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Hints & Tips On Colouring Hair At Home

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      09.11.2008 20:41
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      give it a try

      As working in a hair dressers you see all sorts of things people come in with hair colours gone wrong dodgey hair cuts the lot.

      And the worst is when people with really dark hair think they can just chuck a blonde dye on and it will go the colour on the box when u have to pre pig it first buy that i mean bye a light browny red and keep going lighter for a while but best bet it to use a hairdressers where they have the bleach or go to your local sally's and bye a bleach and powder yourself.

      Also when you you are a really light blonde and want to go dark like me the lady i worked for put a red on my hair and then after washing it of put the colour i wanted on because it would have gone a really wierd colour and after it was done it had a tint in and loked really nice and fresh.

      So my advice is if your going lighter if you dont have the powder and bleach go lighter a few times and then aplly blonde.

      And if your going darker use a redish or chestnut first before your apply your dark colour it will give it a nice tint to.

      Also if you want half your hair one colour and top another my advice is to get an even half up half down look and clip the top lot up if dying the bottom but if dying to top foil ure bottom half lair up with tin foil whilst dying your top.

      Also after dying your hair make sure to rap it with foil and it keeps all the heat in and gets a better looking colour.

      And doing it yourself is much cheaper.

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      14.03.2003 17:20
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      Once upon a time there was a young girl who in the late 80's had a lovely perm and dyed blonde hair. One day when the curly perm had almost grown out and the young girl had managed to grow her hair to her shoulders she had it cut into a smashing looking one length bob. The young girl had always been 'a one' for dyeing her own hair and now she had a lovely new barnet, the straight style threw up a problem with root re-growth. A two tone blonde with a couple of inches of mucky looking brown at the roots was not a fantastic look. I know, she thought, why not buy some brown hair dye and go back to the natural look. She did. She dyed. She cried. Taking you back now to primary school art classes, the young girl had forgotten that mixing brown paint and yellow paint gave you green paint. Had she thought of it and applied it to hairdyeing techniques she might have figured that yellow hair + brown dye = green hair. A few desparate phone calls and a hair cut later the young girl rid herself of the evil green haze that had covered her head. She vowed never to dye brown on top of blonde again. The moral of this story is, if you must do hair dyeing yourself, and you want to go from blonde to brown, use a red first. This does, in fact, turn your hair pink; but means that then using a brown on top gives you brown hair not, khaki green.

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        05.03.2003 17:48
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        I have always been into dying my hair. I love the change of image and the different styles of cloths which go with another hair dye. People have told my my hair will fall out with all the dying but I'm in my forties, haven't gone grey yet and none of my hair has fallen out. So I will carry on doing it and having fun too. There's a few things to remember when your dying your hair, the first thing is to read the instructions, this may seem a silly thing to say but you'll be surprised at how many people just mix up the ingredients then slap it on their hair, only to turn out a bright orange colour or worse, then they have to either hide or dye it a colour they never wanted to be. If you are wanting to go blonde and have dark brown or black hair, always use a pre-lightener first.These can be bought at the same shops which sell hair dye, superdrug, the bodycare shop, chemists. This will lighten your hair ready for the colour of your choice, always try to remember to pick a colour which is going to look natural and not like it comes out of a bottle. There are some very good but expensive ranges of hair colour out these days, some work with your hairs highlights for a natural looking colour. I always buy these brands. Always remember to do a hair strand test, from hair which is underneath then it doesn?t show if you don't like the colour, this will give you an idea of which colour your going to be, as some cheaper brands of hair dye are not always the same colour as they show on the packet. There will be rubber gloves in the packet too, these should be used as the hair dye will irritate your skin or even dye it if your going to a darker colour and it takes ages to get off if you don't wash it straight away. A good tip for getting hair dye off the skin it to use nail polish remover, this will do the trick but may sting a bit, still it's better than walking around with a dyed face or neck. Always
        remember to wear an old tee-shirt too. I have seen many a ruined top through spillage of hair dye on it. If your into dying your hair other colours like blue, red, green, yellow or any of the other punky type colours, then if you want to get a bright colour for the end result . Use lorreal super blonde first, this will take you hair to nearly white if you leave it on for 30 mins. Then once it's dry you can add the colour of your choice. Colours can be bought from hippie shops for around four pounds and if you have long hair you?ll need to buy two. Leave the desired colour on your hair for 30 minutes or longer, I used to leave mine for about an hour but I'm older now and only stick to the blonde, blacks or reds which can be bought in bottles. Once you have left your colour on for the desired time rinse off. You will now have a colour blue, green, red, ect which is bright and will not fade too quickly. If your into dying your hair, have fun.

