra strong version is sale at Tesco) nore the novelty chocolate bars that was doing the rounds at Christmastime.



                  ---Star Rating---

                  5 stars - give it a try!



                  ---Would I Recommend?---

                  Yes.



                  ---Websites---

                  www.marmite.com



                  ---Full Ingredients---

                  Yeast Extract
                  Salt
                  Vegetable Extract
                  Niacin
                  Thiamin
                  Spice Extracts
                  Riboflavin
                  Folic Acid
                  Celery Extract
                  Vitamin B12.

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                    13.04.2012 14:40
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                    Mark out of 10: 9

                    I've got to say, hands down, I love Marmite. I really, really love Marmite.
                    Marmite the brand name of yeast extract in a jar. It has a sticky consistency, unusual salty (umami) taste and is dark brown in colour. It is a versatile food, which is rich in vitamins and low in calories. The only downside is that it is a bit high in salt.
                    There are many reasons why I love it, including the unusual taste, the versatility and the fact that it is completely vegetarian. I can remember the first time I tried Marmite as a child; it was the traditional Marmite on toast. I loved everything about this tangy treat, so much so that I took Marmite sandwiches to school almost everyday for a year.
                    As I have grown older, my love of Marmite has not faded, and I have found many new and exciting uses for this delicious delight. I now use Marmite in ways that I had never considered before. Marmite is fantastic on toast, in sandwiches and on crackers, but it is also really good in other things. I frequently use a teaspoon of Marmite to flavour soups, sauces and as a stock to flavour vegetarian mince.
                    Marmite is so easy to use because it can be spread straight onto food, put into sauces or diluted to make a stock. Its unusual salty taste means that it can add a tang to anything. It is a very distinctive flavour, so I would always say , try a little to taste, and add more if needed.
                    Marmite comes in different sized jars, from teeny tiny to enormous, so you will always be able to find a size that suits your personal usage. I personally find that a small jar of Marmite, won't last me long at all. It is quite good value for money, as a jar will last quite a long time.
                    If you don't like strong, salty, savoury flavours Marmite is not for you, if you love Marmite, I salute you.

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                    03.02.2012 14:39
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                    I love marmite, and my son even converted my hubby to it as well.

                    I do love toast and marmite first thing in the morning, my boy loves it as well. We have it in sandwhiches and with cheese. My husband liked it at all, he was part of the hate party you might say. But our son soon changed that as he used to sit on my hubbys lap and shove marmite toast fingers into his Dad's mouth. So he had no choice but to eat it.

                    Now he speads it thickly on toast even more than I do! Now that's a convert right there. I don't know about the love it or hate it saying now as he seems to have been turned for the better.

                    It also helps to beef up some homemade sauces I have a few uses for this lovely spread. I would say its the best way to get the morning going.

                    Also great for a pick me up after a heavy night as it has b vitamins. Marmite on toast and a glass of fresh orange juice.

                    I'm sorry that this review seems to offend the people who have read it and I have been emailed by a member to say that my spelling was awful because of this review. I have corrected this.

                    I now hope that you find this review useful.

                    Thank you for reading.

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                    07.09.2011 20:40
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                    Marmite spread is delicous, I would recommend this to my friends.

                    When we were children, my brother and I were weaned on to Marmite with bread and butter, and right from the beginning we were hooked. Even now, many years later,we are still eating Marmite,and have passed the desire for Marmite on to our children! Marmite can be eaten in lots of different ways, and is also sold as Marmite crisps (which are too salty to eat on their own for my taste) and Marmite Rice Crackers -which I don't like either.

                    Marmite on plain rice crackers is nice, but Marmite on top of cream crackers and butter is even better! You can also use it as a cooking ingredient, such as a teaspoon of Marmite stirred into gravy for a beef dish, it can even be used as a delicous addition to mince and other meats. It really is versatile, try it dissolved into a mug of boiling water, let it cool a little and then drink, enjoying the rich savoury taste, but Marmite is actually a vegetarian product even though it has a "meaty" taste.

                    My favourites are Marmite on toast, on toast on top of a poached egg, on cream crackers, and on rice crackers. Butter two slices of bread (I prefer white!)then spread Marmite on the bread, add cheese and put the second piece of bread on top to make a nutritious and delicious sandwhich. Also try Marmite crisps in bread and butter, a crunchy treat.............. Seriously, what could be more delicious than toasted bread, butter and lavish helpings of Marmite on top, bliss.

                    I absolutely adore Marmite, I just can't believe that some people DONT, how can that be, what's not to love?

                    Apart from tasting delicous Marmite is nutritious and packed full of B Vitamins, and is available in a squeezy jar (it looks like the normal jar but upside down!) so it's even easier to use, just squeeze and spread. It's also possible to follow Marmite on Youtube or Facebook,they have a web page that gives information on recipes and nutrition. Marmite is actually a by-product of beer brewing, so you can have all the taste and vitamins without having a hangover the next day!

