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LG CDRW 8x4x32

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7 Reviews

Access Time 100 m/sec | Buffer Size 2Mb | Mounting Type horizontal and vertical | 8xCD-R, 4xCD-RW, and 32-CD-ROM

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    7 Reviews
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      02.03.2002 19:22
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      This is not quite the product listed in the list but it is very similar so I thought I?d post it here! When I first considered purchasing this product, I was extremely unsure about the pros and cons of a CD-rewriter and whether the installation of the internal drive would prove to be a great hassle and problem! However my desire to have the ability to make CDs of all my favourite tracks overcame in the end and I went along to PC World to make the purchase, having waited a few weeks for the product to be in stock. Having purchased the CD-rewriter I now faced the most difficult task of all, installing it into my computer. Since I am only an amateur at computers I was quite afraid of messing the installation up and totally ruining my PC! However, the product cam packed with a handy installation guide which was straightforward to follow even for the novice types like me. In all it only took me a couple of hard-working hours to install before I was busy burning CD?s and admiring this fantastic bargain! The LG CD-Rewritable Recorder works extremely quickly. It has up to 40x read speeds, 10x copy speeds and 16x write speeds. The software accompanying it is extremely simple to use and creating CDs is not a problem! I have found great excitement with the purchase of my CD-rewriter and think it is a superb product to have on your computer. I would recommend this brand name to all, as it is extremely reliable and well worth the money paid.