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          22.11.2001 22:58
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          Well, you know what they say, take a peak down south, and you’ll soon find out. Mind you, having said that, Marilyn Monroe apparently had blonde pubes, and she was no natural blonde! Lets face it, who can really be bothered to go for the all ‘over look’? What you want, is a reliable hair ‘colourant’, to use the posh terminology, that will turn you into the colour you were born to be, rather than the colour you were born with. It is also an added bonus if you can find a product that will turn your hair blonde, without making you look like Lilly Savage after a head on collision with a combine-harvester. An obvious packet job with hair the texture of straw, and colour brassier than brass itself, is certainly no good look. At this stage I must come clean and tell you that this opinion is an extension of an op on Garnier 'Natea'. I originally wrote a short op, but when I decided to write a proper opinion, it remained buried in my profile. As the op contains a few bits of advice on colouring your hair at home, I hope you'll agree that it qualifies for the category I have moved it to. So, am I qualified to write an opinion on this product, ‘ Garnier Natea Nourishing Hair Mask’? Of course I am, although obviously if you saw me you wouldn’t necessarily think ‘bottle blonde’. Obviously, you could probably do better with a professional colourist, but last time I went to Tony & Guy, had my colour done and a trim, it set me back £120! That was some time ago now. These days I use this product every 8 weeks, and find I get consistent results, at a fraction of the cost. Here is what the the Manufacturer Says about ‘Chamomile’, the colour I use; ‘Garnier’s latest innovation, Natea is the first permanent hair colour in a masque. Natea Camomile is an extra-lightening shade, that gives you a very light blonde result in one easy step, withou
          t any pre-lightening.’ Never mind the masque bit, that just simply means that it doesn’t run down your face while your waiting for the colour to develop, the important bit, is that you don’t need to pre-lighten your hair. You may have seen boxes of pre-lightener(or Hydrogen Peroxide, to use swear words), that have to be applied before you can add the shade of blonde your hoping for. Natea has several different shades of blonde that already have the correct strength of Hydrogen Peroxide, together with all the other chemicals you would rather not think of when trying to turn yourself into that smug baby blonde from the 80’s Timotei commercial, you know, the one that washed her hair by a river, blissfully happy because a shampoo had transformed her life, and left her without a proper water supply! This particular shade, is suitable for those with brown or light brown hair, and those with dark to light blonde hair. Personally(and keep it to yourself, I have a reputation to maintain), I have a dark ‘mousy’ tone to my hair, neither blonde, nor a nice rich brown, and I find the product has the desired effect. I wake up the morning after, ready to prove to the world that today, I am going to have more fun! So, for a ‘radiant, long lasting blonde result’, them, not me, slip on the disposable gloves provided, trying not to stick your finger through them straight away, take the contents of the box, mix together, shake well, and get down to the root of the problem. It's also important that you stand totally naked whilst applying the colour, because then you won't get any of it on your best Christie towels or that new top you've just bought. What You Get ~~~~~~~~~~~~ · Developer Milk · Nourishing Cream Masque · Fruit Oil Concentrate · After Colour Nourishing Conditioner. · Instruction leaflet and gloves. What You Have To Do ~~~~~~~
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~ You mix the first three items together in the bottle provided, snip off the top, and apply. Over the months, I have developed my own way of doing this to prevent coating the hair that is already blonde. I kind of brush through the roots, in streaks, using the nib, no actual brush. When I’ve done this, I give the roots a little rub, just to make sure they are all coated, then I climb into a nice hot bath, and wait. Obviously, because I am already naked, I save valuble time! A word of warning here, first applications take around 30 minutes, retouch applications 25, and applying the product over pre-coloured hair(already lightened), needs even less time. Make sure you take a really boring book with you, so that you don’t get carried away, checking the progress of the colour’s development after having read the majority of the book, or Lilly Savage you will certainly be. Keep a mirror and a watch near by, and quickly get that concoction off your Barnet as soon as you've reached the Timotei look. Extra Tips ~~~~~~~~~~ - Open the window while you do your hair or you'll suffocate. - Apply a little vaseline around your hairline to protect the skin and prevent unsightly alien colour changes. - Don't use this particular shade if you have black hair or you'll end up looking like Cilla Black. - If it all goes wrong, don't blame it on me. Home hair dying is well known for it's cock-ups! I find this product works very quickly on my hair, and I tend to leave it on for no more than 20 minutes, but it’s a matter of keeping a close eye and experience. You may have noticed that some ‘fruit oil concentrate’ is included with the colourant. It’s meant to moisturise while you treat your locks with all these chemicals, and thus leave it having ‘body and shine’. They say it makes your hair ‘really come alive̵
          7;. Hardly, my hair dies the minute it is pushed from my scalp, and I’m sure yours does too. Anyhow, it’s a nice touch, and together with the after colour ‘nourishing conditioner’, my hair does feel soft and smooth, so it can’t be all bad. The Results ~~~~~~~~~~~ The results I get, are the reason why I keep coming back to this product time and time again. O.K, so I’ll never be a natural blonde again, I said goodbye to that at the age of 14, but the results could be a lot worse. I get a rich golden blonde result, that doesn’t look over cooked, and as long as I keep the product off the hair that is already blonde, the condition of my hair stays reasonably good, and a far cry from the brassy, dried out result that is so often achieved by dyeing one’s own hair. Garnier offer a customer care line on 0845 399 0104(UK), and 1850 604 104(Eire). Round Up ~~~~~~~~ Garnier Natea is a simple to use product that gives consistent results, and that’s all I’m going to say, as the company aren’t paying me to help flog their product. If you are a natural blonde, and feel in need of a change, the product comes in plenty of other colours, if you fancy going darker and becoming brown, black or even flame haired. A final word of warning though, and NOT speaking from personal experience, keep it away from your pubes, or your hair won’t be the only thing that’s flaming! Blonde joke coming up just to prove that blondes don't take themselves too seriously. Dedicated to Pepperann. Hope you like this chuck! Q: What do you call a blonde who dye's their hair brunette? A: Artificial intelligence! Juliet, intelligent and naturally blonde(once).

