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Jobs whilst you are a student

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  • could be out clubbing.
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      19.11.2013 13:47

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      go for it!

      During my student days I was a children's train driver, paperboy, fence installer, sold betterware products, worked in fast food, etc. these days the competition is even more fierce for jobs, but there are opportunities for the savvy student out there. Much can be completed online, but the better paid employment usually involves you getting up and going out there to work. as ever, contacts are important, and don't be afraid to ask. People appreciate a hard worker, and if you are out there, asking for work then it will get noticed and work can come your way. Bear in mind the long term too. If you can turn your student job into a long term career that is great, especially if your studies can improve the chances of promotion, There you go folks, I hope this helps. I am a master at getting jobs, since finishing studies I have worked full time and continued to do extra work on top. best regards

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      02.04.2009 12:59
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      Have a blast!

      So even though the university says "you shouldnt work while your are studyig, concentrate on your studies, loans and other help from the financial department will help you out" how unrealistic?! Im a student and I am in debt. I started a Nursing course when I left school stuck at for a while and then before they chucked me out for not working very hard I left (at this point with around £5500 of debt). I then started a brand new degree, problem was I had to pay my tuition fees this time round (I am from Scotland so usually SAAS pay these for us), I have bills coming out my ears from credit cards (worst idea ever!), trying to pay my overdraft and rent to my parents (harsh!), my phone and my social life (virtually non existant just now!) Advice... Make a budget, what do you NEED to make to cover you for the month, monthly budgets are so much easier to use than working out a yearly plan although this can be helpful if you want to see how much you are paying/earning etc. Set yourself an allowance for the week, I usually go for £20 a week when Im skint which is satisfactory and £30 - £40 when I am a bit better off (which is not very often!) A job... I work in a shop, which is brilliant. I am contracted to 14 hours per week only on weekends (rotation sometimes I work in the morning, sometimes night and every third week a weekend off!)! I think the key is finding a weekend job which offers overtime. Overtime is a great way to boost your wage but also its YOUR choice. Sometimes when I have a quiet week at uni I work 30 hours, this week due to having lots of assessments and studying to do I am sticking to my basic hours. Its great to have the choice. Boosting income doesnt need to be hard work though and there are other ways to boost income without working every hour god sends. 1. Amazon - brilliant place to buy and sell your old uni boooks. I advise selling them just after Christmas, and just before the uni starts back after summer holidays this is the best way to get the highest price :) But for buying books, buy right in the middle of the summer holidays...not many other people will be buying books at that time. Otherwise borrow from the library and spend nothing! 2. Do bootsales. Sounds geeky but its a brilliant way to get money for a night out. Usually me and my sister make around £100 so £50 each for selling old rubbish? not a bad mornings work! 3. EBAY!!! Fantastic site, put anything you want on it and earn a bit of cash. Bit of a pain going to the post office but still worth it in the end when you transfer a wad of cash to your bank account! 4. Take full advantage of STUDENT DISCOUNTS - my favourite word! And probably the best thing since sliced bread!! Enjoy student life. And by taking care of your money and using some of the things listed above your income can be upped easily and seinsibly without doing alot of work during term time!

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        26.07.2002 01:34
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        Working while being a student is an important decision, which most students choose to opt for. Because of the strain of the economy on students (student loans and debts etc), students often find themselves against their will working in part-time employment while still keeping afloat at university. If the thought of getting out of debt is enough incentive then there is always the fact that you will have extra pocket money to spend so the work hard play hard motto truly applies here. Most people when entering university are rather shy due to the fact that old contacts from their previous college may not attend school. Students are subjected to the whole making friends process all over again. With a part-time job the opportunity arises to make friends at work that may be in a similar position to you. In addition there is also the chance to make important contacts in a certain industry for use when you have graduated. It is recommended that students interested in taking up part-time jobs should enter an industry similar to the one that they are studying for. However although this is beneficial, I also believe that any industry that teaches students important techniques and skill is a job worth taking, if not to develop the student as a worker then as a human being. Of course there are down sides to getting a part time job, for instance, there is always the possibility that the job may be strenuous, this will exhaust you and make you less efficient during lectures. Manual labour is usually the suspect for this kind of fatigue. In addition, as with any job in later life there is always the feeling that you are being left out. Imagine the scenario, your friends are going to a club and you are working that night, this can become very frustrating and rifts between you and your friends can occur. It must be noted that the jobs that are available are usually low paying jobs especially when you are a student. It is custom for emplo yers to pay under 21’s the minimum wage which can become very frustrating when you find yourself toiling away in the hot back kitchen of a restaurant for a couple of quid when you could be out with your friends. The most threatening downfall of working as a student is probably the fact that the jobs are usually very uninspiring and dull. Now although this usually makes you frustrated and bored it also great incentive for university. You realise that in order to survive a fate of working in this place for the rest of your life then you require the appropriate degrees and honours. There are many ways to get a job as a student. The University job shop is an excellent option. This is basically an agency type organisation, which allows students to fill in forms and applications and find work through them. The important thing to remember here is that the University Job shop is run by students for students and the employers who usually sign up for the service are realistic and understand your situation and the hours that are convenient for you. In addition to this, you are protected by the University from any unfair or illegal treatment at work. However, the money that these jobs often pay are peanuts, around £3.50 and the work is usually temporary or for special occasions. The newspaper is an excellent place to look for a job. Most newspapers will feature jobs that employers have listed due to vacancies at their businesses. Simply phone up as soon as possible and you are likely to be called in for an interview. There are agencies apart from the University Job Shop; for instance, Pertemps is an agency, which I personally use. Although they insist that you have a car or some form of regular transport, they pay highly for students, around £6.00 and continuously provide work for you as a lot of businesses sign up for their services. However, you are likely to find yourself working in a different place every couple of days. T here is a range of differing jobs available for students which agencies provide, the most common are manual labour, data entry, bar tending, shop assistant and carer. Personally I prefer carer because it pays highly and in addition most agencies will train you thus giving you certain qualifications. As a bonus, it is regular and you have a sense of security when it comes to regular income. Manual labour is not something, which I would advise for students. I have tried this in the past and discovered that I was usually physically exhausted for days after. Although pay is usually high, working conditions are disgraceful (you might find yourself in a steamy boiler room) and you will discover that your class work suffers as a consequence. Data entry is possibly the least satisfying of all the jobs. Not only is it tedious but also unrewarding. You may find yourself with a four-hour task of just clicking on PC screens and entering numbers at nausea. Bar tending and shop assistant are two jobs, which allow you to continuously meet new people and interact with the community. Although the pay is not brilliant, the hours are usually flexible depending on how busy the place is and you will usually find other students from campus working in the same building as you. It is essential to make a decision on working before University starts otherwise you may find that by the time you have made up your mind, all the best jobs are already taken. Whatever job you choose to pursue, just remember that it essential you stay positive and that as a University Student it is unlikely that you will have to do a similar job for the rest of your life.

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          17.06.2002 19:01
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          • "could be out clubbing."