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        08.08.2001 23:26
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        So it was my husband's birthday, and his going on and on (and on) about getting a CD-RW finally wore me down. Having a bit of space on the ol' credit card, I decided to toddle off down to PC World and see what was on offer, which happened to be the LG 8x4x32. This was handy because after reading the ops about it on this site I'd decided that looked like a good option anyway. Having parted with my £79.99, I brought my proud possession home, and decided that what I should really do was fit the beast for my computer illiterate husband as a surprise. (Aren't I nice? The answer is "Yes"...) I won't tell you all the ins and outs of the product, because other people have done it already, except to say that yes, it's a little stunner and I've got no complaints whatsoever. One thing I have noticed however, is that other opinions all say things like "easy to install" and "I was up and running within 20 minutes"! This was no doubt true, but the opinions also contain fatal words to this effect..."of course I'm an expert but it's so easy a beginner would be able to fit it..." So here's the point of view of a beginner: Although I am the computer literate one in the family, I haven't opened the case on a computer since I fitted some RAM about 3 years ago to my old computer. Since then, I have gained: a) a new, bigger computer b) a baby c) about a stone I only mention this as I am about to tell you how to fit your CD-RW drive, and item b) should NOT be involved. Item c) doesn't matter, but as I was mentioning it... But I digress. HOW TO FIT YOUR CD-RW --------------------- a) Open the box. Be immediately impressed and then slightly scared at all the manuals and little plastic bags full of screws and cables you don't recognise. Think "Hmmm, it's going to take me a week to read all those man
        uals" and decide to read them as you go along. Flip to the installation instructions and get to the part where it says "first take the case off your computer". b) Take the case off your computer. Then think "Bugger!" and turn your computer off. The inside of your computer, if you've never seen one before, is a big space surrounded by technical looking cables and stuff. Wonder why all the space is in the centre of the box and there's none around the area you're going to have to work in (the rack effort that already holds your CD-ROM drive and hard drive). Shrug and turn back to the instructions. c) Try popping out the blank bit of plastic which covers the hole you're going to put the CD-RW in. Struggle for about 5 minutes before realising you have to take the front of the case off too. Take the front of the case off and pop the little plastic bit out. Slide the CD-RW drive in, much as you would a car stereo. This is where the similarity ends. If you hear Chris Moyles coming through your CD-RW, immediately destroy it for it has been possessed by the devil. d) Now you have the CD-RW in the right place, feel pleased with yourself. Then turn back to the instructions which will say things like "attach the IDE lead to the motherboard and set the jumpers according to the table below. Up to 4 IDE leads can be configured per blah blah blah, consult the manual that came with your computer." e) Go "eh?" f) Curse the fact that your computer didn't come with manuals because your friend built it (the one you don't see any more). Wonder what jumpers are whilst pushing vague images of kangaroos in little woolly outfits to the back of your mind. Hope that the IDE lead is the big flat grey one that came with the package, same as the ones already attached to the hard drive and CD-ROM drive. Think "Hmmm, I'm not going to be defeated by this", and
        carry on regardless. g) Discover what and where the jumpers are. These are small bits of plastic which cover pins at the back of the CD-RW drive. Take the CD-RW out again because you can't see the jumpers once it's in. The manual will start talking about Master and Slave configurations, which have nothing to do with either 18th Century American Coffee Plantations, or S&M. In fact, it just seems to tell the computer which is the most important drive and therefore which should be given priority. (I could be wrong, but that's what it looks like to me). h) Here's where it gets technical. Inside the computer you'll see the CD-ROM drive and Hard drive already installed. These are connected together with a flat grey IDE lead which will then go down to a point on the motherboard. The hard drive will be set as the Master, and the CD-ROM will be the Slave. Leave them be! Do not be tempted to think "I'll just rearrange the CD-ROM because I'd prefer it to be in the other slot in the case" because you'll end up cocking the whole thing up, by forgetting which lead went where etc. etc. and why is it sparking and smoking now when I turn it on? i) The CDRW is going on a seperate IDE lead (the one that came with it), which will attach to a seperate point on the motherboard, next to where the grey lead from the Hard Drive/CD-ROM plugs in. Prise the little plastic jumper out of the back of the CDRW, and put it on the Master (M) pins. It's ever so ickle, so don't drop it and *definitely* don't drop it anywhere near a 1 year old as it will get eaten. According to those in the know, this will make it work better too, as it's on a seperate lead so it gets information quicker. Or something. j) Look back at the instructions which will talk about power leads. These are the bundled red, yellow and black wires that end in translucent white plugs. I had some spare ones in my compute
        r already, and you probably will too if it was advertised as "fully upgradeable". Otherwise you have to buy one. k) Slot the CDRW drive back into the case. Fiddle around trying to fit the power lead and IDE lead into the back of the CDRW. j) Break a nail and curse. Finally get the damn thing plugged in, and put the little fixing screws in. If you don't know where to put them, look at your CD-ROM drive and do it the same way. k) Drop the screws like a million times because they're so tiny and you've only got a flat head screw driver because you can't find the phillips head one. Swear. A lot. l) Finally get the case back on and turn the thing on. This is when I discovered that I'd set the Master and Slave thingy wrong, because I'd muddled up the CD-ROM, Hard Drive and CD-RW. My incessant fiddling had resulted in two Masters (CD-ROM and Hard Drive) on the same grey IDE lead. I don't profess to understand it all, but if you've ever tried to work for two people in the same company, you can see how confused my poor computer was. I then had to spend another hour trying to work out what the hell I'd done, and worrying in case the computer never booted up ever again. So that's why I decided to share my experiences with you. Now, when you turn your computer on, it should go "Woohoo! Thankyou for buying me a new bit of kit! Please allow me to copy all your discs for you and make backups of your data!" (Well, it'll probably just do what it usually does, but it'll be *thinking* those things.) And you will be able to because the software that comes with the LG is ridiculously easy. even for me. You can laugh if you like; you can call me a silly billy (or stronger), but you can't deny that for a beginner the inside of a computer can be a strange and scary place. And if my laughable failure prevents even one broke
        n nail or swallowed jumper plug, then my work here will be done...

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          17.06.2001 01:17

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          So far - so good! - Advantages: Cheap, works - Disadvantages: small buffer

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          04.06.2001 05:16

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          very good for first time user - Advantages: can be better for copying - Disadvantages: sometimes slow