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            09.09.2001 06:16
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            Sorry to be somewhat obvious and patronising with that title but you'd be surprised how many people DON'T do the most obvious and simple thing. A while ago I used to work on the hair colour section of Boots the Chemists too and you'd be amazed how many people had disasters purely because they hadn't read the pack/instructions first! I feel somewhat qualified to write about this subject as I have been devotedly dying my hair every colour under the sun since I was 13 years old (I'm now 34) and think I have undergone my own share of near disasters too! Firstly, whatever colour you select or yearn to be the result will be dependent on the hair colour you start off with be it already coloured or natural. For brighter colours this may involve pre-lightening your hair to remove old colourant or achieve a light enough base to avoid those horrible orange or green shades that can sometimes result. To be fair these days most modern off-the-shelf colours are much more gentle and reliable with guidance charts on the packs to show expected results and comprehensive instructions so really there should be no reason for hideous disasters. I think one of the most common mistakes for a disappointing colour result is leaving the hair colourant to develop for too short or too long a time, giving either a too light or too intense shade respectively - hence the stories of orange or green results. This is usually the result of people panicking when they see the colour of the mixture on their hair - usually no indication of the final colour result - brown can look black, blonde can look brown or blue and so on. To avoid such panic or horror over the results always do what it advises you to do in every pack of hair colourant i.e. a STRAND TEST! This involves either finding an inconspicuous area of hair on your head or snipping s small section off and testing the mixed colourant on that first. Then you can determine the correct
            development time and a more definite result to be expected. This is especially important on previously coloured or lightened hair or hair with a high percentage of grey in it. If your colour result is too dark often a few washes with a strong shampoo will help lighten it up. If the shade is too light you may need to re-apply the colour or choose a slightly darker shade. On to other practicalities - when colouring your hair it is advisable to wear plastic gloves to guard again staining your skin or aggravating sensitive skin on the hands - especially if you have any cuts. Wear an old T-shirt or wrap an old towel round your shoulders because, no matter how careful you think you are being, there always tend to be a few escapee globs of colourant somewhere! A smear of Vaseline or similar around your hairline will help avoid tell-tale stain marks on your face too. And beware the mess in the bathroom, in the sink, on towels, even on the walls if you tend to splash about a bit! Home hair colouring can be a messy business but it can be very successful and save you a fortune in hairdressing costs in the long run. Believe me - I know! :o)

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              18.08.2001 04:09
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              • "too permanent"

              Summer is almost over and what little sun we have had played havoc with my already drastic hair. Having used a brush on streaking tint some months earlier, the sun then bleached my hair to a never before attained bright orange. Viewing holiday snaps was the last straw - the streaks had to go,but no expensive hairdressing parlours for me, oh no, I could do it myself......or so I thought. A £4.99 bottle of Clairol Lasting Colour should do the trick I thought, and medium golden brown sounded relatively safe and rather refined. Armed with the product I secluded myself in my bathroom, candles lit, aromatherapy oils at the ready with talc, perfume and bubbles galore I relaxed in the bath with the Lasting Care evenly (so I thought) plastered over my luxuriant (well o.k. brittle and damaged) tresses. After the relevant time I washed the product out and glanced excitedly into the window expecting to see a subdued and quietly classy result......but NO CHANCE. The vision staring back at me in the mirror recoiled in horror.......was that Morticia from the Adams Family I saw there - surely not, the package had clearly stated medium golden brown. Medium Golden Brown my hair definitely was not. Pitch black would have been an apt description with not a golden hair in sight, nor indeed a brown one either. The relaxing effects of my luxurious soak had now completely disappeared as I frantically rewashed my hair, after all the product was not permanent.......or was it? Ten washes and two hours later there I was still looking like the Wicked Witch from the West with long black hair and a whitewashed face(because of the shock I expect)as well. Two weeks have now passed and guess what.......yep I still have blackish hair. The morale of this story is.......Do not believe everything you read on packaging. For Medium Golden Brown read black. Always, but always use a hair colour slightly lighter than the result you want. N
              othing is more ageing and demoralising than jet black hair. To make matters even worse, despite putting the Lasting Care on evenly (as I thought) I was actually left with one jet black horizontal stripe! ! ! In a nutshell. Clairol Lasting Care is one of the new so called demi haircolours, ie., it is not permanent, but neither does it wash out very easily. The product contains no amonia and I have to say my hair has been shiney since using it, but I would have preferred a medium brown shine to the one I'm stuck with. The colourant is relatively easy to use you merely mix the actual colour to another (presumably chemical) agent in a separate bottle. This is non messy and takes place in seconds. You add the colour to dry hair - leave it for l0 - 20 minutes and then wash out. Finally you add the conditioner which comes with the product. Gloves are supplied but no plastic hat, so have some old towels at hand. I've tried to find the ingredients on the internet, but to no avail and in my shock I threw out the bottle....swearing never to use the stuff again, however I do remember it did not contain Peroxide. I've used Loving Care in the past as it's supposed to cover grey hair. I found this somewhat more gentle, but again the colours are very flat. Some good advice I have since read is that a quarter of a cup full of baking soda mixed with shampoo lifts out colour quickly and I may certainly try this in the next day or so, but if you are considering colouring your hair, take my advice......go to the hairdressers it saves a lot of tears, embarrassment and frustration. £4.99 from all leading chemists and supermarkets if you really are a fan of Morticia of the Adams Family.