          Reasons why working part time is a good idea: - Extra cash - The thought of starting full time work with several thousands pounds worth of debt is enough to get many students working part time alongside their studies. You will get experience of handling and making your own money, plus have more money to spend on whatever your heart desires. -Meet people - It can be hard to meet people when at university if you don't want to join a zillion societies. Certain jobs such as bar/waitressing and shop work are full of students so you will meet lots of new people, hopefully make some new friends and enhance your social life. -Work Experience - Ideally you should do some work related to your degree, however it is not always easy to get interesting paid work with so much competition. But any job teaches you important skills and gains you a reference (hopefully). When you leave uni and start looking for a job, a year or so of a part time job will look a lot more impressive than 3 years of bumming around getting drunk. *Reasons why working is a bad idea:* If you go to uni away from your home town it can be difficult to find a flexible job. I wanted to work when I was in Cardiff but also wanted to go home regularly which was not possible. Temping or casual work is a possibility if you want to work but don't want to be tied down to your university town. - May affect your studies - Oxford University does not allow their students to work any more than 6 hours per week in term time (which isn't really worth doing at all). Other universities insist, or strongly recommend that students work no more than 16 hours per week. If you are working more than that it is a tough job to juggle your studies with the responsibilities of your job. It should not really be necessary to work more than 16 hours a week as even 16 hours at minimum wage works out at over £65 a week. If you are in your f inal year or have exams coming up it is not a good idea to work, but if you must, stick to only a few hours a week. There is no point going to uni for 3 or more years only to fail because you were working too many hours in a job rather than studying. Although it can be a struggle financially, think about the earning potential you will have with a good degree. -Difficult Employers - It can be hard to find a kind, understanding boss. You need someone who will be flexible and let you change shifts if you have a test the next day, or you are starring in a play/playing in a match. Managers are not really renowned for being kind beings and might sack you if you take the biscuit. -Missing Out? - Look at all the opportunities you have in your time at university- societies, campaigning, writing for the student newspaper, watching This Morning-if you are out working you are limiting the time you have to do all of these! I do not think this is an issue though as you can balance a part time job with other activities if you are organised. -Low Pay - You are not going to be qualified for any really well paid jobs until you graduate. As a student you are likely to be on minimum wage (£4.10 for over 21's and a disgusting £3.50 for 18-21 year olds although many employees will pay £4.10 to all over 18's) or maybe a bit more. Is it really worth all those hours of slaving away for the pathetic pittance you get? It is VERY irritating to work in a pub or restaurant and realise that one drink costs you an hour of your time in work. -Dull Jobs - You might be lucky and find a job you really enjoy such as working in a nursery if you like children. The rest of us will continue to moan about our jobs, dread going in and will the hours away while there. This depends on your personality- some people do not mind doing the same task over and over again while others would be crazy. If you get on with the people you work with and are treated with respect you will be more able to cope with boring tasks, but if you hate them all and are treated like a skivvy you won't last long. A good point about working in a dull job that you hate, is that you appreciate studying as you use your brain, and it makes you realise that you need to get your degree and never ever do such a rubbish job again. Then in 10 years you might be a manager, remember how much you hated your shop job and treat your employees with respect so they work well. It's all education and life experience! *How do I get a Job?* -University Job Shops - Many universities have job shops run by the student union. These are job agencies designed for and run by students. You will probably have to go in, fill in an application form and maybe have an interview before they will place you in any job. Many of the jobs will be temporary or for special events such as promotions or conferences at the university. You will have your rights protected as you are working for the university and the employees actually want students so tend to by sympathetic to their needs. Ask in your student union if they run a job shop and join if you are looking for work. Join in your first week and get in first. If you are at a campus university such as Keele or Lancaster there will be more competition for the jobs so present yourself in the best possible way. -Newspaper - Local newspapers will usually have a "job" day (In Birmingham it's Thursday) with all the vacancies listed in the paper. On this day get the paper as soon as you can and phone up any prospective jobs. Avoid ones that are vague about what the actual job is and sound too good to be true because they are (they are most likely to be door to door sales jobs with no pay, just commission). -Agencies - Similar to the uni job shop, these will be in the city centre and on the high street and include big names like Pertemps and Kellys, as well as smaller local agencies. Go in and book an interview. Some of them may not want to take students on as they only have full time vacancies but ask anyway. Many agencies now allow you to join online although it is very likely they will still phone you for an interview. Try: www.reed.co.uk www.pertemps.co.uk www.kellys.co.uk -Online Searches - There are a number of websites devoted to jobs for students. Try: www.snapajob.com www.hotrecruit.com www.thebigchoice.com www.activate.com.uk *Which Job?* -Data Entry - This is the kind of job you are likely to get from an agency. Pay will be around £5 an hour for sitting in front of a PC and entering numbers or details repeatedly. Full time it is a terrible job which makes you feel like a robot, but part time it is ok, you get on with the work on your own and may be able to listen to a personal stereo. It's not exactly a career, but can get you other job openings within the company and is an easy way of making money. -Bar Work - You go home stinking of lager, sticky and you are always working on a Friday and Saturday night, or whenever people are going clubbing. But you can have a good laugh in a relaxed environment, listen to some good music and pick up quite a few tips (or drinks). It depends on the pub in question, and on you- if you can give as good as you get then go for it. Most pub jobs are got by simply going in and asking. -Waiting - Can you stay calm when being yelled at? Can you grit your teeth when you have complaints coming from every direction? Pay for waiting staff is usually low, but may be more if you can do silver service or are working somewhere posh. If you look smart and smile sweetly you can make a lot in tips. You may get free meals or at least reduced, so although your feet will kill and you will curse the customers ( in private), you shouldn't go hungry and will gain useful customer service experience. And you will be nice to waiting staff for the rest of your life because you know what it's like! -Shop assistant - Can be terrible, can be ok, depends on the shop. The hours should be reasonable and pay can range from minimum wage to fairly good if you are working in an expensive shop in the city centre. Look in shop windows and ask friends if they know which shops are recruiting to get a job in a shop. *Interesting and Fun Jobs* Few and far between, but here are a few ideas: Children's party organiser, starting your own company (I have a few ideas but get your own!), English tuition, GCSE tuition for local children. Me: I am 20 soon and have been a barmaid (3 times), hotel assistant, waitress, repographics assitant, glass collecter, kitchen assistant, cook, childrens group leader, and data entry clerk. And I still have a minimum of three years to go of being a student so I think I am pretty qualified to write about jobs as a student!

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            14.03.2002 17:05
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            I was once a student y’know. Less than ten years ago but far enough back to remember maintenance grants (albeit pretty tiny by then) and a time when tuition fees were paid for. I came out of uni debt-free which is nigh on impossible now but lets look at some ways to ease the financial pain of being a student in the 21-st century under the benign (ha!) gaze of Tony Blair’s government. ***Work on Campus***. Well, this is probably the first place to start looking. There are lots of potential jobs in the university itself. You could try the canteen. Lots of my friends worked in the kitchens in halls, serving up food, and clearing plates. Advantages: Well, you don’t have miles to travel to get to work, assuming you’re living on campus. It provides some beer money at the end of the week. You can give extra big helpings to people that you fancy and um, spit in the food of those you don’t. (I’m sure this never happens really, but y’know, it could be looked upon as a perk of the job, but only if you really don’t like the person and they’ve been really mean to you and wronged you big time in some way and nearly ruined your whole life. You decide.). Disadvantages: You probably have to wear a hat or worse, a hairnet, thus ruining any chances you had with that person you’ve just doled out huge helpings to. You have to clear up after people who think you might, just might, have spat in their tea – you think they’re going to leave their tray tidy for you? Do you now? If you can get a job in the student union bar then you really ought to be laughing. Think about it: You’re in the bar. And you’re getting paid for it. True, it’s not very much. And you probably can’t get legless in quite the same spectacular fashion as if you were a punter. And you might have to actually do some work like pull the odd pint now and again. But it’s not difficult. You’re in a student union bar, all anyone wants to drink is beer, its not like you’re going to get asked to make up a Martini, though it would be helpful to know what snakebite is. I worked in our student union bar in my final year and it was one of the best jobs I ever had, precisely because it didn’t feel like a job. I never worked the 11am-3pm shift because it was too early (!) and incorporated the lunchtime rush. The 3-7pm slot was a more laid back affair, with students coming in for a quick pint between lectures, and small pockets of people intent on getting drunk. Over the four hours I’d chat with everyone who came in, watch MTV in the corner and drink as much Coke as I could (because it was free, so I felt I ought to). I’d heat up pizzas for hungry punters and invariably be agony aunt to some drink-sodden, wretched fool at the bar and I’d take heart that however bad my degree/love life/ financial state was, someone else always had it a whole lot worse. I also worked an evening shift (7-11pm) on a Wednesday night. This would be the evening when all the sport clubs, returning from various matches and fixtures, would head to the union en masse. One group of males in particular would always be there, ever so rowdy, not at all tiresome – yeah right! – with their drinking games and bawdy songs, not to mention the puking, mooning and peeing into pint glasses. Yep, it was the rugby team, bain of my life, or Wednesday nights at least. If you are a rugby player you might take offence at reading this but I say go down your pint and turn the glass upside down on your head, you sorry sod, and be off with you. This was supposed to be an op on jobs for students, and I’ve been waylaid by the uncomfortable memory of hairy backsides tumbling to the floor as the table beneath their mooning extravaganza gives way under their collective weight. Advantages to working in the bar: You get to see your friends while you’r e working and you’ll probably make lots of new friends too, it’s a good way of meeting people. Free drinks. (mostly of the soft variety, but the opportunity is always there to stick a double in that Coke you’re drinking…) Disadvantages: Drunken people. Especially rugby players. The other job I had in my final year was in one of the administration offices where I had the exciting prospect of stuffing envelopes. However, I did get paid £5.25 an hour for it, in comparison to just £3 an hour in the bar. None of these jobs are likely to be advertised, you’ll have to get in quick at the start of the academic year and be prepared to ask around all the various departments, to strike lucky. Opportunities off campus are endless of course and you know what shops and businesses are close to you and which of them take on casual staff. There are certain things to consider though. You need a job that won’t conflict with your studies. It’s all very well working long hours and making plenty of money but if your course is suffering as a result then it’s probably not worth it, especially if your social life, which should be a vital part of being a student, starts to suffer too. So be it the local supermarket or Pizza Hut, telesales or data entry in an office, it ought to be flexible to fit in with your studies. There’s another thing to consider as well. I’ve been looking at jobs just solely from the perspective of making a little extra money to put in your pocket. But, unlike me, you may not be so blinded by another night out on the town, and instead are thinking ahead to the future, and the first steps in your career, when what you have down on your CV may make all the difference. In that case you’re not fussed about my op, you’ll be looking for unpaid placements in your chosen field, hoping prospective employers will be impressed. Whatever you choose to do, try and make it fun. Go od luck y’all.