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          18.05.2001 23:25
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          This is the first Dooyoo opinion that I have written for a few weeks, so if it is in any way lacking, please let me know and I will do my best to improve it. Anyway, enough of this waffle, I'll just get straight on with the juicy stuff. Having recently finished building my new PC, I decided that it was still lacking a certain something. I had no way of backing up my data apart from using the floppy drive, which is totally archaic anyway. The only realistic and suitable solution in my situation was to buy a CD Writer. I had been hoping to find a second-hand one of Ebay.co.uk so had waited a few weeks to see if I could find one at a decent price. It was soon apparent though that people on Ebay are often willing to spend more than is strictly required on most items, so I decided to look elsewhere. Eventually, I received an advert in the post from Makro, a large Wholesaler of products (not just computer stuff) who had this CD Writer on special offer for the next 2 weeks. The price listed was £59.99 + V.A.T. and this worked out to be about £20 cheaper than most other places I had looked. Just to emphasise how good an offer this was; all of these CD Writers had sold out within 24 hours. The CD Writer itself came in a nice fully boxed kit complete with the drive, IDE cable, CD Audio cable, mounting screws, manuals and all of the relevant software. This is particularly nice to see because most CD Writers within this price range are normally just bare drives without any software or proper documentation. The specifications of the drive are very impressive for the price; 8x write, 4x re-write and a maximum 32 speed read. These are all maximum figures and your computer may not be able to keep up, which I will discuss later in this opinion. The drive itself is attractive although the colour didn't quite match my case, or my other CD drive. This isn't a major issue and obviously it doesn't have any effect on how the drive performs. On the front f
          ascia, there is a headphone socket, volume control, read LED, write LED, Play/Skip track button and an eject button. One feature that LG drives have that a lot of other manufacturers don't include is a little manual eject mechanism in the case of power or drive failure. All you have to do is put a pointy object into a little hole on the front of the fascia and the drive tray will pop out slightly, allowing you to retrieve your CD. Installation of the drive couldn't have been much easier. Due to the fact that I have a Full Tower case, which is massive, I had some minor problems with cabling but this was quickly sorted out. The supplied cable is of normal length, but the problem was that I wanted to put the CD Writer in the top drive bay of my case, but the cable wasn't long enough. A slightly longer replacement cable was needed, although this did set me back about £10 from a specialist. The drive just slotted into the empty drive bay and all I had to do was screw it in. Then I just connected the power, IDE and CD audio cables to the back of the drive and it was all up and running. One thing to not before installing the drive is to make sure that you have the jumpers configured correctly. With CD Writers it is advisable to have the device set up as the master drive on the secondary IDE channel because this helps to ensure a constant supply of uninterrupted data to the drive. This is all clearly explained in the manual though, so it is all very easy. Once installed it's just a case of installing the CD writing software from within Windows. The software supplied with this drive is Adaptec East CD Creator and Direct CD, both of which are very good, although not quite as good as Nero in my opinion. It's a pleasant surprise to note that a full manual is supplied with the software rather than just an online version. This makes it easy to reference in you do run into any problems. On my PC there were no problems however and I had my firs
          t CD being written within 10 minutes. The ease of use was very good with this drive. Even though I am quite experienced at upgrading and building PCs, I think that a beginner could have added this drive to their machine with consumate ease and a bit of common sense. The software is all incredibly easy to use too, so I would certainly recommend this package to someone who is fairly new to PCs. My only criticism with this CD writer is that it doesn't support the latest 'Burn-proof' technology. This technology basically eliminates the curse of CD writers; buffer underruns. A buffer underrun is when the CD Writer isn't supplied with enough data quickly enough and the data buffer on the drive itself empties. Because of the technology used to write CDs, this always used to mean that in this situation, the CD would have to stop recording and would become corrupted. This would lead to a totally useless CD that didn't have all the data on that you needed. In recent months however, new technology has arrived which is supposed to prevent buffer underruns from occurring. Sadly though, this drive doesn't have this technology incorporated into it. On my PC (Duron 850) I have experienced one buffer underrun CD whilst having this drive which is much lower than I've experienced with other drives. This is is part thanks to the generous 2mb buffer that the drive has. To write a CD at 8x you will need to leave the PC unused whilst the writing process is going on, or else the chance of buffer underruns is increased. This means that you should close down all programs other than the CD writing software and disable screensavers and power saving features. This may seem to be a pain, but in the long run it's much better than having a collection of toasted CDs. At this price range, it is difficult to imagine a manufacturer managing to cram any more specifications into the machine so I can't really criticise it too much for not having Burn-
          proof technology. The uses for a drive like this are plentiful. You can back up any data that you have, burn your own music CDs (using uncopyrighted material, of course) and make copies of any uncopyrighted CDs that you already have. Of course, there's nothing to stop you from copying copyrighted CDs, but don't be surprised when the men in suits start knocking on your door. In conclusion, I would heartily recommend this CD writer to anyone with an interest in writing their own CDs. It doesn't matter whether you're a PC novice or an expert, this drive has enough features to keep you interested, whilst maintaining excellent simplicity. For £59 I got a bargain, but I think that from most online retailers it's selling for about £80, which is still a good £20 cheaper than most of its competitors. If you do buy this CD writer, I can't see you being a disgruntled customer. *Just as a little extra note, I have had no difficulty with this drive on any types of recordable media yet, even cheapo stuff from computer fairs, which only makes it a more attractive proposition.