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                31.05.2001 03:03
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                Redhead23 is in 'Hair Mode' today! I've just written an Op about a particularly disappointing brand of hair dye and as I am typing this Op, my hair is a smelly mess of bleach - a preparation for getting the long overdue roots of my naturally dark brown hair back into full 'redhead' glory! So what better way to pass the waiting time than to write an opinion full of tricks and tips on the subject, sharing my experience that I have gained over more than 6 years (8 if you include Henna)? I've tried hanging my washing with my bleach-fuelled hair, but the embarrassing stares from the neighbours have forced me back onto my computer now, so... ------ Choosing your Hair Dye ----- The reasons why more and more people end up going out to chemists to get their hands on DIY hair colouring kits are numerous, but I think it is fair to say that there are to main categories: Those who fancy a change (or are just fed up with a dull natural colour, like I am) and those who want to cover their grey hairs. There is also a much larger choice of products available than a few years ago, and the procedure can be very expensive if you have it done professionally, plus a hairdresser's usually only uses one specific brand of dye that might not have the colour you like - so DIY dye kits are the obvious choice! But no matter how nice your friend's (or Mum's, auntie's or whatever) hair looked after his/her treatment, he or she won't have exactly the same type and colour of hair as you do, so before you just go out and buy the first pack of hair dye that tickles your fancy or that someone recommended to you, there are a few questions you should ask yourself: - Permanent or semi-permanent? All hair dyes available should contain information about the durability of the treatment on the outside of the package - when you dye your hair for the first time, it is important to conside
                r which type you would prefer. There are three main types of durability available: Grade I: Wash-Out These come in all sorts of shades and are available as sprays, hair mascara, gels or mousse. The colours in these ranges are often very funky, but they will vanish once you washed your hair a few times (1-6 washes). I don't normally use these, but they are ideal to test if your chosen colour suits you at all, or if you just want to make a stunning impression at a party and then want to go back to normal the next day. Although the results (especially on darker hair) are sometimes a bit disappointing, you will not lose much because you can simply wash it out if you don't like it! If you have very light hair though, it may be more advisable to use a more permanent dye, as the result will be very intense and while the dye is washing out, all 'stages' will be visible and it may still be partly visible weeks after the application. Grade II: Semi-Permanent These usually last a little longer than Grade I dyes (up to 24 washes or 6 weeks), and they sometimes contain ammonia (developing cream) but no bleach. This means that they do not permanently alter the structure and colour of your hair and can be fully washed out over time without leaving your grown-out roots stick out like a sore thumb. They are ideal for first-timers (as you won't do permanent damage if you distribute it unevenly or you don't like the colour) or for people who change their colour quite regularly, but will not usually cover grey hairs fully. The choice of colours is wider than with permanent dyes, but the results are often not as intense as you might want them to be, and if you have to bleach your hair (more about that later) before the application, you might have to re-apply another package very soon because if the colour fades on bleached hair it will look messy very quickly. I would recommend the Wella colour mousse
                range as well as the Schwarzkopf Live! semi-permanent colours and the 'Directions' tubs (I've only ever seen those in the more trendy clothes and accessory shops though) - the first two are available in both natural and funky colours, while 'Directions' cater more for the punky colours, ranging from light blue over purple to fire-engine red, pink and green. Grade III: Permanent These dyes are, as the name says, permanent, i.e. even if they partly fade (they shouldn't, but most do anyway!), your roots will become visible once your hair has grown. Permanent colours usually contain ammonia and a bit of bleach, which helps the colour to get into your hair - this means that the colour will stay in longer and that you can achieve good results without bleaching separately as long as your desired colour is not too different from that of your natural hair. They offer the most efficient grey coverage and are most suitable for those among us who plan to dye their hair regularly - especially if you chose a colour that is very different from your natural shade, you will have to dye it again once the different-coloured roots become too unsightly, but you can of course choose a shade close to your own for the second go so the roots won't be too noticeable once your hair has grown a bit. I can recommend Laboratoire Garnier 'Belle-Color' for excellent grey coverage (my Mum has used this for years, and she went grey in her late twenties!), supermarkets' and chemists' own brands often offer a cheap and wide range of more natural shades and brands like 'Feria' or 'Natéa' offer both natural shades and some special 'funky' ones. My personal favourite for intense reds (they also have blues and purples) is Schwarzkopf Live! though - this range has a lot of quite special colours and gives you long-lasting and intensive results. - What Colour do I want? If you dye your
                hair for the first time, you should choose a shade that is not too far off your natural colour, as this will make it easier to use semi-permanent colours, which are more suitable for first-time users. The package of such products will usually give details about the hair colours it is suitable for, and the colour types are usually divided into three colour groups: Light (light to dark blonde), Medium (dark blonde/light red to medium brown) and Dark (dark brown to black). While a temporary or semi-permanent dye is usually only suitable for dyeing your hair in a similar colour to your own, permanent dyes will allow for a wider range - if you have dark hair, permanent ruby reds and chestnut browns will still be visible, if you have very light hair, a permanent dark dye will give deeper and more even shades of black. (Choosing a very dark temporary dye on light hair - or if you have a lot of grey hairs - can leave you with an uneven, messy look, while light shades are often ineffective on dark hair) The package will also tell you whether or not you have to pre-lighten your hair prior to dyeing it - I would not recommend you to do this if you are colouring your hair for the first time, unless you have an experienced friend who can apply the bleach for you. Once you have a feeling for applying hair dye yourself, it is perfectly fine to use a pre-lightener (= bleach) if you have very dark hair and would like to go for a lighter brown or red shade, but if you want to go from dark beauty to perfect blonde, I would recommend you to get this done professionally - while the modern pre-lighteners don't usually make your hair fall out, it is extremely difficult to get even results and when you follow the bleaching with a blonde dye (as opposed to a darker shade that covers better) you will not always be able to even out the differences. If you are not sure about the colour you have chosen (maybe it is a bit risqué or you are not sure w
                hether it will cover properly), I would advise you to have a darker, more permanent shade ready - if your first attempt goes wrong, wash your hair properly, dry it and apply the darker shade evenly, nobody will ever have to know about the first disaster! ;-) - Natural or Chemical If you think 'natural' hair colours, then Henna springs to mind, a root that has been used for centuries to dye and condition hair, but there are other 'natural' products available on the market. Most of them come in the form of ground herbs, but you can also buy 'chemical' hair dyes that use natural ingredients to do the colouring. The problem I had with Henna is that it is terribly hard to apply - you have to put it in a bowl and put hot water over it, which results in a green pap that has the consistency of porridge and is thus nigh-on impossible to apply evenly (even if someone applies it for you). The colour results of purely natural dyes are often unpredictable, and it is not recommended to use conventional hair dye before the Henna-treated hair has fully grown out, as this could lead to a completely different colour than you intended to put on. But even if you can't see a colour difference after a Henna treatment, your hair will be much thicker and fuller- I've tried various brands of pure Henna dyes but never got far with them colour-wise, but it's a proper boost for worn-out, dry hair. 'Semi-natural' hair dyes (for example Schwarzkopf 'Country Colours') on the other hand are limited in their colour ranges (mostly 'natural' ones obviously) but usually give good results and are often a bit gentler on your hair. For very intense 'natural' colours, try 'Clairol Herbal Essences', especially their red shades are very strong and vibrant! - Length and Condition of your Hair It is not recommended to dye your hair just after a perm, as this might res
                ult in an extremely intense colour or, if you use an ammonia-based dye, might make your hair brittle and dry - pre-lightening it in such a condition would be hair suicide! If you have just slightly dry hair, this shouldn't be too much of a problem - most dyes nowadays contain added oils and vitamins, and even pre-lighteners have become quite gentle. I usually use the Laboratoires Garnier 'Natéa' pre-lightener, which has added oils and barely stings, the supplied conditioner also leaves my hair shiny and smelling lovely. People with very long hair should always buy two packets of the same product, as even large packets of 100ml (especially ammonia-free products often provide much less) or mousses (which is usually very efficient) will not be enough to cover it all and it will end up uneven and messy. You might also want someone to do the dyeing for you if you have long or very curly hair, my hair is relatively short at the back and I have a feeling for distributing the dye evenly by now, but especially at the back it can become tricky with full and longer hair. Do not attempt to dye your hair if you have any open wounds or freshly-squeezed/inflamed zits (sorry for being so graphic ;-) ) on your scalp - wait until they have healed, as it would otherwise sting very badly! ---- Preparation ----- Okay, so you have bought your desired hair dye, but you'll have to be a little patient before you start - first off, read through the instructions and check the contents of the packet. If it contains gloves, you're fine with those, but if it doesn't (or you prefer better gloves) then get your hands on some proper ones - you should be able to buy them from chemists. If you have never used the product before, you should do an allergy test to make sure that you are not allergic to any of the ingredients - mix a little bit of the product and dab it onto an area of your skin and leave it for a
                while. If it doesn't cause itching or burning, you are pretty safe to use it on your hair. Most brands also recommend a 'Strand Test', which means that you either mix a bit of the product together and apply it to a secluded strand of your hair, or you apply the mixture on a strand you cut off, using a bowl (don't leave it on Mum's pricey dinner table!). After the recommended time (usually 20 minutes), wipe off a bit of the product to check the intensity of the result, then test again in 10 minute intervals. If you have used the same product before, this won't be necessary, but if you go for a new/different colour it is pretty handy, although the full result often looks quite different from the test strand. For the application you will need one or two old towels and an old top (and trousers, because you might spill some dye on them). Make sure you have removed all your jewellery from the neck- and head-area - the dye (and/or) bleach should not affect them, but especially necklaces can get in the way when you're washing off the dye and can also end up smearing the stuff all over your neck and back. It is always handy to have an old comb ready to help distribute the dye - make sure it is a 'wide' one though, as a very fine comb will only end up wiping the dye off your hair again. Remove any rugs from the bathroom and take toothbrushes, soap dishes and other bits off the washbasin - it'll save you having to clean them later! Cover the bathroom floor with old newspapers or plastic sheets if you have a non-wipeable surface. ---- Pre-Lightening ~ 30-60 minutes ----- (Ignore if you don't need this) As I said, I would not recommend this for your first hair dye experiment, but maybe you already have experience with colouring your hair and want to try your hand at a more risky colour that requires pre-lightening, so here goes: WARNING: The bleaching process is not r
                eversible, be it on your hair or on your clothes/curtains/carpets - make sure you really want to do it and wear old clothes and cover carpets and rugs etc. Most pre-lighteners are quite gentle nowadays, and a good brand of hair dye will contain the necessary information on the packet - if possible, buy a pre-lightener from the same brand as your dye, as the packet of dye will contain information such as 'for medium brown hair, use XXX pre-lightener with 1 sachet of bleach' and 'for dark brown to black hair, use XXX pre-lightener with 2 sachets of bleach', which are relevant to the same-brand pre-lightener and you might end up under-or overdosing the bleach if you use a brand that uses different measuring units. Brush your hair well before starting, or wash it if the instruction requires you to do so - make sure that the bottles from your packet of hair dye are stowed away, as you could otherwise end up mixing them up with those from the bleach kit! A packet of bleach usually contains 2 different bottles and one or two sachets of bleach, plus a conditioner - mix the two bottles (one is the applicator bottle, the other the pre-lightening shampoo) and add the bleach as stated on your hair dye packet. This can be quite messy, as the white bleach powder goes anywhere BUT into the application bottle! Some pre-lighteners also contain phials or bottles of special oils (Jojoba is popular), which you will have to put into the bottle as well. Now close the bottle and shake well - make sure there are no blobs of powder left, but don't wait too long before you break off the applicator nozzle, as the mixture will warm up and expand, if you wait too long you'll have splashes of bleach everywhere! Put on the gloves and start applying the bleach, first on the tips of your hair, leaving the roots for now - these are much more sensitive to the bleaching process and will react far quicker than the rest of your hair. U
                se the comb to distribute the product evenly and leave it for as long as stated in the instructions. ---------------------------------------------- A little word of warning: You must NOT wrap aluminium foil around your head after applying the bleach - you may have seen hairdressers do this when they do highlights, but they use special foil and ordinary aluminum foil will trigger a reaction (through the heat etc.) that may well cost you your mane. Just do everything according to instructions and don't try any gimmicks, and bleach will soon become your best friend! ---------------------------------------------- After the initial waiting time, check the intensity and apply the rest of the mixture onto the roots and again distribute it evenly, making sure you cover every strand properly. Then wait again (for me, this takes 5 to 10 minutes, although the instructions usually say ~15-20 minutes) until your roots are on the same level. If you now have platinum blonde roots and carrot-orange tips, don't be afraid - unless you want to dye your hair in a very light shade, the dye will be able to cover this difference easily. Then lather your hair (most pre-lighteners contain added shampoo) and wait for 10 minutes (or as long as the instructions say) before washing it off and applying the supplied conditioner. Make sure that there is no bleach left in your hair and rinse well. I wouldn't advise you to blow-dry your hair - bleaching is a very demanding process, towel-drying your hair will be much gentler. Throw away the rest of the mixture - if you have any stubborn stains in your bathroom or if you have blocked drains, feel free to use the mixture for it, it's bleach after all and my Dad swears by it to clean their houses' pipes. Take a photo of your mad hairdo if you wish, as you are now ready to apply the dye! ;-) ---- Applying the Dye (~30-40 Minutes) ----- I
                f the instructions tell you to wash your hair prior to applying the dye then do so now, but do not use a conditioning shampoo as this will stop the dye from staying in your hair - do not use hairspray or mousse, if you use those products regularly, you might want to wash your hair a day before you dye it, and then refrain from using them until after you've dyed it. If you have pre-lightened your hair, towel-dry it (as above) until it reaches the 'wetness' level required by your dye - most will need your hair to be dry, others will need it to be slightly wet - then brush it. Sometime dyes will need you to wrap a hot towel or cling film around your head once you've applied it, so get these things ready if necessary. With gel or cream dyes, you may have several bottles/phials/sachets in a packet; with permanent and some semi-permanent dyes this is usually the developer fluid/cream and a tub or bottle of the colourant, plus probably a small bottle of oil. Mix them as stated in the instructions, then break the tip of the nozzle off. Again, make sure that the contents are mixed evenly and don't leave the nozzle closed too long, unless you fancy a spontaneous bathroom redesign. Some semi-permanent and especially 'Grade I' dyes often contain only one bottle, and with colour mousse you usually get a single pressure container (or pump action) bottle with a nozzle on it. To prevent the areas beneath your hairline, forehead and ears from getting stained, apply petroleum jelly (or a similar cream) to those areas. There are special creams available, but Vaseline etc. do just fine. Just make sure you don't cover bits of your hair with it as well, as the dye won't work there otherwise. Put a towel around your neck, put on your gloves and start to apply the mixture evenly, if you are just treating your roots, cover them first, otherwise distribute the product throughout your hair and make sure ever
                ything is covered - it helps to have a bathroom cabinet with mirrors on both sides, so you can check the back of your head as well. If you have splattered any dye around the bathroom, now is the time to clean it up - shower them off where you can, and use an alcohol-based toner on stubborn stains. Wipe off any large dabs of dye on your face/neck as well, but don't go wild on it as you might end up wiping it off your hair as well. Leave the mixture on as stated in the instructions (or as you found out in the strand test), then wash it off - most dyes contain a shampoo, so lather your hair properly and wash off the foam. If your packet has conditioner in it, use it now and rinse it off until the water is nearly clear (with most dyes it won't ever get crystal clear, so don't do it for too long). Other dyes ask you to use your own shampoo and conditioner, so simply follow the instructions and then towel-dry your hair once the water is more or less clear. Wash off the cream (if you used some) and use a cotton pad with an alcohol-based toner to wipe your ears, neck and forehead. Look in the mirror and admire your work of art - should the result cause any shocking emotions, it would be handy to have your hairdresser's phone number ready now! ;-P ----- Aftercare ----- If your hair has become brittle through bleaching and dyeing it, you might want to try a hair cure, but most products I have used so far have left me hair very shiny and healthy-looking, just like I wanted it. Some dyes (for example L'Oréal Récital) come with a handy bottle of colour conditioner, which you can use for the next few washes following the colouration, but there are also special 'colour lock-in' products available for colour-treated hair. They are supposed to keep the colour fresh for longer, but if you really want to keep it vibrant, you could also buy a bottle of 'colour enhancing' shampoo an
                d conditioner that is designed to enhance natural hair colours - they are mostly available in 'Blonde', 'Red' and 'Brunette' and I usually use 'Hennara' (for red shades) every other time I wash my hair, and it definitely keeps the colour longer. Another thing I do if I feel that my colour is fading, but I don't yet require a full re-dye: I buy one of those intensively red colour mousses that last about 24 washes - put over properly (and evenly) dyed hair, it stays much longer and revives the colour no end! :-) So what are you waiting for? DIY hair dyes are not as difficult as many people think, and as long as you stick to the instructions (do NOT forget the gloves - my Mum once used Henna on my hair insisting she didn't need them - that was before the whole 'Henna Tattoo' fancy obviously), you should not be too shocked when you look in the mirror. Just make sure the colour you have chosen really is the right one for you and your hair type, and off you go - if you end up with a result that really doesn't get up to the standards promised on the box, then come to DooYoo and tell us about it! My hair is long finished and dry now (I took breaks from writing obviously, otherwise the bleach would've eaten away my hair by now!) and I am very happy with my Belle-Color 'Intensive Red #30' - if you know any good fiery red shades, let me know, I'm always eager to try new ones! (c) 2001 Redhead23