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              07.03.2002 03:23
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              • "And another"

              Well, it is a long time since I was a student, but since others are writing about their experiences, then why shouldn't I do so? That is one of the prime advantages of DooYoo as far as I am concerned - another opportunity to put down in writing part of our very own autobiography. OK, this may not meet with the 'approval' of some, that I have accused of having ‘schoolteachery’ minds (dig-dig lol) and seem to wish to see only short succinct and purely relevant reviews on the site. Anyone who has studied history in even its more rudimentary taught form should have got the message that we should be able to LEARN lessons from ‘history’. However, the general feature of autobiography is often that the writer wants to say “Don’t do as I did”. I worked during school and university vacations and (for a period) at weekends over an 8 year period and I reckon that I gained a lot from the experience. Almost all this experience took place in and around the small sea-side town of Barry in South Wales. I reckon that there were few places to beat it during my youth during the 1950's and 1960's. Bit of a 'dump' now though (as the few accounts of “Barry” on DooYoo will confirm)..... For the period whilst I was at University (1963 to 1966), we were in the halcyon days when students had free tuition and everyone had at least something in the way of a Maintenance grant. There were supposed to be 'parental contributions' and I 'lost' about 10% of the grant each year that was NOT made up by my parents. However, I still finished my 3 years at University free from debt and indeed with a couple of hundred pounds in savings - and THAT was a time when a new Mini was about £450 ... and petrol 22 pence a gallon ..... My grants for those 3 years amounted to approximately £280, £300, £330. But I augmented it each year by about £30 by making 'extra trav elling expenses' claims – all perfectly legal, I should add .... But, hell!! When you are a teenager-to-21, life is a bottomless pit as far as money-requirements are concerned. But I am so pleased that I never had to resort to finding paid employment during term time, as many students today have to (and still finish up with a debt mountain). Perhaps I should make the point that 'loans' were not an option in my day. OK you just MIGHT have been able to arrange a temporary over-draft from the Bank, but credit was not as easily come by. So you either worked when you could or went thirsty - although some managed to sponge off their parents during the vacations (silly people, I thought - so many unrepeatable opportunities missed). 'The Mighty Atom Cafe' I started employment mighty early, at the age of 13, in the school Whitsun and summer holidays in 1958, at 'The Mighty Atom Cafe' on the West Promenade (facing the sandy beach) at Barry Island. I just went there myself - it always looked a friendly place - and was sent to see the owner who took me on. I recall the date well - 10th May 1958, and I started that next weekend, making/selling candy floss and selling ice cream to the day-trippers, mostly from the Rhondda Valleys. They came down in their hordes on 'special express trains' (all STEAM!!!!!), starting to arrive at 10 am and mostly leaving from about 5 pm. The cafe also sold fish & chips and 'pots of tea for the beach'. I worked for the weekends up to Whitsun, all Whitsun week, then the weekends until the summer holidays, and then the 6 weeks of the holiday. I was paid one shilling and thruppence an hour (6 pence in 'new money'), so that 6 days' work provided £3. Now my 'pocket money' at that time was about 30 pence a week, so that was riches indeed ! There was even the possibility of 'over-time', working the evening fish & chips trade at 'The Rock Cafe' also owned by the same family – the Fulgoni family - but, after 8 hours, I was generally too 'knackered' to consider this. The cafe was named 'The Mighty Atom' by its original owner, the famous Welsh World Boxing Champion Jimmy Wilde (whose nick-name was 'The Mighty Atom' - see my Review), a gentle lovely old man in my days who still visited the cafe occasionally. Learned a lot from that early experience. For example those who looked like 'sweet old dears' were rarely 'sweet little old ladies' at work, but usually "right-miserable-old–ratbags", and that "life-ain't-always-fair", so that YOU could be blamed for the sins of others. Oh and I learned how to enter 'licensed premises' for the first time, learning the pleasure to be found in consuming 'Hancock's Ales'. Cost from one shilling and thruppence a pint (oh Joy! – an hour’s work for a pint!!!). Forte Ice Cream Parlour The following summer I 'moved up' in society and sold ice cream from one of the two Forte Ice Cream Parlours facing the main road through Barry Island. Pay also moved up to two shillings an hour (10 pence). The 'Parlours' were owned and run by three members of an off-shoot of the famous Forte family, and they were grand guys. Tony & Dino were the sons of the 'old man' who was the brother of Sir Charles Forte. Dino was a real Luigi-type 'playboy', then running a maroon Coombes-Tuned Mk 2 Jaguar 3.8 (the 'Inspector Morse'-style car but with wire wheels and oodles of performance). Dino appointed all the part-time waitress staff, and he had a keen eye for 'talent'. The main 'Parlour' where I worked was the preferred venue of the 'Fairground owners' set, so the Olivers' and the Collins' families were in often. I recall the 'showman' Ton y Oliver driving around in a pre-war Mercedes SSK fixed-head coupe (with enormous exhausts snaking out of the sides of the bonnet – the sort that would make in excess of a million pounds now at auction). I remember him trying to sell it to Dino for £400 - a little less than the cost of the (then) new-fangled Austin Mini. Oh I wished ..... A much less tiring job. The ice cream was made on the premises and occasionally I helped out in the factory which was supervised by 'the old man'.. I tasted 'real coffee' for the first time there, and soon became hooked on 'expresso'. I became very adept at turning out Knickerbocker Glories, Nut Sundaes and 'North Poles' and other fancy ice cream concoctions and my true 'potential' was recognised. Thus, at the end of the summer, I was asked if I would work on weekends throughout the year. The parlour was open throughout the year, and walkers on the beach would call in for a coffee, biscuit (and sometimes ice cream), so that it became quite busy at the weekends, particularly Sundays. Apart from the pocket-money augmenting, it was very useful in that a never-ending series of young ladies were employed as part-time waitresses.... I soon started the most important pass-time of my teenage years as a 'serial romantic'. I worked there for almost two years...... <sigh> 'Distillers Plastics' My father worked as a Plant Supervisor at DCL in their factory producing PVC and other plastics. By the time I was 16, I had decided that I wanted to study Chemistry at University, so that a Summer placement in the Quality Control Laboratories was arranged for me. This was real work, working as an assistant to shift chemists and new graduates doing research into new and improved methods of analysis. A new plastic was being developed ('ABS' – acrylonitrile/butadiene/Styrene co-polymer), and I played a part in perfecting a routine me thod for determining residual Styrene monomer in the latex..... The Shift Chemists were a 'rum lot', soon introducing me to the dangers of 'over-indulgence' in alcoholic beverages. I also learned of the high regard that my father was held in throughout the company. When I was 5 years' old, I recalled him being in hospital and saying that he had been “gassed”. He recovered and I thought little more about it. Whilst working in the Laboratory, two guys would come in from the 'plant' most days with samples for analysis. They told me that my Dad had saved the lives of two workers at that time by going twice into a 'Poly' (a large tank where the plastic was polymerised) where two workers had been over-come by fumes. He went in without using the cumbersome breathing apparatus (time being of the 'essence') and made the correct decision to take out the unconscious guy before the semi-conscious one, otherwise that one would have surely died. After he brought out the second guy, my Dad collapsed and was taken to hospital with the other two. Typically, the company had hushed things up (even 'disciplining' my father for not adhering to the safety rules) and sacked the two men. I will admit to viewing 'the old bu**er' with a new respect from then on. The following summer I worked in the Research Laboratory, where the work was much less inspiring. I was examining plastics made by other companies, trying to establish which plasticisers and additives they used. I tried out a number of separation techniques, producing residues that were sent to a specialist Laboratory on site where Spectroscopy and Gas-Chromatography were used to 'identify' what was in the residues. The problem was that the results were usually “rubbish”. Specimen ‘A’ would be an extract, which would be ‘separated’ into two components ‘B’ and R 16;C’. It seemed that any relationship between ‘A’ and ‘B/C’ were purely coincidental (!). Then the following Xmas, I was asked back to the QC Laboratory because they were 'short-staffed'. The ABS plastic was now in production, and they were short of staff skilled enough to carry out the 'residuals' determinations, and the testing of the plastic itself. The testing of the plastic required the plastic powder prepared from the latex to be 'milled' in a hot-roller machine. I then found out why they were 'short-staffed'. A dozen workers were 'off-sick' with dermatitis. This had been kept quiet (even my father had not heard about it – when he was made aware of it, by me, he was furious !). I milled about a dozen sheets – that was sufficient to give a strong skin reaction with the insides of my fingers starting to display the characteristic reddening and skin peeling. Then I refused to do more, so that after just a week and a half, I never darkened the portals of DCL again. Later the factory was sold to British Petroleum (BP). Oh, and one of the Senior Assistants in the QC laboratory who I had assisted right at the start eventually became a Director of BP Chemicals. Strange how life works out for some people. He was not highly qualified (HNC), but had a certain pragmatic attitude to work... Taxi Sir ? The day after I left DCL, I was approached by a friend whose father owned a taxi company in Barry and they were VERY short of drivers. So I was 'engaged'. A bit like 'mini-cabs' today – no meters, just agreed fares for specific journeys. The cars were Austin Cambridges with two Vanden Plas Princess (a 3 litre and a 4 litre R – with a Rolls Royce engine). I daren't think what the insurance premiums would be today. I was only 17 .... Quite enjoyed that experience.... ‘Bowles-the-Quarry’ (1) As soon as my A level examinations were coming to an end, I was out job-hunting. Tried to get a job van-driving, aerial erection, floor-laying ... no luck. Then I was driving past the Quarry at Dinas Powis just outside Barry when I saw a sign “Workers Wanted”, so I stopped and was engaged to start 4 days later as a 'Breeze-Block-Maker'. The limestone quarry was owned by the Bowles family, producing limestone chippings, some of which were made into concrete-breeze blocks. The traffic announcer on Radio 2 in the mornings, Lynn Bowles, is part of that family (yes, I am a mine of useless information !). I made about 200 of these blocks each day. Tedious work, and I gave a week's notice after just one week. On the Buses You see, the day after agreeing to start at the quarry, I decided to try for one of the 'plum' summer jobs in Barry – working as a bus conductor. You had to apply at the offices at just the right time and I just happened to be calling at the office ‘at just the right time’. The Western Welsh Omnibus Company operated services to and from Cardiff and Penarth and the Vale of Glamorgan. During the summer the good burghers of Barry (and the bad 'uns) made their way to the various beaches and the Knap swimming pool, and this would place a strain on the normal bus services. Thus a special ‘summer service’ was operated on routes to Barry Island, and University students trained and employed as bus conductors, collecting fares and ensuring the safety of passengers. The regular bus drivers at that time were required to work a proportion of 'split shifts', working about 4 hours early morning and 4 hours later in the day. During the summer these drivers on split shifts were required to work over-time in between their shift splits. Not very safe, in my opinion. In the two summers that