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            18.03.2001 01:10
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            I actually wrote this opinion a while ago, but I posted it in the wrong category, so it was taken off. However, now that there is a proper category for it I've posted it back on. The Review. I've been after a CD-RW drive for ages now, but most of them seem to be really expensive. So I thought to myself say I could use my dooyoo miles, and a bit of cash to purchase one. The first thing I did was visit the Dixons and PC World website. Guess what? They sell LG CD-RW drives for under £100, well I was really excited and couldn't wait for my vouchers to come. The big day come last week, and I drove straight to Dixons to get my drive. The drive seems pretty good for most peoples needs, it has. 4X record. 4X Rewrite 32X Read. It requires an IDE interface, and you need a 233mhz processor and 32MB of ram, you also need to be running Windows 95/98. You are also supplied with the necessary cables and wires. The only problem is that I've never done any upgrading to my computer, I've never even taken the back off. Therefore, I was a bit nervous about fitting the drive. I followed the books instructions, it said I could connect two drives. Nevertheless, after turning the computer on, nothing happened, both drives had disappeared from Windows. At this point, I was wishing I never bought the thing. Then I had an idea, say I took out the old drive and connected the new drive, in exactly the same way as the old drive. I did this, and bingo it worked first time. Personally, the instructions for this drive are rubbish. This CD-RW drive will still run games and photo CD's etc, so I would recommend taking out your old drive. I haven't had the drive long enough to comment on reliability. But I have burnt two CD-R's and I've used a CD-RW disk to store data. On all three occasions the drive performed efficiently, and I didn't e
            xperience problems. To record a 74-min CD it took approximately 20 minutes, which is fairly fast for a budget drive. The drive is also supplied with Adaptec Easy CD creator. This software is really basic but has quite a few good features, such as jewel case templates, an audio and data wizard. The only downfall is that it doesn't decode MP3's to Wav. You can combat this problem by downloading a freeware version of cool decode. Which is available from the Znet library and only takes 5 minutes to download. For £99, this is real bargain, and I would urge you to hurry down to PC World or Dixons and get yours now, before they run out. Update. I've had this drive for approximately three months now, and in that time I have made lots of music CD's, I've stored data, and I've even compiled my own Sega megadrive and ZX Spectrum emulaters with tons of games to go with it. Not once had any CD ever gone wrong, I don't bother with the test facility and just press the create CD button, and my CD's come out perfect everytime. This is one fantastic CD-RW, I would highly recommend to to anyone who is considering buying a drive. Also PC World have reduced this drive to a mere £89.99. What a bargain.

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              31.01.2001 04:19
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              I couldn't decided to buy the LG, Sony or HP CD writer. Many people said HP because it is well known for its CD writers. I decided to go for LG as this was the cheapest of the 3 & have no regrets so far. The Adaptec software supplied with the writer did not work properly. It took 20 minutes to prepare the data before starting to write. I then tried Nero which was excellent. It started to write straight away without any delay. Speed is approximately 9 minutes for a full capacity CD. I heard from another review that this writer fails to burn at it's stated 8x but I've had no problem at writing at this speed. I am glad I bought this brand rather than be safe & pay the extra for the HP or Sony for better known brands.

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