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                  05.05.2001 03:31
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                  Garnier Belle colour is the best home dye that I have ever used. It is so easy and a far cry from the days when us women had to mix a paste into a bowl and smear it onto our greying roots. I used to have to pay a hairdresser to dye my hair because I used to make such a mess of it and end up looking like a Muppet. Now I can save money and dye my hair at home in half an hour. A pack of Belle colour costs £3.99 and there is a good range of natural colours to choose from. I have just used the light brown and it took me half an hour from start to finish. Ten minutes to apply and twenty minutes looking like the honey monster waiting for it to take. Each pack contains an applicator bottle with developer milk in, a tube of colour gel that you add to the bottle and a little phial of oil with Jojoba in. This oil is good because it gives your hair a silky sheen. Shake the bottle really well and break the top off of the nozzle to apply the lotion to your hair. There is no messing about, you can put it straight onto dry hair and it is a thick creamy lotion and doesn’t drip like some other dyes that I have used. It is a good idea to try an allergy test if it is the first time that you are using this product because the developer milk contains hydrogen peroxide and the colourant has ammonia in it. Some people are sensitive to this but I have not had any problems myself. A strand test is a good idea too. Obviously you have to be careful that you don’t get it in your eyes but if you do have a mishap rinse them immediately with cold water. Never use it to dye eyebrows or eyelashes, but as I have said it is a thick mixture so it doesn’t drip. When you rinse it out make sure the water runs clear and then apply the sachet of cream bath that is provided this smells like bananas and takes the ammonia smell out of your hair. My favourite bit of the whole process actually because it really does smell nic
                  e. A good product in my opinion and really easy to use, it does cover grey hairs and you have a natural look with the added benefit of a great shine too.