I worked as a Bus Conductor, buses I worked in had (minor) crashes du e to the driver literally 'dropping off to sleep'. It was a grand time. Sometimes you could find yourself put on the Cardiff, Penarth, or Vale of Glamorgan service. At some of the termini, we had breaks of up to 30 minutes. Just right to try my hands at bus-driving ! The Leyland Tiger Single Decker, the Leyland Double-decker, an AEC double-decker with the open rear access, the early Atlantean with the epi-cyclic semi-automatic gearbox - I drove them all. Oh and the dealing with 'Inspectors' !!!!. These 'little-S*ds' (just like that guy Blakey in the comedy series 'On the Buses') would check that you were 'on time'. If you dared to be even 1 minute early leaving a stop, or a passenger complained about any aspect of your 'Service', then you got a “Please Explain”. This was a letter from 'the Traffic Managers', setting out the details of the 'problem', always asking you to “Please Explain” (the sentence at the end of the letter). I had several of those in my time... Another point. If you were 'short' in the cash at the end of the day, then the deficit was made up out of your wages. The basic pay was £10 a week, but overtime generally made it up to about £14 a week then, which was about half what I earned in my first year in a proper graduate job. In order to ensure that you were never out of pocket - by issuing wrongly priced tickets (those ticket machines were quite difficult to operate at times) or by giving the wrong change (very easy in a crowded bus), I was taught a number of 'minor fiddles', which generally amounted to about 5 to 40 pence a day. I would bet the whole proceeds of these ‘fiddles’ (when in profit – which was NOT every day) on the gee-gees. At the end of each summer, my total winnings amounted to about £15 ... Hey Mr Postman ! Another good opening at Christmas was of course, the postal service. You had to be over 18 years' old and it was only 2 – 3 weeks employment but it had the distinct disadvantage of a very early start. I was soon on the 05.00 start. Why was this ? Simple - because I knew my neighbourhood so well – mixed housing and flats, and our regular 'postie' was an experienced 'sorter'. Thus I was given the whole job of the final sorting for my 'round'. And this 'round' started from next door to the sorting office and finished at the end of the road where I lived. So I was usually the first to finish the first round, and could get overtime making the deliveries of those whose alcohol consumption caused them to over-sleep. If you were down for a 06.00 start, and you turned in after 07.00, you were sent back home. It was generally a bit of a doddle, but starting at 05.00 was a bit of a bind. Gave me a good insight into the problems facing a postman (bitten by dogs twice and fell over obstructions on garden paths three times). This stood me in very good stead later in life when two postmen were the Chairmen of the two main Committees that I reported to when I was the Public Analyst in Edinburgh. Helped me a lot in my relationship with the Regional Council and the setting of my Departmental Budget each year .... (another tale). Butlins ! (but a Brown Coat Job) At the end of my second year at University, they had just commenced building a Butlins Holiday Camp on 'Nell's Point', to the eastern end of the Barry Island beach. Brilliant opportunity I thought then, and I was right. I arrived back from university on the Thursday and the following Monday, I started as a Driver/labourer. Labour was generally in short supply then because a power station was being built just along the coast, and the pay there was very generous. I was soon driving various sizes of dumper trucks whilst the site was being excavated, graduating to drivin g 'Drott' tracked Earth-Movers ! Even had a shot of a Crane used to lift steel beams into place when assembling the main buildings. One thing I soon learned about the British 'worker' was that he was generally not reliable, and could not be trusted to turn up to work every day. I went in all the days that I could, and was always willing to learn. At the end of 10 weeks, there were only 3 workers who had been there longer than me. My worst job when there? Lifting 'biscuits' (large panels of wood shavings impregnated with concrete) up to the first and second floors of the steel building frame to form the floors. Ready-Mix concrete (from Bowles !!) was then poured on these to produce the finished floor. Wheeling barrow-loads of concrete and shovelling concrete was also not exactly the most relaxing of pastimes. When I started back at University I started a craze for students at Birmingham wearing ‘Wimpey’ Donkey jackets .... On a more serious note, when I was driving a dumper truck, I saw a steel erector fall from the top of one of the buildings. He landed about 12 feet away from me and died instantly. I still have THAT image .... Oh, and I suggested to one of my friends that he should try for a job on the site to assist with the ‘setting-out’ of the site. He was training to be a Chartered Surveyor. Twenty tears later, he was still working for Butlins, in a Senior Estates Management position. The Condom King ? There was a bit of a scandal at Birmingham University in 1965, when the Students Union Barber Shop was stopped from selling condoms. What a business opportunity ! I soon found a supplier (wholesale), and the occasional card on the Student Union found a few clients. Provided a net income of a pound or two a week during most of my second year. I had a system for arranging a discrete supply that was much more convenient for students than going to the loc al chemists’ shop (and cheaper too !). Fortunately, my supplies were almost completely 'out' when the Barber started selling them (discretely) again. Bowles-the-Quarry (2) The sign “Workers Wanted” was up again outside the quarry in the late May of my last year at University and (being ‘cheeky’ and having finished my 'Finals') I applied to work there again. This time they were short of Dumper Truck drivers !! And I now had experience of that work. Bliss. Large Yellow 6-wheeler Euclid Dumper Trucks. My experience of driving the older smaller (Aveling Barford) versions at Butlins stood me in good stead and I was 'over 21', so after demonstrating my prowess on a short test drive, I was hired 'on the spot'. OK, the drive in the truck was not particularly inspiring. Two or three dampers were used, taking the rock from the bottom of the quarry out of the quarry, onto the highway for about 50yards, then back into the top level of the quarry where it was dumped into the crusher. Frequently you had to wait to be loaded. From the second day, I took in books to read (Steinbeck, Miller, Woodhouse, Kerouac - even Dickens - were consumed with relish.... I also helped occasionally with the loading of the stone onto the trucks (with a Ruston Bucyrus 22RB tracked grab excavator) and used a wheeled front-bucket excavator (a 'Chaseside'). Like the smaller dumpers, this had front wheel drive and rear-wheel steering, but was VERY powerful. Quite interesting to drive. Possibly the highlight of my time was when I had to take one of the Euclids into Cardiff for a 'major service'. I felt like 'King of the Road' in that truck. Oh and one day I helped to operate the drilling machine to drill the places for the setting of explosives for a 'face-blasting'. The whole Bowles family turned out one Saturday afternoon for that. Oh, and the ‘expl osives ‘expert was called “Paddy” ..... My degree result came through (2nd Class – division 2 – bit disappointed, but glandular fever earlier in the year had taken its toll). That was sufficient to get me offered two out of my three preferred jobs that i had applied for. So I decided ... the Public Analysts Service. Why this one? Well, one of the young ladies that I had 'romanticised' when at the Ice Cream Parlour had told me about her sister's fiancé who worked in the Public Analyst Laboratory in Cardiff, and how interesting that job was. When I went for an interview at the Public Analyst Laboratory in Matlock, I knew quite a lot about the essence of the work of a Public Analyst. I was prepared and could speak easily on how my laboratory and university training would enable me to make a contribution to the work of not only the Laboratory in Matlock, but to the profession as a whole. I was asked about my ‘varied’ working experience and asked why I had not continued with Laboratory work experience when I was at the University. I must have appeared to be a completely different 'kettle of fish' to those others that they interviewed. I explained that it had given me experiences that I would never have an opportunity of experiencing again in life, whereas, I was now likely to spend the rest of my working life in a Laboratory. Seemed to satisfy them. Conclusions In retrospect, the economic advantages from working during my time as a student now seem so much less important than the extra dimensions that all this 'student work' has given my life. I carried out jobs for short periods that others have to do every day of their working lives. To watch construction or quarry-working and to be able to think that I could get into and operate almost any of that 'plant’ machinery .... I also learned very important lessons that later assisted me when in a management position (and even now in a Consultancy position). I saw examples of good management practice and examples of poor management practice. I met people who were easy to work with, and those who were not. I soon learned both how to ‘wind people up’, and also how to make a good impression. Perhaps the greatest impact that it made on my life was that it made me socially at ease in any company. I met loads of people that otherwise I would not have known. I still meet some of them when I go back to Barry, my home town that (in effect) I left at the age of 18 years (almost 39 years' ago). I learned to drink alcohol with moderation, to drink coffee, and to be at ease in the company of women ... and, yes, to flirt ... and all before I went to University. Now, of course, it is much more difficult to get into some of the areas of employment that I have referred to. Also, the allowances/gifts that most of us can afford to give our children means that the economic necessity for children to work is sometimes not so great before the University expenses start to come in. My own children did not work before their University vacations, but each has gained some valuable experience in their vacation jobs, but without the shear variety that I managed to experience. I tried to keep 2 or 3 weeks at the end of the vacation to take a holiday of some sort. I hitch-hiked to London for a week when I was 16 and to Belgium/France when I was 17 and 19, and went to the USA for 6 weeks before I started my job in Matlock. I could not have afforded any of this if I had not worked. Recommendations 1 The main feature of getting the employment was that in most cases, I had to get up off my a*se and go out to get the job. That is still very good advice today. Far too many people (not only students) believe that the 'ideal' job is going to find them. Sometimes you really have to really put yourself out to get the job. Without a measure of personal 'gumption', I certainly would not have worked at the 'Mighty Atom'/Fortes/Bowles/Buses/Butlins. And if I hadn't worked at Forte's, then I might never have ended up in the situation I am in now... 2 Remember, after you graduate, your scope of trying different fields of employment is generally much more limited. Obviously, new Health & Safety requirements limit the scope for employment a little since my days, but there are opportunities out there if you look for them. Our son's job last summer at a car importer's premises (see my opinion) was a 'real gas' (his words – not mine !). 3 Don't go with the tide or stay in a rut. Selling burgers, delivering papers, stacking shelves, operating a check-out are all good experience for a short period to check them out, but look around you for inspiration. The whole world of work really is out there to experience ! 4 Probably the best thing you can do for your children when they are young is to get them inspired to learn a suitable musical instrument. That can be a skill that will become financially valuable. Our son learned to play the violin, became interested in Traditional Music and Folk/Folk-Rock, and earns well during term time playing at 'gigs' at the weekends. Generally gets between £40 and £120, depending on venue and whether he is in a group or engaged as a soloist. Beats shelf-stacking/burger stalls/bars - and there is often free booze. Earns sufficient to run a car and with his 'allowance', to save most of his student loan in an interest-bearing account. At his age, of course, I had a different type of ‘fiddle’, when I worked on the buses..... © Sidneygee 2002