                    It's available to buy in most supermarkets, as -even though it has its detractors - it's a very popular product, and comes in different sizes so you can buy the one that suits you, but be warned, buy the biggest jar available as you won't be able to stop eating it! But beware, don't be too heavy handed with the spread or you may find you can't eat it at all!

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                      11.08.2011 23:13
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                      Everyone should try Marmite at least once!

                      Regardless of what people say about either loving or hating Marmite, I personally can take it or leave it. Yes, I like it but I wouldn't go as far to say I love it.

                      How on earth does one describe the taste of Marmite? It's a savoury taste, perhaps a little bitter and quite salty. It really does have a distinctive taste which makes it impossible to compare to any other food. Or at least, any other food I have ever come across.
                      It's thick in consistency and really rather difficult to spread. It's brown in colour, a dark shade at first but much lighter when spread onto whatever you want to spread it on.

                      Prices differ from place to place but typically a large pot of Marmite, 500g, will cost around £5. 250g costs around £2.50 and 125g about £1. You will find yourself paying more for Marmite in the squeeze bottle. In this packaging you're likely to pay just under £5 for 400g and just under £3 for 200g.
                      Personally I do not see a need for the squeeze bottle. I like Marmite in small doses, too much is horrible. Getting the required small amount is much easier when dipping the tip of a knife into a glass put than it is squeezing it on top of your toast etc.

                      What I do love about Marmite is the fact that, given you like the taste, pretty much everyone is free to enjoy it regardless of your dietary needs. In fact, when I was diagnosed with Anaemia a nutritionist recommended Marmite to me! It appears Marmite is actually quite good for you as it contains all sorts of vitamins, even small servings.
                      Marmite is pretty much made of yeast extract, it's fine for vegetarians and vegans to eat. And contains no wheat or gluten. So if you have any problems with those you're free to eat Marmite as well.

                      It contains no saturated fat and 100g contains just 231 calories. With the tiny amount which is needed to give the best flavour you're hardly consuming any calories at all with each serving.

                      There are a never ending amount of serving suggestions for Marmite. In fact there are so many there are a number of Marmite Cook Books available to purchase from a number of places.
                      I find it pretty much goes with anything. Like most, I do enjoy a tiny bit underneath a bit of melted cheese on toast. And, if you also like this I would definitely recommend purchasing some Marmite cheese if you get the chance, it is beautiful.
                      I also like a little bit mixed into mash potato or spread on rice cakes. It certainly livens up my diet when I'm trying to lose a little weight.

                      I would recommend at least trying Marmite once. I would agree that is a required taste and there is a possibility you won't like it. There is also the possibility you will fall in love with it. Or, like me, just enjoy a bit every now and again. Whatever you think, the claim that it repels mosquitoes is just a myth!

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                        20.06.2011 19:53

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                        Mmmmmm, Marmite!

                        Despite being told you either love it or hate it, I am relieved to reveal that Marmite haters; it's okay!
                        I used to hate Marmite (and not just when I was little) but one day I woke up and fancied Marmite. My mum had made Marmite on toast and offered me and bite and the next thing she knew - her toast was gone. And that was that. I am now the greatest of lovers of Marmite.
                        I love that there is nothing else quite like Marmite. I also love that there are a mere 9 calories per serving; delicious and good for my diet.
                        So never fear Marmite haters, one day you too could be tucking into a Marmite sandwich or Marmite on toast. Next time someone offers you a bite of their Marmite on toast, give it a try. You never know, it could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

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                        05.05.2011 23:59
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                        A yeast extract spread for toast

                        So polarised a product that it was once renamed "I Hate" for a series of commercials, Marmite is the Napoleon Dynamite of foods, or for a music lover like myself, the Smashing Pumpkins. There's no such answer as "It's okay," you either love it or you don't. (For the record, I'm a massive Pumpkins fan, but thought ND was one of the worst movies I've ever seen).

                        It's a dark brown, almost black, treacle-like substance which is made from yeast extract. It looks like and has the consistency of congealed engine oil. It tastes bitter and leaves a strong aftertaste in your mouth. So far so good? On the plus side, it's 100% vegetarian and high in B vitamins. In other words, it's good for you.

                        What to do with it? You spread it on toast. That's pretty much it. I used to have marmite sandwiches at school but I find it better with toast, as the consistency of the bread seems to more complement the strong flavour.

                        So do I love it or hate it? I think it's great. It's one of those things that makes you want to brush your teeth, but despite that you feel healthy after eating it. It's difficult to find where I live in Japan (though when I moved into my first apartment, I found two and a half jars left behind by the previous teacher, with a Japanese translation stuck over the original English, meaning they were for sale in an import store somewhere - in seven years since I've been unable to find the store he bought them in) so a jar made it into my suitcase after my most recent trip home. And I don't regret the space it took up, I'd buy it again.

                        I'd recommend Marmite to anyone, but be warned, at least 50% of you will hate it.

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