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                    24.03.2001 21:59
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                    If only one person reads this and takes my advice I will be happy to have saved someone the horror of my experience on being a DIY Blonde. About 6 years ago I walked into a salon and decided on a few blonde highlights to brighten up my mousy brown tresses. Three years later I was an all over nice shade of ash blonde and happy with it. It was shiny in good condition and suited my complexion. The problem was it was costing me an absolute fortune. A colleague at work had blonde hair and I asked her whether she was fed up with the expense of having her roots done every four weeks. 'Nah' she stated between chomping on her regular chunks in a variety of flavoured Hubba Bubba. 'Cost me a fiver from Superdrug I do it myself and its the same fing in it'. Hmm, I wondered to myself. The Hairdressers are obviously making a fortune out of me lets try a DIY job. The next weekend armed with my fiver and many a butterfly in my stomach feeling like a naughty child I stepped into Superdrug and scanned the aisles for an ash blonde. There were hundreds of the things and all of the girls on the fronts of the packets looked fab. I started to get excited. I picked up a Loreal packet thinking yes I am worth it and ran back home locking myself in the bathroom. Half an hour later I was humming to myself stinking of peroxide fumes and merrily reading a magazine. An hour later I was having dicky fits in front of the bathroom mirror. My hair was the most horrendous brassy gingery yellow. I must have washed it twenty times to no avail. I was a mess. I can't begin to describe how bad this colour was. You know those women that are totally grey with wiry frizzy hair and they smoke like a chimney and it tarnishes their hair into this dirty yellowy colour? Mine was worse. I had to wait until Monday to rush back to my hairdressers thoroughly ashamed, humiliated beyond belief and explain what I'd actually done. T
                    hankfully my hairdresser rectified it. Giving me a stern telling off. Fact: Hairdressers have battled for years to get these products off the shelves and it is not because they can then get more business. These products are dreadful for your hair and eventually they will catch up with you. Fact: The girl who advised me to go the cheapo packet way confessed later that after a year of using the packet stuff her hair was in a frightful condition and she was having to go to a hair clinic every fortnight for reconstruction conditioners until her hair was strong enough to be rectified to her natural colour. They had done a test strand and 20 minutes later the strand had turned green and when ever so slightly stretched between the fingers immediately fell to bits in the hand. So please please don't do it. Even if the colour turns out okay it IS STILL damaging your hair. The ingredients are harmful not only to your hair but also your health and they are definitely definitely NOT THE SAME as the products used in professional salons. If you do decide to go blonde be prepared that it is going to cost you, if you can't afford it, don't do it. Its just not worth it.