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                05.03.2002 02:05
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                Student jobs can be great – the opportunity to put something on your C.V. and earn money seems too good to miss. Some of my friends at other universities have weekend jobs, and though they find it hectic, they learn a lot and it helps pay the bills. As many of you know, I’m at Oxford, and the situation here’s different – full time study means just that (I’ve written three essays in one week before) and we’re not allowed to employment for more than six hours a week in term time. Thankfully our short intensive terms mean longer holidays, which gives ample opportunity for vacation work. So what takes priority – money or experience? Well, obviously it depends on your circumstances (how high is that overdraft?). Personally I’d like to go into journalism, but many placements are unpaid. The alternative tends to be taking a job for money, but temporary student jobs often seem pretty poor ones. In an ideal world, perhaps you can compromise – find an interesting and paid job (even if it is poor pay). A few years ago (at school), I did a brief placement in a civilian MoD office. It was unpaid, but very informative – giving me my first experience of an office environment. Unfortunately my chances to work as part of a team were limited (being changed between offices didn’t help), but I still gained valuable experience with many aspects of administration: word processing, photocopying, filing, faxing and making telephone calls. Last year, at university, I was in need of more money, so I spent my vacations doing part-time work at the local supermarket. At first, I thought my checkout position would just mean £3.90 an hour and the chance to sit down, but to my surprise even here I learned much more: getting used to working life, being part of a team, handling money, customer relations. It seems many students naturally assume there’s a conflict between working for money and f or C.V. points. What I’ve learned is that when given a bit of thought, any job should contribute to your C.V. and could provide much more than just some holiday cash. At the end of the day though, I’d rather do something I enjoy and boost my C.V. – that’s far more important long-term than a bit more debt now. I think it’s best to concentrate on your long-term prospects – and that means unpaid placements if necessary. At the moment I’ve been looking for opportunities to write elsewhere. The internet’s been a good place to begin – not only have I found out about career opportunities online, but I’ve had work printed on several sites, and even earned a bit of pocket money from Dooyoo. At the moment, I’m looking to take a step up (which often means less pay!) Last term, as some of you may know, I had a brief article printed in a national magazine (Internet Advisor) and over Easter I intend to contact several local newspapers about the chances of an unpaid summer job. Personally, however, I haven’t found my student jobs all that valuable. I’m not denying that they can be, and I’d accept that perhaps I should’ve tried to make better use of my time. On the other hand, I’d prefer to have some time off in my vacations (apart from catching up with old friends, and doing college work). Sure it leaves you worse off, but hopefully I’ll be able to get a decent job when I graduate, so I don’t mind using my loan now. Student life’s supposed to be about having fun, not worrying about money (I’ve written about ‘thrift tips for students’ elsewhere) so when it comes to my holidays I’ll do what I want – and that may mean unpaid work or just relaxing, rather than some of the unfulfilling ‘dead-end’ jobs that seem to be the only prospect for students where I live. I recognise that perhaps this isn’t an option for everyone – maybe some people need the money. I’m not well off by any means (I get the maximum loan – which helps). There are plenty of opportunities to save and make money though, without a regular job. I’m just over half way through my course, and I’ve made around £1300 online (through Dooyoo, Ciao, MyPoints, MyVoice, VisitorFriendly, etc). To tell the truth, many of these don’t actually pay well for your time, but I find them more enjoyable than a ‘proper job’ and, more importantly, flexible. I also take advantage of other chances for earning on the side – students can often find opportunities as ‘guinea pigs’ – one of my flatmates is currently doing a malaria vaccine trial for which he’ll get around £1200. I wouldn’t be happy about doing that (nor would my parents) but I have taken part in other experiments, such as on voting behaviour, for which you can be paid up to £10 for 1-2 hour’s ‘work’. (Hopefully) I’ve got a long career ahead of me. For now, student jobs aren’t for me. **This opinion was based on a shorter article written for the Oxford University careers magazine, Compass** (I feel just like x_elff_x)

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                  14.12.2001 23:03
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                  OK. Leaving the old squishyrat wit behind for a second. I've just emailed this to Glasgow's Broadsheet paper. Just a thought for one of their articles in the education supplement. It regards one of my peers - let's call her 'Student X' for ease. Student X was delighted to be accepted at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music And Drama for a Batchelor of Arts in Musical Studies. This degree with selective honours is a full time one, although, this being a performing arts school, students are expected to put in many hours of practise outside academy hours. First year, spent in student flats, was never an issue with council tax. Then End-of-Term exams reared their ugly heads, and Student X, despite obtaining the highest mark in her class for performance, failed a minor assessment. Student X did not return home for the summer break this year. Instead, she chose to spend as much time as possible practising for her resit, although, with no student loan funding available over the summer months, she found herself having to work full-time to support herself. The resit arrived, and, very unfortunately she failed by a tiny margin. This meant she was unable to pass to the second year of the degree. Thus began the complications. Having obtained such a high mark for her practical performance, Student X was informed that she would be able to resit the assessment again in 2002. In the meantime, she was accepted on to the Continuing Education Course, as a bridge between years one and two. The Student Loan Company informed her that she was ineligible for a loan of any description from themselves, as it was not a full-time course. They suggested she tried Hardship Funding, for which she was turned down. The gist of the part-time problem is that in an ordinary academic establishment, people expect students on a part-time course to only attend classes for a few hours a week. The spare time then would be taken up with a practically full-time job, thus earning enough to live on. Nobody has acknowledged that in an establishment where the emphasis is placed on practical achievements and performance, that students here are told to spend (regardless of which Course)at least three hours a day practising. Add this to the academic assignments and other lessons, not forgetting orchestra or choral work, and it is easy for the layman to see how even a part-time job is difficult to maintain. Even a part-time course ends up being full-time Which brings me on to the Council Tax problem. No longer classified as a full-time student, Student X is now liable to pay council tax. She lives with another full-time student, and so receives 25% discount on the full amount due. However: with an income from her weekend job of £60 per week, no student loan whatsoever and having to pay her fees (again, because of the part-time course factor) the presentation from the Council (obviously after losing all the necessary forms at least twice) of an £800 outstanding bill due in full by March 2002. She is not eligible for JSA, as she would have to commit to looking for a full-time job. Which, of course, she certainly isn't. She's just trying to fulfill her potential through education, and is facing incredible difficulties. It seems that through doing this course, she is automatically 'disabled'. Prejudiced against simply because the people she needs and deserves help from haven't taken into account the nature of her course. All they see is the word 'Part-time'. Yes, it's just one situation, one very unfortunate individual. But there must be others out there in it.

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                    07.11.2001 02:20
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                    ~ Intoduction ~ The 3 or 4 years at University are going to be the best years of your life. I graduated in July 2001 and wish I could have made it last longer. If there are any first years reading this I strongly recommend that you fail part of your first year, when you repeat it the following year you will have one of the easiest years of your life. ~ How do live the high life without working? ~ The answer is gambling. When I say gambling I am not talking roulette or scratch cards, I am taking about games where you can be a favourite. My choices were Poker and Blackjack. If you want to read more about poker I have written the top-rated opinion on dooyoo about it. The key fact to remember about poker is that you are not playing against the casino (the house) you are playing against other players, if you are a better player than them then in the long run you will win. Blackjack is very different, for starters you are playing against the house and they would not offer the game unless they have an advantage. This advantage can be neutralised. I'm sure everyone has heard of card counting and dismissed it as a system purely for mathematicians and the Rain Man, many also assume that if a casino catches you you will take a beating. These are myths. Card counting does not involve memorising every card in the shoe it merely involves finding out whether there are more high cards or low cards in the deck, high cards favour the player/ high cards favour the casino. If you raise your stakes when the cards are high you gain a positive expectation of between 2-10%. This may not seem like much but it can earn you a lot more than any student job will. A good blackjack book can be bought on the Internet for $10-20 and you earn that back within minutes. Good poker books are also available and I have suggested some in my opinion on poker. ~ Getting your stake ~ Firstly get a student loan, you don&# 39;t have to pay them back until you are earning a good wage and once you are earning that wage the repayments seem tiny. I covered all my student loans within two months of starting work. Secondly, ask your parents. Surely you can some off them (tell them it is for books). I made a point of paying my parents back but many don't. Thirdly, Hardship funds. Trash your room, wear scruffy clothes to the interview and you could grab yourself and extra £500 here and there. With all that you should be able to get about £3000 in your first term. A good stake. ~ Targets ~ I aimed to make about £200 a week whilst at Uni. This can take anywhere from an hour to 6 hours a night 5 nights a week. You will have the odd dry patch, never chase your losses (if you know what you are doing the winnings will come). The advantage of adding Poker into the mix is that you can grind your money out in cash games and once in a while you may do well in a tournament. There are tournaments most nights in major cities and first prize is rarely below £1000. ~ Conclusion ~ I'm not saying this approach is for everybody, some of you may enjoy being a typical student. If you take this route you have to be prepared for the swings that will occur, when you win save some, when you lose walk away - never start reaching further into you winnings than you expected to. I usually set myself a maximum loss for the week (eg £250), once I had lost this much I would walk away and start again on Monday. If you want an exciting ride through Uni and want money to burn then give it a try. I'll be writing an opinion soon on how to get a degree without any effort, it's easy if you know how.

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                      13.10.2001 03:08
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                      I'm currently a senior at a university within the United States. My school requires that students gain work experience in their field during their college education. Students are paid for their work at much higher rates than they would be at a typical on campus job. These jobs entail working full-time for periods of 3-6 months at a time. At the end of the experience, a student is recieves a pass/fail rating based upon employer evaluations, a student evaluation, and a report on the position and how it relates to the field of study. The number of times a student goes on a co-op during their time in college varies significantly by major. These positions provide students with funds to help pay for their education. The amount of money made varies from major to major, but in most cases, the amount earned is enough to cover the costs of one term of the year. The work experience also helps the student when they look for a job at the end of their college career. Also, the cooperative education experience can help a student determine if they are in the right field of study before they graduate. The life experience that students gain in these positions can be invaluable when determining if you are going down a career path that will bring you happiness. The cooperative education program provides college students with some base experience before graduation as well as provides money to these students.