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                      04.03.2001 21:51
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                      I have been dyeing my hair since I was about 12 or 13. I first had highlights in my hair which my friend and mum helped with. I think I would have probably had a bit of trouble doing my own first of all!! Over the past seven years I have died my hair just about every couple of months or so. Each time it has been a totally different colour and make of product. I have never had a problem personally with dyeing a different prodct over another one...but remember everyones hair is different! For the most part I died my hair dark red or black and the best makes for these are Boots Simply Natural (Deep Auburn and Ebony). These are relatively cheap, not very messy and don't fade quickly. They do make your hair feel really nice too! Anywho...I have found a few things that have made the process of dyeing my hair a bit easier and thought I would share them with you. First of all, it is very easy to dye your hair yourself if you are doing a total coverage. Most say apply to dry clean hair so if your hair is slighly dirty wash it before and leave to dry, or plan to do it the next day...although I normally do it later on!! Wear an old t-shirt and trousers. I have a dye-top which I have used most of the time and I normally get the mixture everywhere so I wear old trousers too!!! A lot of things say take out your jewellry. I can't say I have had any problems with hair "DYES" and my jewellrey, but don't take my word for it take it out if you want to. You should take it out for bleaching though. I normally manage to smother the tops of my ears with the product and found that my earings went dark. This was removed with jewellry cleaner but as you have to take them out to clean them you might as well take it out in the first place! Also remove rings/bracelets/necklaces. Brush your hair through thouroughly so that you haven't got any tangles. This also makes it easier if you want to brus
                      h it through so that you get it on every hair. Some dyes can be quite thick though so you might not be able to do this! Ok. Now we are dressed down for the occasion...apply some moisturising lotion or vaseline, on your forehead and the back of your neck, all around your hair line. This is really useful because you can be guaranteed you'll smear some on your forehead or neck and this will wipe off a lot easier than the hair dye itself!! Definatley wear gloves! Either the ones provided or a pair of rubber gloves. I find rubber gloves are quite a lot thicker and won't split and are definatley waterproof!!! Lay down some old towels in your bathroom. You can be guaranteed that the dye will go everywhere, either when you're applying it or when you are washing it off!! When you apply the mixture start at the roots and work outwards. The ends of my hair dont tend to be as vibrant a colour as the roots but that doesn't matter!! I find it easier to squeeze the mixture into my hands than apply it with the little bottle. This means you can get your fingers into your hair to "feel" where the dye is going. As I have long hair I find that if I put a bag over my hair and keep it up then I can move about and do other things whilst I'm waiting for the time to be up! Tip your head forward and make sure your hair hangs over. Place the bag on the back of your head and shape it like a turban. You can hold it together with pegs or tie it. This just keeps it out the way really but some dyes come with a cover anyway! A quick note here, before you wash the dye off, it might be useful to put some vaseline on the bath surface. This helps stop the dye from staining the bath! Apparently this should also be done if you use other types of dye, such as dyeing clothes or fabrics. When you wash it off you can be sure the water isn't going to run clear. I once leant over the bath for over 20 minutes once
                      and still there was dye coming out!!! I found that if you run the water until it is pretty clear i.e slightly tinted and you can't feel any significant patches of dye then it is ok to apply the conditioner provided. More dye will come out when you wash this off too! Obviously try to wash as much as is realistically possible out of your hair. You also might want to sleep on a towel over your pillow as in the night some dye might come out of your hair when you get hot. If the conditioner makes your hair feel funny, wash your hair with your usual shampoo and conditioner and it should feel "normal" again. I always tend to use shampoos for colour treated hair. I do change brands quite a lot but I remember Boots own stuff for colour treated was good. Cleaning yourself and your furniture up!! As I said before you should be able to wipe off the moisturiser/vaseline with any dye on it from your forehead/neck. If you notice some on your skin elsewhere, I find that if you wash with a facial wash then use a skin cleaner/toner this should remove most of it. Some do refuse to budge totally for a couple of days but make-up can cover that!!! If some has gotten onto your hands or arms diluted bleach will shift it. I once decided to do away with those naff plastic ones and had bright red hands! When I was cleaning the bath some of the dye shifted so I used a bleach dilute to get the rest off. Your bathroom can be cleaned up with some bleach and water. Towels and clothes though...you should use old stuff really so it shouldn't matter but if you have no old ones...consider these your old ones now!!! Otherwise I'm afraid it'll be a stain remover! Remember just putting water onto a blob of hair dye to try and remove it will make it worse. You wash dye out with water and end up with dyed hair....!!! If you are going for a different look it might be an idea to get a friend to help. I had stripey hair that needed
                      to be separated extremely evenly, then bleached or died black. I got my mate to help me do this as I knew if I did it it would come out very uneven!!! Ok...well thats enough from me! Hope this has helped! Feel free to leave comments with more tips if you like!