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                      20.08.2001 01:43
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                      It is inevitable that some students will need to work during their time at uni. A job will not necessarily mean that your studies will be neglected, thats up to you. But what is available? The Student?s Union are pretty good at advertising local work and there is always the job centre. These places however tend to churn out the usual jobs. I know that I didn't want to work in a bar, get paid minimum wage and not get to go out with my mates. Here are a six alternatives to earn a bit of cash and gain some experience. 1. Guinnea Pig Psychology departments especially are always looking for participants to take part in their experiments. Our department at Lancaster pay about £3 for a 15 minute experiment, that works out at £12 an hour if you do enough experiments. Don?t be put off by the term ?psychology?, most of the experiments do not require any electrical rods and the researchers do not wear white coats! The nature of experiments tend to be memory and perception based. Downside is that you can only do them once and there is only a certain amount of experiments going on at one time. 2. Teaching Assistant in School I was on the Casual Non-Teaching Register in Lancaster. This means that if any of the classroom assistants or special support assistants are ill or on courses, the school phones up and you take their place. I was paid £6.32/hr. To get enough work it is up to you to be known by the schools. For example, drop in to the schools or phone them to check they?ve got your details. This work is great if you want experience with children or in schools and is looked upon favourably by PGCE admissions tutors. 3. Teaching Assistant at Uni Some departments need postgrad and final year students to help in the workshops, lab sessions and seminars. This is not widely available but does pay well. Depending on what you are doing the pay ranges between £7 & £15. 4. Life Model If you?ve got the guts to strip off for the f irst year art students can earn you a little extra. They look for models who have more interesting bodies than your average skinny catalogue model. My housemate with a curvy body and tattoos modelled in her second year, they loved her! She enjoyed doing it and they look after her. She can have a drink or move whenever she wants. They play by her rules. She got paid £8 and hour. 5. Bank Work No, not robbing banks, although it could be fun?Local hospitals and care homes often need staff to stand in when they are inevitably understaffed. Pay usually starts from £6/hr but increases considerably for weekend and evening work. I have a couple of friends who really enjoy working in the local mental ward. They get as much work as they want and relevant experience for their future careers. 6. Lifeguard Local swimming pools cry out for qualified lifeguards. The course costs between £60 and £150 and gives you the training required. It is tough but enjoyable. The course is mainly first aid and rescue techniques but you have to have fitness and theory tests too. It was the hardest exam I have ever taken but would recommend it! The pay varies from minimum to about £15/hr for specialist activities. The hours fit in well with lectures as more lifeguards are needed at weekends and early evenings. Try them out!

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                        14.08.2001 04:42
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                        I have read a few opinions which seem to suggest that to work while you are studying means sacrificing your degree to a certain extent. I'm afraid I believe this to be nothing more than an excuse and that working part time during the term and full time during the summer is an integral part of your period as a student. As suggested in another opinion on this topic, it is time management which is the key during term time. Whilst studying for my BSc, I found myself with a lot less work to do in the first year than I expected. Therefore, instead of spending the extra time with Richard and Judy or out at the pub, I got a job at a local supermarket with flexible hours. It was no problem fitting it in around my studies and my work didnt suffer. Suprisingly, either did my social life and if I was working in the evening, I would just go straight to the pub to meet my mates after work (with a slightly fuller wallet.) I worked approximately 16 hours a week which I fitted in to my schedule fine. I would not have wanted to work much more than this since then I may have been cutting into either work or social time. Obviously, during the later university years, you have to cut down the amount of time you spend on your part-time job. I also worked full time during the summer. I did not get any really exciting jobs but I learned a great deal from working in different environments and it looks good on your CV - even if you were just a shop assistant in a motorway services! I found that it made me enjoy my summer holiday so much more because I could make good use of the time I had off to go out and enjoy myself without worrying too much about my finances. I also had a healthier bank balance when I returned to uni. However, I think you can go too far with part-time jobs when you are a student. The amount I worked, I managed my studies with no problem at all and dont think I would have done any better in my degree if I had not worked pa rt-time. But I had a friend who worked almost full time doing night shifts and his studies really suffered. He pulled in 12 grand a year to support himself but he barely passed and found himself exhausted all the time. As with most things, the answer is to find a balance that suits the individual. In my opinion, you should try to work part-time, at least during the early years of university. If the study takes over in the final year then just give up. Summer jobs are also a must for most students. Not only are they helpful (if not essential) for your finances, they let you meet a wide variety of people and show employers in the future that you are not afraid of hard work. So, fellow students, get yourself down the job centre and find yourself a few hours a week for next year. You'll thank me for it - honest!

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                          11.08.2001 21:50
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                          • "You will always be in debt"

                          Personally I am trying to avoid work during term time unless it is absolutely necessary. Although I have to pay for my path through university myself, I am fortunate to have some unit trusts which mean that together with a student loan and an overdraft, I can get by without working during term time. This plan partly revolves around working through holidays, but despite currently not being able to find any work, I am still determined not to have to get a job during term time. This is because I feel that it would be reckless to risk my studies as a job could result in dropping down a degree level from what I would expect to get if I didn't work. I would class myself as well organised and conscientious student and if forced to I believe I would be able to balance paid work and studies, but don't think the rewards are worth the undeniable risk. Obviously some people find affording university even more of a struggle and have no choice but to find work during terms and I suppose some people may be sure that they can cope with their course and a job, but I believe that in the long run it could be disasterous. A job leaves limited time for out for background studying and yet with a little more money and the pressure of having a job as well as lectures, I think that few people would give up much in the way of socialising. If you analyse the long-run consequences of dropping a degree grade, it just doesn't make sense. Working during term, you might earn £50 a week (obviously it depends on the job and hours, but the more you are working, the higher the risk) which would add up to around £5000 over the entirety of a 3 year course. However, if this means getting a 2:2 instead of a 2:1 at the end of your course, it could have a dramatic reflection on future earnings, which could easily end up being a difference of £5000 every year for the rest of your working life. Some people may decide that they have to work in order to cut back on their debt so that they don't carry it all though until graduation. Personally I can't really see the point of this as no one can realistically expect to lead a debt free life until they have paid off their mortgage not long before they retire. Clearly, not everyone that works during term time will drop a grade as a result, but it must be much more likely, so I think it is far more sensible to try to work as much as possible during holidays, which should provide enough cash to see you through the academic year along with a student loan.

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                            09.08.2001 16:56
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                            It was John Cleese, in his Rectorial address following his installation as Lord Rector of St Andrews University, who said “Don’t let University get in the way of your education”. He was making a very valid point, that there is a lot more to your time are University than merely academically working for 3-6 years. Similarly though how much should work get in the way of your studies though? Due to the progressive cutbacks on students in terms of grants and money, and with more onus on parents providing for their offspring, many students have found it necessary to get a part time job, or in some cases a full time job in order to be able to survive University. I consider myself very fortunate to have not had to work as well as doing my degree, as I noticed that a lot of my friends who were dong a job ultimately were sacrificing their studies in the process. I freely admit that I didn’t live like a pauper at University, but nor was I bankrolled through University by my parents. I realised, after spending two summers doing lowly remunerated jobs in England, being, amongst other things, a tomato picker, a rotten egg smasher and a plant packer for a mail order company. I found that working in these jobs kept me through the summer, on minimal expenses, but it didn’t help to set me up for the forthcoming academic session. I also realised that the sacrifices of working hard during the summer also meant that I wasn't confined to an existence of culinary misery unlike some of my friends, and I probably stayed healthier than those who scrimped and saved and worried their way through it all. Therefore after my third year, spent in Austria working as a language assistant, and being paid a fairly ludicrous amount for relative little work, and with the opportunity to earn more by private tuition I realised that for the next two years of my degree, which were ultimately the two which were to be the make or break ones, I wou ld have to get a buffer of cash on, especially having heard about flatmates and their woes of dissertations and working, as after all no one will accommodate your academic commitments that fully if you want to work for them. Therefore I went out to Brussels and was somewhat of a corporate whore – the summer student who was doing a 60 hour week – and a 40 hour weekend. This concentrated work allowed me to have no money worries for the first half of the year, although my overdraft did snowball rapidly during the second semester. I did the same after my fourth year, and was able to live a similar lifestyle during my fifth year, although a three week cricket tour of Barbados did leave my final semester a banking nightmare. This might appear to be rambling and getting nowhere – however to put it all in context, I had friends who worked long hours to avoid getting an overdraft – but at the detriment of their courses. Many I knew who worked ended up with worse degree results, and if anything stressful times for everyone were like normal times were for them – and they buckled under the strain often of the added stress. In Austria many of my friends who study also do a job, and it is probably the reason why they are always failing exams, retaking semesters and taking an eternity over their degrees. If the thought of hardship is one that scares you, think of the fact that a degree classification higher can add a lot onto your salary, marketability etc. Whilst I am still technically unemployed, being a freelance translator (although I can earn an incredible amount (e.g. £3000 some months)), and would admit that I am getting tired of the limited budget that I have to live off on other months, due to the debts I left with, I am still in a better position than some are, due to the fact that they devoted too much time to their work and not their studies. Getting a job may not be the panacea for being financially worry fre e that you may think, a job can affect you in other ways such as your academic performance and can be counter-productive in the end. If you can survive without one do, as often or not, the amount you will earn will never be saved, and will just go in other directions.

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                              27.07.2001 10:37
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                              I write some opinions on here that sometimes exagerate facts to make a point and sometimes push the limits of my very selective memory but this one is entirely true, although I can't blame you if you chose not to believe me. I was just a small town midwestern (USA) 17 year old kid when I first set foot on campus twelve years ago. Just for the record I am the most unsicilian person around, my genes hail from the North coast of Europe for the most part and I don't come off as very roman at all. Geepers, I wax romantic about those pure innocent days when my life was all about learning and open to all sorts of new things. I was trying to be a rock star and student and was subject to all sorts of whims and impulses. I wanted to be in both the Student Environmental coalition and the Young Republicans. I had my thick full head of hair (now leaving me strand by strand in the bathtub drain on a daily basis) and I was skinny, I was really skinny and hadn't defaced my whole body with tattoos. I was a far different lad than the person I am today. man, it is hard not to think about what I have done right and wrong since then, to try to analyze all the coulda beens and shouldabeens. Not that I haven't been happy, but that first quarter at the University was a big fork in the road of life and I still have to think about the choices that I made and what I could have done different. Young, naive, sheltered andf inexperienced was really a good description of me. Ok, enough background let me get to the coolest student job of all time. History was my thing, I was 6th out of 17,000 people who took the senior history exam in my state and it won me a partial scholarship. I knew my history. Unfortunately back then I was also accustomed to citing history to support my venemous spewing of racial hate and discord. I never really liked history for the sake of thinking it was neat how the Egyptians had so many far-out gods or how the mayans bu ilt such fascinating things, sadly my passion of history was just adding pieces, text by text, book by book, into this gigantic proof or study on the rise of the europeans. History wasd just sort of my justification of bigotry and I was the apt pupil so to speak. I wish I could have just liked history because my uncle was a nut who liked to dress up like a Confedrate soldier and go to living history camps or because my dad had got me interested in the history of railroads or something. I feel bad about the person that I had been, but i was a top notch history student on the account of it, that is what the important point is here. I got my first exam back in my American History class. The prof had made the score 115% as to "be fair about curving the other scores". The three very conspicious guys who sat behind me were cursinga nd swearing and pretty obnoxious about their scores. I did not like these guys. They were big and mean and very arrogant. They also sat together in the ROTC class that I was in. the one guy, and his name really was Tony, kicks me in the back (we were in like a tiered auditorium) and I turn around. "Whatchu git", he asked and I show him my score. "You think you know history or sumthin? You smart or somethin? You were the first person done in here", I was sort of intimidated. "I do Ok in this subject", I answered sheepishly. "Well I needs a tutor" he said flopping his test over for me to see his 60. The TA is still handing out the tests while the prof is dealing with one of the so called "non traditional students" (old people who go back to school) who always seem to waste so much of their time. So I wasn't making a disruption when I turned around and started to explain, "what you need to do is go over to U Hall and they have an office on the first floor where you can sign up for free help and these will pay someone to work with you" "No you &#*^$", he says all annoyed, "Them &*%@*%%@$ won't help anybody for #@^!" "Yes they will it is their job", I tell him. Tony takes a long hard look at me and studies my clothes, "You shoes are cheap", he tells me rather matter of factly, "You ain't got much money do you" This rather annoyed me as they were decent shoes, I certainly wasn't ashamed of them, but yes they were not exactly top shelf. I had never heard that kind of meaness about a trivial matter at college. "No", I answered, I was hurt and felt so small and bad, here I was at college and was being bullied by someone I was so much smarter than just because he had money. It was like the last place I should of had to shrink back, a freshman History class where I was the star. "Hey man, I ain't rippin on ya or nunthin, I am just saying I betcha could use some bread is all, like I wouldn't expect a rich kidda want ta make some bread by helping me" "I guess I can help you", I said , still confused by all of it. "ok, you come eat with us after class" After class we walked to their car. It was a great big obnoxious Lincoln. I had no car and these guys had a new Lincoln while everyone elses on campus had crappy little Datsuns or Ford Escorts. They just started driving We stopped at a rather fancy restaurant, like the kind I can barely tolerate paying for now on a special occasion. I was already humiliated by the comment about my shoes and resolved to keep my pride and pay my fair share So we sit at this restaurant and just look at each other. Finally while we are waiting for our food he asks me, "So you gonna help me or what?" "I can help you make study lists and stuff, I can pretty well guess what will be on a test before we get tested" Tony just shakes his head, "listen, I got my mudda, blesser h eart. She wants me to get some college. My father, he don't got eighth grade but he's got one of the biggest construction companies in X (I won't say the state). But my mom is not well she got that ovarian cancer stuff and all she wants is to see me go to college" For being able to name all the squad leaders in the 7th calvary at Custers Last Stand and recite long passage from the Art of War, I wasn't particularily perceptive. "Now all I am tying to get is a general studies degree it ain't like I am trying to be a doctor or an engineer and get it without really knowin it, right?" A lightbulb suddenly came on in my head and ironically the whole student handbook aboout academic honesty, and then my checkbook came to mind. "I could manage to take all four of our tests in the amount of time", I admitted, thinking about the multiple choice exams. "No, just two, these bozos gots to find their own tutors" Tony replied. Things got bizarre from that moment on. They took me shopping for starters and I ended up with odd pastel shirts and loud floral ties and alligator loafers (I did not wear them to the environmental club) I got to see for the first time people actually carrying around guns for no apparent reason. They took me everywhere and proudly announced me as "Tony's Tutor". I would go home on weekends and my parents were puzzled, my dad asked my mom, "wasn't our son Dutch/german before he went to school?". I would go to our Lutheran church where they still had German Mass like I walked off the set of the Sopranos. It had to be comical. But I had money, they gave me lots of money for my "help". I must have been a real jackass, a dutch boy playing Wiseguy. The best times I had during that quarter was when the three of them (they lived together) would each have their "tutor" come over(by this time we were writing their papers, doing all their homework and legitimately trying to prep them for tests that we could not take for them)Then they would have us watch jeopardy and make bets over whose tutor was the smartest or would do the best. They were always trying to figure out who had the smartest tutor. My great job ended abruptly. I went to the same classes as them for two quarters and then I decided I wanted to take the business curriculum why they preferred general studies which they found less boring...in the classes that they took attendance and had to be there. So I was under pressue to alter my goals for short term gain and I couldn't do it. At that time my nation called on me to stop tyranny in Kuwait and afetr the war I never made it back to college (if you doubt this, my reason for being so intelligent is that i watch a lot of TV). I will never forget this job, my best student job, heck it was the best job of all I ever had. I did see recently that my employer did get put away in a big RICO affair where he was from.

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