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                        07.02.2001 05:49
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                        Have you recently decided enough is enough and you want to go back to your natural colour instead of being a blonde????? And have you also found that you can't afford to go to the salon?? Well I was also in this position a few years ago and like many other women, I also couldn't afford the prices that salons ask these days. I also know of the fear of turning your hair a sort of muggy green colour instead of rich brown!! I, unlike others, had the advantage of working in a salon when I was sixteen so I was told a few secrets. Everybody has natural red in their hair, whether you have blonde or brown hair. Now all you have to remember is that if you have bleached your hair, you have stripped it of all the natural colour which means it hasn't any pigment left in it. Therefore if you put a brown colour on top of it, it will go green. Just as if you put a red straight on top of it it will go pink. If you want a rich brown colour then all you have to do is to put a red colour onto to your hair and then a rich brown colour. What this will do is to put the red back into your hair (remember about the natural red) and when you put the brown on it should look like a normal colour. You may have to apply more colour as time goes on so as to keep the colour "healthy". The best thing really though for hair that has been bleached is to start over again. In other words, have a short style and grow it again. This will insure stong, undamaged hair. Please note that this is just from my personal experience and from working in a hairdressers but I would still recommend going to the salon if you are unsure.

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                          10.01.2001 14:53
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                          I've have naturally medium brown hair and I've been dying it blonde for years now. I know it's so much cheaper to dye it yourself than go to the hairdressers, but if you want to go blonde I strongly advise you don't try to do it yourself. Even if you've been using hair colourants for years and have had no problems creating a good effect, when you try to go blonde it's a whole different ball game. Unless you've got naturally very light brown/blonde hair, finding a dye that is strong enough to turn it a nice blonde shade is no easy task. The colourants like 'Natea' and 'Belle colour' are simply not strong enough to make medium brown hair a lightish blonde, even if if says it does on the box and you leave it on for the maximum amount of time. If your hair is a medium brown and you use these dyes that have 'very light blonde' written on the box (not bleach), you are very likely to end up with a dark blonde colour with an orangey tone to it. Even the pre-lighteners didn't work too well for me and my hair isn't even that dark. Because of this I decided to bleach my hair to get it to the desired lightness. Word to the wise - DON'T DO IT! It is so difficult to know exactly how long to leave it on for, just a few minutes can make a BIG difference with the strong stuff like Jerome Russell. The instructions are hazy about how long to leave it to develop since everyone's hair is different so it's so hard to know. You could end up with the orangey blonde look, or you could fry your hair and end up with a really unnatural colour. You really should get a professional to do it. If you can't afford it ask if your salon does 'model nights'. They might be able to get a trainee to do your colour. It may sound risky, but they're going to be far more experienced at it than you are, and will almost certainly have someone watching their every move. Plus it'll cost you next to nothi
                          ng. Trust me on this one - I've had enough hair colourant disasters to last me a lifetime!

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